Home invasion evasive behavior

#1
From The Truth about Violence: 3 Principles of Self-Defense by Sam Harris
...
Nothing good ever comes to people who allow themselves to be moved to a remote location at the mercy of a violent predator. The police call such places “secondary crime scenes.” They are always better for the attacker and worse for his victim because they are more isolated than the first point of contact. And although your home may be the most familiar place on earth to you, the moment an intruder enters, it becomes the equivalent of a secondary crime scene. You should also expect that any criminal who breaks into your home when you’re inside it has come prepared to murder you and your family. To naive readers, this may sound like an extraordinarily paranoid assumption. It isn’t. Mere burglars generally make sure a house is empty before breaking in.⁠

If a window shatters in the middle of the night and someone comes through it, your life is on the line. There is nothing to talk about, no offer of cash or jewelry to muster, no demands worth listening to. You must do whatever it takes to escape.

One of the most common and disturbing features of home invasions is how the victims’ concern for one another and desire to stay together is inevitably used against them. By exploiting these bonds, even a single attacker can immobilize an entire family. By merely holding a knife to the wife’s throat, he can get the husband to submit to being tied up. Again, it is perfectly natural for victims in these circumstances to hope that if they just cooperate, their attacker will show them mercy. If you get nothing else from this article, engrave this iron law on your mind: The moment it is clear that an assailant wants more than your property (which must be assumed in any home invasion), you must escape.

What if your attacker has a knife to your child’s throat and tells you that everything is going to be okay as long as you cooperate by lying face down on the floor? Don’t do it. It would be better to flee the house—because as soon as you leave, he will know that the clock is ticking: Within moments, you will be at a neighbor’s home summoning help. If this intruder is going to murder your child before fleeing himself, he was going to murder your child anyway—either before or after he killed you. And he was going to take his time doing it. Granted, it is almost impossible to imagine leaving one’s child in such a circumstance—but if you can’t leave, you must grab a weapon and press your own attack. Complying in the hope that a sociopath will keep his promise to you is always the wrong move.
...
The rest is worth reading. He argues basically avoid conflict and if it starts get the hell away as fast as possible. This is basically good advice outside of turf wars, screaming like a scalded sissy as you run away flinging valuables in every direction is also best practice.

In my experience burglars will take their chances with an occupied house even if it is also likely to be armed but its probably safest to assume the worse. Some will kill in the excitement of flight, especially if on their 3rd strike, a few come with that direct intent. Common police advice in the US on detecting an intruder is to forget about that new plasma screen downstairs, grab the firearms, get the family into a secure room and call 911, a tricky maneuver best practiced.

I do think it might take quite a lot of mental preparation for 250 pounds of Papa Bear actually to be legging it out the patio doors as the machete gets taken to the twins. However it certainly increases his odds of survival, I may start rehearsing this shortly.
 
#2
Makes sense, but could you live with the guilt of the kids being murdered because you legged it?
 
#5
Many single storey homes in the US have what is called a split plan design. That means the parents room is away from the kids room so that they don't hear the occasional bedroom athletic events. Then you have a 3 way split allowing for a guest room to be seperate from the other areas. These kind of designs creates a defence problem should anything ever happen. We have a 3 way split, our SOP is that wife goes to child in one area and I go the child in the other area moving through the main living area clearing it as I move. Yes, we both have pistols with lights fitted - Glock 17 and 19.

Florida is no problem. They have what is called a castle doctrine, this means if they set foot in your home you can shoot them. Add to that the fact that Florida has a no-retreat policy, this means you do not have to attempt to avoid conflict. Some States demand that you retreat until you can go no further before you may engage a target........errr, defend your family and yourself is what I meant. Add to that the fact that most grannies when they retire here buy themselves a .38 special for their bedside table and handbag qnd burglars just don't want to risk it.

However, because everyone can own a gun here the occurence of burglaries in my area is reasonably low. Our City (well they call it a City) has 25,000 inhabitants and there were on average 9 burglaries a month for the last quarter. I spoke with a plod from the neighbouring city yesterday and he said that the pre-christmas burglaries are on the rise there already. They are however a very affluent area next to another area that is considered to be economically affected.

There is a guy called Massad Ayoob, a septic police Captain, who teaches a course intended for the armed. Not only does he cover the practical elements of shooting he addresses dealing with violent encounters, dealing with the police post encounter and also how to manage yourself with lawyers after an incident. He has many Judges and Lawyers who attend his course to learn about the practicalities of citizen involved defensive shootings. His bottomline advice is, "If someone is breaking into your house and you shoot them either wait until they are in the window or if they fall back out of the window drag them back in the window".

To give an example of what is allowable - in Texas. Some years ago a bunch of Brit lads were on holiday in Texas and out on the piss. On the way back to their villa on foot they were making enough noise to wake the dead. They were also running up pathways to pound on peoples front doors.......for a larf. One of the lads runs up to one door, pounds on it and drops dead on the ground. The owner of the house had shot him through the door because he thought there was a home invasion. Dead 18 year old Brit, no charge to answer for the home owner.
 
#6
If you cant face the thought of legging it then take his 2nd suggestion and press your own attack. The real messsage here is dont hope that co-operating will result in a pleasant outcome. Someone who enters your house armed is almost certainly willing to use the weapon and, even if he isnt, it is reasonable for you to assume that he is and act accordingly. As stated "peaceful" burglars would normally target empty properties in preference to occupied ones so that fact that you are at home should be enough to suggest a more malicious intent or, at the very least, a dangerous level of desperation.
 
#7
Makes sense, but could you live with the guilt of the kids being murdered because you legged it?
I see your point Ding - you never know when you might need a kidney!
 
#9
To give an example of what is allowable - in Texas. Some years ago a bunch of Brit lads were on holiday in Texas and out on the piss. On the way back to their villa on foot they were making enough noise to wake the dead. They were also running up pathways to pound on peoples front doors.......for a larf. One of the lads runs up to one door, pounds on it and drops dead on the ground. The owner of the house had shot him through the door because he thought there was a home invasion. Dead 18 year old Brit, no charge to answer for the home owner.
I could have made good use of that law on Halloween!
 
#10
Makes sense, but could you live with the guilt of the kids being murdered because you legged it?
I've told the twins they are replaceable and they just need to show the love for Papa Bear.
 
#12
The reality is you will not be able to leg it.

You are woken by a noise, by the time you are awake enough to consider that you may be getting burgled or facing a robbery you are not going to be able to get out of the house. In the UK you can barricade at the top of the stairs to keep the intruders downstairs, or you can jump out of an upstairs bedroom window practicing your best PLF. There is no way you can past the intruder to get out of the front door, back door or patio door. UK bungalows tend to have their bedrooms located in the same area so it is easier to barricade in those too.

In the US house design is a different, as stated bedrooms tend to be seperated so you either sacrifice a kid - tempting with a teenager, or you plan on a fight. House design and construction in the US is generally piss poor so where you hear of home invaders kicking in the front door - it can be easily achieved.

Having been a UK plod I learnt a modicum about crime prevention; fitting the right locks, good doors, good windows, alarms etc, etc. I don't know what it is with them here they spend so much time posturing with guns to protect themselves they don't look at the basics of stopping the feckers from getting into the house in the first place. If you speak to a plod here they don't have a clue about basic crime prevention or the measures that can be implemented to prevent or deter ingress to a property. My house is kitted out to a decent UK spec to keep unwanted visitors out or to give me enough warning that they are trying to get in - then they say hello to Gaston.

I have been a squaddie, a UK plod, I know some US plods [and in three years I want to be a US plod] and from the experience I have of speaking to victims it is difficult to evade a home invasion. You've got to have a plan to deal with it and that plan should concentrate on the protection of life - forget property, you can replace property, you can't replace your 5 year old.

Burglaries are different. Most people don't even know they have been burgled until they have woken up, washed dressed and then find a turd or puddle of piss in their living room where the intruder had to let go. Its scary though, knowing that someone was in the house and you did not know. Stick up a couple of extra locks and security lights, especially with the lead up to xmas, and you reduce the chances of anything happening.

Edit: For the more delicate amongst you, it is not uncommon to find a turd or puddle of piss at the scene of a burglary. The most insulting part for the house owner is the fact that when it is a turd the dirty git has wiped his arse on the best drapes or table cloth ........ good for DNA matching though.
 
#13
Burglaries are different. Most people don't even know they have been burgled until they have woken up, washed dressed and then find a turd or puddle of piss in their living room where the intruder had to let go. Its scary though, knowing that someone was in the house and you did not know. Stick up a couple of extra locks and security lights, especially with the lead up to xmas, and you reduce the chances of anything happening.
I've got a perimeter CCTV with HDD recording system. It's also got motion detection and anything bigger than a dog moves in the garden and it sounds an alarm indoors. Great bit of kit, it can even be set to ring my mobile with a video link if something is detected when I'm away. Wife loves it, it goes bleep and she can look at the CCTV monitor and see who's coming to the fromt door when she's home and I'm out.
 
#14
I've got a perimeter CCTV with HDD recording system. It's also got motion detection and anything bigger than a dog moves in the garden and it sounds an alarm indoors. Great bit of kit, it can even be set to ring my mobile with a video link if something is detected when I'm away. Wife loves it, it goes bleep and she can look at the CCTV monitor and see who's coming to the fromt door when she's home and I'm out.
Good drills, I have a similar widget looking past the side garage down the driveway.

Believe it or not, back to beating my crime prevention drum, CCTV is still in its infancy in the US. Nothing like the coverage and usage that there is in the UK.

It is considered an infringement of their freedom here. I worked with Tampa plod some years ago and we were talking about basic crime control measures like CCTV. They told me that they put a load of cameras up and had to take them down again after privacy complaints.

What works well is using a motion detector to set off a flashing light and siren - not too loud. The psychological effect on a domestic burglar is amazing they almost have a bowel release and then leg it.
 
#15
"Effendi" quote & snipped for relevance, "Florida is no problem. They have what is called a castle doctrine, this means if they set foot in your home you can shoot them. Add to that the fact that Florida has a no-retreat policy, this means you do not have to attempt to avoid conflict. Some States demand that you retreat until you can go no further before you may engage a target........errr, defend your family and yourself is what I meant. Add to that the fact that most grannies when they retire here buy themselves a .38 special for their bedside table and handbag qnd burglars just don't want to risk it.

My cousin, a serving officer who just happened to be on his units pistol shooting team, was posted to our embassy in Washington DC, many moons ago. He rented a house just outside the City in Virginia, taking his 9 m/m Browning with him. As he had declared this & was on the diplomatic staff he was visited by a State Policeman to check up on it. When the Policemen asked where he kept the weapon he replied it was safely locked up in a secure cabinet! The Policeman laughed and told him to keep it somewhere handy like on the bedside cabinet as if anyone broke in he was entitled to shoot them, he also advised to shoot to kill as "dead men dont tell tales"!
 
#16
Edit: For the more delicate amongst you, it is not uncommon to find a turd or puddle of piss at the scene of a burglary. The most insulting part for the house owner is the fact that when it is a turd the dirty git has wiped his arse on the best drapes or table cloth ........ good for DNA matching though.
They left cigarette ash all over my place. Pissed me off at the time, but seems I got off lucky.
 
#17
Many single storey homes in the US have what is called a split plan design. That means the parents room is away from the kids room so that they don't hear the occasional bedroom athletic events. Then you have a 3 way split allowing for a guest room to be seperate from the other areas. These kind of designs creates a defence problem should anything ever happen. We have a 3 way split, our SOP is that wife goes to child in one area and I go the child in the other area moving through the main living area clearing it as I move. Yes, we both have pistols with lights fitted - Glock 17 and 19.
...
Interesting but brave and you seem to have divided your forces. You also might be blocking the exit of multiple armed perps intent on cutting extremities off for the safe combination with just that dinky plastic pistol, I'd be kecking myself.

I was thinking of just popping a couple of bursts of 7.62 into the bedroom floor while swearing loudly in Mexican about the safety catch as a signal for everyone to bail out their windows AKs in hand. We can then regroup in the back yard tunnel system providing interlocking fields of fire on likely exits.

Cousin Cletus, a prudent but not sportin man, suggested taking no chances just hosing the whole cabin down with the .50 BMG but I think there may be legal problems with that and the insurance might not cover any damage Ma's vintage scalp collection.

Disappointingly The Twins prefer this one to sacrificing themselves to cover Papa Bear's exit. Ma reckons we brought them girls up wrong.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#19
There is a guy called Massad Ayoob, a septic police Captain, who teaches a course intended for the armed. Not only does he cover the practical elements of shooting he addresses dealing with violent encounters, dealing with the police post encounter and also how to manage yourself with lawyers after an incident. He has many Judges and Lawyers who attend his course to learn about the practicalities of citizen involved defensive shootings. His bottomline advice is, "If someone is breaking into your house and you shoot them either wait until they are in the window or if they fall back out of the window drag them back in the window".
Have you taken any of Mas' courses ?
His view is quite the opposite.
 
#20
...As stated "peaceful" burglars would normally target empty properties in preference to occupied ones so that fact that you are at home should be enough to suggest a more malicious intent or, at the very least, a dangerous level of desperation.
A lot of burglary is pretty random and carried out by teenage boys with little preparation or wit. They'll go for empty properties but will make mistakes fairly frequently. If confronted they can sometimes be lethal of course.

I knew a fella who claimed he actually preferred to have folks asleep in the house as then he knew where they were and would even work their bedrooms. Early career scrapes with folk returning set this pattern. He clearly enjoyed his work a great deal, I'd say to the point of addiction. I would not describe the bugger as "peaceful" either he was just confident in his stealth and that he could deal violently with situation were it failed him.

Home invasions are classically more like a bank robbery carried out on a domestic scene, multiple perps often well armed and with a rudimentary plan.

There's an FBI description in Violent Crime Hits Home: Home Invasion Robbery
...
Contrasting Criminal Profiles

In most cases, residential burglars attempt to avoid confronting victims. They tend to probe carefully and to make covert entry at the side or rear of a residence, using available cover. Burglars generally prefer to work alone, and most target unoccupied dwellings. Most incidents of burglary do not result in violence, even when the burglar is discovered. When violence does occur, it often results from the offender's frantic attempt to escape.

Burglars wear dark clothing and gloves and carry prying tools. In addition, burglars must deal with a multitude of potential threats, such as increasingly sophisticated alarm systems, metal bars on doors and windows, guard dogs, and neighborhood watch groups. Not knowing the homeowners' whereabouts causes additional anxiety. Burglary is, for the most part, a stealth crime that depends on opportunity.

In contrast, confrontation generally is considered the key element in home invasion robberies. Home invaders prefer to make direct entry into a targeted residence. In fact, the entry is often dynamic--relying on sheer force, false pretense, or various forms of impersonation. The violence associated with home invasion robbery generally occurs during the initial confrontation with victims, in order to establish control quickly and to limit the likelihood of later identification by the victims. However, mounting evidence suggests that many home invaders enjoy the intimidation, domination, and violence of the offense. Unlike the majority of burglars, home invaders carry items that connote control and confrontation, such as firearms, handcuffs, masks, and tape. Because the threat level inside a residence rarely is known in advance, the offense almost always is committed by more than one offender. These offenders often develop well-organized plans and divide specific tasks among themselves. One or more of the home invaders usually control the victims while the other offenders systematically ransack the residence. Home invaders usually target the resident, not the residence. They may make their selection in a variety of ways, often choosing women, senior citizens, or drug dealers.

Moreover, home invasion robbery provides offenders with many criminal advantages. First, they are able to alter their plans in a moment if they sense that conditions are not right at the point of confrontation. Rather than suspiciously probing around a residence, they can pull their vehicle into the driveway as if they belong there. This simple tactic often causes potential witnesses to look the other way, unaware that their neighbors are in peril.

Home invaders do not have to overcome residential alarm systems, because most systems will not be activated while the residence is occupied. Further, once offenders take control of a residence, they can force victims to open safes, locate hidden valuables, and provide additional information, as needed. And, because they generally leave victims bound or incapacitated, offenders can rely on an ample period of time to escape from the crime scene.
...
Dick Turpin had a very similar MO but the modern US version grew out of what the Aussies call toecutters preying on sometimes well protected drug dealers. They then diversified out to far softer targets in the general public.

If something goes bump in the night you probably have a bad burglar at work and the risks of confronting them armed with just a handgun are perhaps unnecessary but acceptable. If it's a home invasion kicking down your door you better have God on your side because the firepower likely won't be.

It's pretty common crime in Mexico, at the moment and a mate tells me it is regarded as practically suicidal to offer resistance even if you are well armed, they'll just kill the whole family.
 

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