Home test available within days

That's what I'm hoping for. I've stayed isolated even thought I feel fine now and have done since Saturday. Pointless taking any risks.
Reading your other posts on this, I concurred with your symptoms almost precisely.
The initial burst was quite mild, then after a hiatus it came back with a vengeance. I still have problems breathing and my heart hurts, but was not ready for the kidney problems.
Last night I slept for 12 hours, and hopefully will tonight. I have eaten today, but not for the last 48 hours.
I am glad you are better, and you are right, no point taking risks. Wishing you a speedy recovery.
(For the stats guys, I am a 47 year old man in good health, apart from slightly high blood pressure).
 
Well you say that but how many mongs will buy a dozen or more, on the grounds that if they only buy one and it shows they haven't caught it yet, they will need to stockpile a good number so they can test themselves every few days?

Not that anyone would be so selfish as to hoard stuff of course, I mean it hasn't happened at all so far. Errm, has it?
Of only Anazon could limit the number of kits they despatch...
 
My understanding is that since Amazon have a vast and skilled distribution service, they have agreed to ship the kits to whomever.
That may well be true. Point being it's unlikely to be generally available for public to order online, hopefully avoiding interweb Armageddon.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
That may well be true. Point being it's unlikely to be generally available for public to order online, hopefully avoiding interweb Armageddon.
Agreed. I was replying to a post suggesting the Grauniad were talking bolleaux about Amazon being in any way involved.
 
I wonder if Amazon would be prepared to record customers' results, perhaps via their feedback system.
If this is going to be a commercial exercise, then they could encourage customers to report back by offering them some cash back or a discount. Knowing how many people had tested positive or negative would be useful.
 
I might be missing something here but there were suggestions in the article that those people who have been infected could be allowed to ignore the restrictions on movement etc.

I thought the whole point of everyone staying indoors as much as reasonable was to prevent the transmission to the vulnerable? If we're going to say "everyone stay home unless you've had COVID-19 in which case do what you want" then we might as well have kept the schools open, albeit with alterations for staffing, and let anyone willing to run the risk of getting infected crack on as normal.

Is it just a journo inventing things?
The problem I see with people having previously had the virus being permitted to freely associate is twofold.

1) Even if they are no longer at risk themselves from contracting the virus a second time they can still come into contact with the virus and spread it about. The more people that do this the greater the risk of others who haven't yet contracted the virus picking it up.

2) Some people who haven't tested themselves will see more and more people outside and think they can now go out because they haven't had virus and feel fine, or possibly think they have had the virus and been asymptomatic when they haven't.

There's no way the police could tell the difference if they are trying to maintain the lock down.
 
I wonder if Amazon would be prepared to record customers' results, perhaps via their feedback system.
If this is going to be a commercial exercise, then they could encourage customers to report back by offering them some cash back or a discount. Knowing how many people had tested positive or negative would be useful.
I agree. After the major rush, could this work retrospectively, could it give an indication to the spread of a virus?
I think I may have had it, how do I know? I currently do not work, and don‘t get out much, but if I got it and lots didn’t, I would like to know how.
ETA: J_G’s post below: If I think I got it done, and clear, ready to help the rest, what if I’m not?
 
The initial burst was quite mild, then after a hiatus it came back with a vengeance
How many days in was that?

I was a bit out of sorts Thursday and Friday, thought it was from too many painkillers as my sciatica had really been giving me grief for a couple of weeks. woke up Saturday coughing and coughing. Pressure on the chest got worse on Monday and really bad yesterday to the point breathing was tiring, today still coughing but the pressure on the chest is right down, breathing is easy.

No aches and pains. Beechams before bed and I have been sleeping alright. get up in the morning and as soon as I am upright I start coughing again.

Slight temperature Saturday but low enough I might not have noticed it on it's own without all the coughing a dose of paranoia making me really think about things. 12-13 year old kid down the road who has been tested and is positive had the same mild symptoms and not particularly high temperature, he started coughing Thursday and is still at it.

I have had a very easy time of it compared to some and I was hoping I had got away with it.

I'm similar to yourself 50, slightly high blood pressure, otherwise reasonably fit with no other issues.
 
It almost certainly will be. What isn't known is how rapidly this version of the virus mutates and if the mutations are enough to allow it to bypass immunity from a previous infection.

Your immune system will recognise the virus as being the same as before and rapidly destroy that virus without you realising. However, if the virus mutates enough that the proteins on the outside are different then your body won't recognise it as it will 'look' different.
True, but there’s no need to borrow trouble.

Once infected and recovered, current (albeit limited) information suggests you are immune until the virus mutates, which means you are free to continue with normal life without worrying about becoming ill again or infecting others (apologies Ortholith, I appreciate for you that is a ‘you think?’ type statement.)

So far as I’m aware there is no information either way as to speed of mutation, and at the moment there’s no reason to think that after this all over, vaccination to the Covid-9 virus won’t be managed in a similar manner to the current flu virus regimen, which is designed to take into account mutation of the flu virus.

Personally, until definitively described as otherwise by more than the press, I’m on the side of the government experts in saying that any antibody test should be treated with caution until fully evaluated.

I want them to be out there and available to everyone, but a test that is not fully accurate is worse than useless.
 
I live in Hampshire, which seems to be ahead of the curve, Covid-wise.
For me, this came on over two weeks ago. Felt a bit rough, bit like a mild flu.
Not like a cold. I fell and broke my cheekbone years ago - any cold/congestion gets into my sinus and hurts like hell, so none of that.
Mentioned on another thread, Jellyvodka may help. First symptoms as mentioned. Called me mum to cancel Mothering Sunday. She has her own issues to worry about.
Then felt better, maybe three days after. What was all the fuss about?
By about the 16th, I have gradually felt worse and worse. The usual flu, massive tiredness, difficult breathing and it hurts to piss.
Today: got up and me and Mrs R had some scran. Mrs R contacted a local garden centre and they will deliver some plants. Cheered her up, cheers me up, as long as I don’t have to plant them. I need all the breath I got.
ETA: meant to be a reply to blunt scalpel.
You can’t get a word in edgeways around here, these days.
 
The problem I see with people having previously had the virus being permitted to freely associate is twofold.

1) Even if they are no longer at risk themselves from contracting the virus a second time they can still come into contact with the virus and spread it about. The more people that do this the greater the risk of others who haven't yet contracted the virus picking it up.
No, that’s not how it works.

Put it this way, you have (probably) had the MMR vaccine; vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella, which means that those viruses are no longer able to survive on/in you; you can neither catch nor pass on those viruses.

I guess in theory if you were to meet someone with the live virus and then almost immediately meet someone who has no immunity you could pass it on, but that seems to me to be remote in the extreme and would have to be so rapid, the person with the live virus is more likely to be the vector than you are.

Or to put it another way, having recovered from the virus you are not then a human mosquito able to harbour a reservoir of the virus; if it touches you, it dies.

So far as we know at this time.

2) Some people who haven't tested themselves will see more and more people outside and think they can now go out because they haven't had virus and feel fine, or possibly think they have had the virus and been asymptomatic when they haven't.

There's no way the police could tell the difference if they are trying to maintain the lock down.
That’s a really good point, which from where I sit is in the ‘what we do the day after’ folder.

That is to say, how we manage getting back to normal, or some semblance of it, needs to be considered, but not in any great detail yet.

The antibody test isn’t realistically available and probably won’t be for a while yet, particularly to the general public, so I suspect that while consideration might be given to the mixing of immune with uninfected, how to manage the social nuance is way down the ‘to do’ list.
 
No, that’s not how it works.

Put it this way, you have (probably) had the MMR vaccine; vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella, which means that those viruses are no longer able to survive on/in you; you can neither catch nor pass on those viruses.

I guess in theory if you were to meet someone with the live virus and then almost immediately meet someone who has no immunity you could pass it on, but that seems to me to be remote in the extreme and would have to be so rapid, the person with the live virus is more likely to be the vector than you are.

Or to put it another way, having recovered from the virus you are not then a human mosquito able to harbour a reservoir of the virus; if it touches you, it dies.

So far as we know at this time.



That’s a really good point, which from where I sit is in the ‘what we do the day after’ folder.

That is to say, how we manage getting back to normal, or some semblance of it, needs to be considered, but not in any great detail yet.

The antibody test isn’t realistically available and probably won’t be for a while yet, particularly to the general public, so I suspect that while consideration might be given to the mixing of immune with uninfected, how to manage the social nuance is way down the ‘to do’ list.
This was more the area of my thought process. We are told we need to regularly wash our hands with soap & water (something I've always done after being out and about, particularly after going shopping) which implies that the virus can live for a finite time outside of the human body. We can pick up the virus after contact with various surfaces so it must be possible for us to transfer the virus by contact to another person. How long can the virus survive on our skin and clothing? Could a brush contact be sufficient to transfer the virus? I've heard the media repeat the same regular questions over and again but I've not heard these questions being asked.
 
This was more the area of my thought process. We are told we need to regularly wash our hands with soap & water (something I've always done after being out and about, particularly after going shopping) which implies that the virus can live for a finite time outside of the human body. We can pick up the virus after contact with various surfaces so it must be possible for us to transfer the virus by contact to another person. How long can the virus survive on our skin and clothing? Could a brush contact be sufficient to transfer the virus? I've heard the media repeat the same regular questions over and again but I've not heard these questions being asked.
That is a very good point, and the rationale for constant hand washing hasn’t been broadcast nearly widely enough, in my view.

It’s to do with being a vector, which is to say that if you are infected with the virus, until you develop an immunity to it you are a reservoir of that virus and able to pass it onto any other non-infected individual.

The public information film for ‘catch it, bin it, kill it’ is a pretty good transmission 101 lesson in my view, and gives a good outline of how a virus can be passed quickly around those who are not immune.

Washing ones hands thoroughly and regularly minimises the risk of passing on the virus; it doesn’t stop the risk, but it does reduce it, because quite simply you’ve removed it from the part of your skin that you’re touching things with.

So, I’m skirting the limits of my knowledge on epidemiology at his point, so any others here want to chip in and correct me, please do, but for what it’s worth I’ll try to answer your questions directly.

How long the virus can live on skin or clothing is different.

Skin of a non-immune individual, and for the virus it’s Miller Time having found a receptive host to replicate and proliferate; it will survive until your body develops enough antibodies to kill it off or you die.

If it lands on someone with sufficient Covid-9 antibodies, it’s doomed.

Survival on clothing is a bit different and is the same as survival on any other non-receptive surface, which is to say it will last as long as the cells the virus inhabits survive.

Spit, mucus, sweat, skin cells - they can all live for a while independent of you and if they’re hosting the virus they can infect any non-immune individual who touches those cells, but so far as I’m aware this is not like Anthrax spores that can become dormant, so when the cell dies, so does the virus.

So, to answer your next question, can brushing something infect you?

Yes, but an infected individual has to have left live infected cells on that surface and for you to then come into contact with that surface in a space of time before those infected cells have died for you to have a realistic chance of becoming infected.

That sounds like it should be a slow process, but it really isn’t and is why we see exponential growth of the number of infected people in those places where precautions aren’t taken.

I don’t know if that helps put you at ease or makes you more worried, but so far as I’m aware it’s accurate, though I’m always happy to be corrected, and on this doubly so.
 
True, but there’s no need to borrow trouble.

Once infected and recovered, current (albeit limited) information suggests you are immune until the virus mutates, which means you are free to continue with normal life without worrying about becoming ill again or infecting others (apologies Ortholith, I appreciate for you that is a ‘you think?’ type statement.)

So far as I’m aware there is no information either way as to speed of mutation, and at the moment there’s no reason to think that after this all over, vaccination to the Covid-9 virus won’t be managed in a similar manner to the current flu virus regimen, which is designed to take into account mutation of the flu virus.

Personally, until definitively described as otherwise by more than the press, I’m on the side of the government experts in saying that any antibody test should be treated with caution until fully evaluated.

I want them to be out there and available to everyone, but a test that is not fully accurate is worse than useless.
It's not a mutating type apparently - because it's unsegmented -posted elsewhere but:
 
TA: meant to be a reply to blunt scalpel.
Thanks very much. I thought you meant you felt like you had got over it and then it came back, that had me twitching.

Yeah, first three days I was wondering what all the fuss was about, day four let me know what all the fuss was about, slumped outside in a garden chair feeling like someone had laid a bloody paving slab on my chest. I could see then why it would screw someone with preexisting breathing issues. It really had me seeing a hospital visit in my near future.

Day five (yesterday) it seemed to have eased right off, still coughing quite a bit but that seems all for now.

I am guessing a lot of the people on this site have kept themselves in good shape and are fitter than me so hopefully they should be alright. Good luck to everyone on here.
 
If it lands on someone with sufficient Covid-9 antibodies, it’s doomed.
Something else I never thought about - I would have thought antibodies only applied once the virus penetrates a cell? Even if I'm immune the virus should be able to survive on the outside of my skin because it hasn't penetrated that physical barrier. I can lick my hands as much as I want because if the virus enters my body the immune system kicks in and destroys it.

Even if immune people aren't generating virions they could still touch door handle some mucky bugger has coughed on and then touch another 3 or 4 objects, potentially transferring virions to those surfaces as well.

Yes, but an infected individual has to have left live infected cells on that surface and for you to then come into contact with that surface in a space of time before those infected cells have died for you to have a realistic chance of becoming infected.
I've been told and it is apparently true - Covid-19: How long does the coronavirus last on surfaces? - that the coronavirus is better suited than most to surviving outside of cells. Hard surfaces are reckoned to harbour infectious virions for up to 3 days.
 

Nobbygas

Old-Salt
I don't think the tests will be handed out willy nilly. One thing the authorities need is data. They need to know how many people have already had the virus, therefore the tests and results need to be recorded.
Also, if you receive the news that you have had the virus and are now immune that doesn't stop you spreading the virus, so it's not back to normal for those folk.
 

Funbaby

Old-Salt
Antibody test: useless for early stage infections.

Potentially a great way to encourage spread.
 
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...
So far as I’m aware there is no information either way as to speed of mutation, and at the moment there’s no reason to think that after this all over, vaccination to the Covid-9 virus won’t be managed in a similar manner to the current flu virus regimen, which is designed to take into account mutation of the flu virus.
...
As there, as yet, have been no vaccines developed for any coronavirus that don't cause enhanced pulmonary pathologies upon subsequent exposure to the live virus, it is more likely to remain unmanaged in a manner similar to that of the common cold, which is also caused by coronaviruses.
 
With stereotypical efficiency, it seems the Boxheeds have found a way of multiplying the effectiveness of their testing regime.
Researchers at the German Red Cross Blood Donor Service in Frankfurt headed by Professor Erhard Seifried, and the Institute for Medical Virology at the University Hospital Frankfurt at Goethe University headed by Professor Sandra Ciesek succeeded in developing a procedure that makes it possible to immediately and dramatically increase worldwide testing capacities for detecting SARS-CoV-2.
 

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