Home Buying and Ground Subsidence.

#1
We are very seriously looking at moving out of West London in about twelve months time. There are a number of reasons for this. I'm sixty three this year and I'm currently semi retired. My wife is five years younger than me and will keep working for a few years more but she's a registered nurse and as such will most likely get a job anywhere that we move to. This part of West London is being developed enormously. They knock a pub or a warehouse or whatever down and almost straight away, there are blocks of flats sprouting up. Many parts of the place I've lived in all my life apart from when I was in the army have changed completely and not for the better. In my view, it's massive overdevelopment without any regard for social amenities and I just think it's not going to be that pleasant to live here much longer.

Happily, Crossrail is almost complete and that's good news for us. We are about a mile north of Heathrow (another reason for moving with a third runway looking a sure thing) and Crossrail will link between Canary Wharf and Heathrow with the journey taking about forty minutes. West Drayton is going to be one of the main stations on the new line and the effect on property prices around here has been enormous. I have a 3 bedroomed house and the current value is well in excess of £400,000. I wonder where it will be in another years time?

We are almost certainly going down to the North Devon area. We've made a couple of visits last year and we're planning some more this year when the weather improves. We haven't entirely ruled out other parts of the UK though. I occasionally sit down and examine Google Maps looking at various locations. Over the years, I've travelled to most parts of the UK or through it so I can relate to a lot of the places I see on the map.

In June 1993, I had occasion to travel to Scarborough for a conference. Scarborough impressed me because I'd been to a few conferences in the past at Blackpool and Scarborough was a refreshingly clean and friendly place in comparison to Blackpool. At Scarborough from up the hill, you could even see lines in the sand where they combed the sandy beach every morning which was nice because my wife and three then quite young children were accompanying me.

It was also a particularly newsworthy time for Scarborough because one of their clifftop hotels, Holbeck Hall, fell down a steep embankment into the sea. I did pop along late one afternoon to have a look and joined the small group of people who likewise had walked up there to observe the few remaining parts of the building still standing where they had been since it was built in 1879.

Obligingly while I was stood there taking in the spectacle, another large chunk broke off and slid down the steep incline which had been created where the hotel garden had previously been situated. After watching for around twenty minutes, I returned back to our small rented flat glad that I wasn't in a clifftop hotel for the week.

So this morning I was thinking of the North of the UK and I thought about the Scarborough area and got Google Maps going. I was a little curious about Holbeck Hall as well. After all this time, what did the place look like now. I assumed they hadn't rebuilt anything on the site and a quick Google on the subject revealed that there were ongoing issues with land movement on the coastal parts of that area.

Imagine my surprise then when I zoomed done to Google street scene and slap bang next to where the hotel used to be, there is temporary hoarding along the road with advertising on them proclaiming a new development of flats!

Groundwork used to be my game so I know a little bit about it. I'm not qualified but when you've been doing something for a dozen years or so, you pick up a lot of what's required so I'm knowledgeable about footings and some of the associated stuff like underpinning etc. I am also curious about how these new flats in Scarborough being built slap bang next to where a large building collapsed into the sea are going to be built particularly with regard to how they are going to stop a reoccurrence of the previous event in 1993.

I can say one definite fact. I wouldn't live in one of them. There are other issues such as will people be able to get a mortgage on one of them etc and will there be any guarantees in the event of problems (highly doubtful). Will this development be actually saleable? It's a place where a catastrophic event happened not that long ago really and there are ongoing issues with ground movement.

So does anybody have any experience of any similar situations anywhere and what remedies were available apart from watching your lifetime investment collapsing into a hole in the ground?
 
#2
We are very seriously looking at moving out of West London in about twelve months time. There are a number of reasons for this. I'm sixty three this year and I'm currently semi retired. My wife is five years younger than me and will keep working for a few years more but she's a registered nurse and as such will most likely get a job anywhere that we move to. This part of West London is being developed enormously. They knock a pub or a warehouse or whatever down and almost straight away, there are blocks of flats sprouting up. Many parts of the place I've lived in all my life apart from when I was in the army have changed completely and not for the better. In my view, it's massive overdevelopment without any regard for social amenities and I just think it's not going to be that pleasant to live here much longer.

Happily, Crossrail is almost complete and that's good news for us. We are about a mile north of Heathrow (another reason for moving with a third runway looking a sure thing) and Crossrail will link between Canary Wharf and Heathrow with the journey taking about forty minutes. West Drayton is going to be one of the main stations on the new line and the effect on property prices around here has been enormous. I have a 3 bedroomed house and the current value is well in excess of £400,000. I wonder where it will be in another years time?

We are almost certainly going down to the North Devon area. We've made a couple of visits last year and we're planning some more this year when the weather improves. We haven't entirely ruled out other parts of the UK though. I occasionally sit down and examine Google Maps looking at various locations. Over the years, I've travelled to most parts of the UK or through it so I can relate to a lot of the places I see on the map.

In June 1993, I had occasion to travel to Scarborough for a conference. Scarborough impressed me because I'd been to a few conferences in the past at Blackpool and Scarborough was a refreshingly clean and friendly place in comparison to Blackpool. At Scarborough from up the hill, you could even see lines in the sand where they combed the sandy beach every morning which was nice because my wife and three then quite young children were accompanying me.

It was also a particularly newsworthy time for Scarborough because one of their clifftop hotels, Holbeck Hall, fell down a steep embankment into the sea. I did pop along late one afternoon to have a look and joined the small group of people who likewise had walked up there to observe the few remaining parts of the building still standing where they had been since it was built in 1879.

Obligingly while I was stood there taking in the spectacle, another large chunk broke off and slid down the steep incline which had been created where the hotel garden had previously been situated. After watching for around twenty minutes, I returned back to our small rented flat glad that I wasn't in a clifftop hotel for the week.

So this morning I was thinking of the North of the UK and I thought about the Scarborough area and got Google Maps going. I was a little curious about Holbeck Hall as well. After all this time, what did the place look like now. I assumed they hadn't rebuilt anything on the site and a quick Google on the subject revealed that there were ongoing issues with land movement on the coastal parts of that area.

Imagine my surprise then when I zoomed done to Google street scene and slap bang next to where the hotel used to be, there is temporary hoarding along the road with advertising on them proclaiming a new development of flats!

Groundwork used to be my game so I know a little bit about it. I'm not qualified but when you've been doing something for a dozen years or so, you pick up a lot of what's required so I'm knowledgeable about footings and some of the associated stuff like underpinning etc. I am also curious about how these new flats in Scarborough being built slap bang next to where a large building collapsed into the sea are going to be built particularly with regard to how they are going to stop a reoccurrence of the previous event in 1993.

I can say one definite fact. I wouldn't live in one of them. There are other issues such as will people be able to get a mortgage on one of them etc and will there be any guarantees in the event of problems (highly doubtful). Will this development be actually saleable? It's a place where a catastrophic event happened not that long ago really and there are ongoing issues with ground movement.

So does anybody have any experience of any similar situations anywhere and what remedies were available apart from watching your lifetime investment collapsing into a hole in the ground?
I work on a Petrochemical plant on Teesside and whilst the Site has seen many closures of Plants the village adjacent to us has seen lots of new house building in recent years, this has led to increased and vocal complaints everytime a safety system shuts the plant down leading to an extremely bright and noisy flare for several hours. As the plant pre dates the houses surely if this will disturb you then don't buy a house there surely.
 
#3
We are very seriously looking at moving out of West London in about twelve months time. There are a number of reasons for this. I'm sixty three this year and I'm currently semi retired. My wife is five years younger than me and will keep working for a few years more but she's a registered nurse and as such will most likely get a job anywhere that we move to. This part of West London is being developed enormously. They knock a pub or a warehouse or whatever down and almost straight away, there are blocks of flats sprouting up. Many parts of the place I've lived in all my life apart from when I was in the army have changed completely and not for the better. In my view, it's massive overdevelopment without any regard for social amenities and I just think it's not going to be that pleasant to live here much longer.

Happily, Crossrail is almost complete and that's good news for us. We are about a mile north of Heathrow (another reason for moving with a third runway looking a sure thing) and Crossrail will link between Canary Wharf and Heathrow with the journey taking about forty minutes. West Drayton is going to be one of the main stations on the new line and the effect on property prices around here has been enormous. I have a 3 bedroomed house and the current value is well in excess of £400,000. I wonder where it will be in another years time?

We are almost certainly going down to the North Devon area. We've made a couple of visits last year and we're planning some more this year when the weather improves. We haven't entirely ruled out other parts of the UK though. I occasionally sit down and examine Google Maps looking at various locations. Over the years, I've travelled to most parts of the UK or through it so I can relate to a lot of the places I see on the map.

In June 1993, I had occasion to travel to Scarborough for a conference. Scarborough impressed me because I'd been to a few conferences in the past at Blackpool and Scarborough was a refreshingly clean and friendly place in comparison to Blackpool. At Scarborough from up the hill, you could even see lines in the sand where they combed the sandy beach every morning which was nice because my wife and three then quite young children were accompanying me.

It was also a particularly newsworthy time for Scarborough because one of their clifftop hotels, Holbeck Hall, fell down a steep embankment into the sea. I did pop along late one afternoon to have a look and joined the small group of people who likewise had walked up there to observe the few remaining parts of the building still standing where they had been since it was built in 1879.

Obligingly while I was stood there taking in the spectacle, another large chunk broke off and slid down the steep incline which had been created where the hotel garden had previously been situated. After watching for around twenty minutes, I returned back to our small rented flat glad that I wasn't in a clifftop hotel for the week.

So this morning I was thinking of the North of the UK and I thought about the Scarborough area and got Google Maps going. I was a little curious about Holbeck Hall as well. After all this time, what did the place look like now. I assumed they hadn't rebuilt anything on the site and a quick Google on the subject revealed that there were ongoing issues with land movement on the coastal parts of that area.

Imagine my surprise then when I zoomed done to Google street scene and slap bang next to where the hotel used to be, there is temporary hoarding along the road with advertising on them proclaiming a new development of flats!

Groundwork used to be my game so I know a little bit about it. I'm not qualified but when you've been doing something for a dozen years or so, you pick up a lot of what's required so I'm knowledgeable about footings and some of the associated stuff like underpinning etc. I am also curious about how these new flats in Scarborough being built slap bang next to where a large building collapsed into the sea are going to be built particularly with regard to how they are going to stop a reoccurrence of the previous event in 1993.

I can say one definite fact. I wouldn't live in one of them. There are other issues such as will people be able to get a mortgage on one of them etc and will there be any guarantees in the event of problems (highly doubtful). Will this development be actually saleable? It's a place where a catastrophic event happened not that long ago really and there are ongoing issues with ground movement.

So does anybody have any experience of any similar situations anywhere and what remedies were available apart from watching your lifetime investment collapsing into a hole in the ground?
Answer:-Move inland.
 
#4
We are very seriously looking at moving out of West London in about twelve months time. There are a number of reasons for this. I'm sixty three this year and I'm currently semi retired. My wife is five years younger than me and will keep working for a few years more but she's a registered nurse and as such will most likely get a job anywhere that we move to. This part of West London is being developed enormously. They knock a pub or a warehouse or whatever down and almost straight away, there are blocks of flats sprouting up. Many parts of the place I've lived in all my life apart from when I was in the army have changed completely and not for the better. In my view, it's massive overdevelopment without any regard for social amenities and I just think it's not going to be that pleasant to live here much longer.

Happily, Crossrail is almost complete and that's good news for us. We are about a mile north of Heathrow (another reason for moving with a third runway looking a sure thing) and Crossrail will link between Canary Wharf and Heathrow with the journey taking about forty minutes. West Drayton is going to be one of the main stations on the new line and the effect on property prices around here has been enormous. I have a 3 bedroomed house and the current value is well in excess of £400,000. I wonder where it will be in another years time?

We are almost certainly going down to the North Devon area. We've made a couple of visits last year and we're planning some more this year when the weather improves. We haven't entirely ruled out other parts of the UK though. I occasionally sit down and examine Google Maps looking at various locations. Over the years, I've travelled to most parts of the UK or through it so I can relate to a lot of the places I see on the map.

In June 1993, I had occasion to travel to Scarborough for a conference. Scarborough impressed me because I'd been to a few conferences in the past at Blackpool and Scarborough was a refreshingly clean and friendly place in comparison to Blackpool. At Scarborough from up the hill, you could even see lines in the sand where they combed the sandy beach every morning which was nice because my wife and three then quite young children were accompanying me.

It was also a particularly newsworthy time for Scarborough because one of their clifftop hotels, Holbeck Hall, fell down a steep embankment into the sea. I did pop along late one afternoon to have a look and joined the small group of people who likewise had walked up there to observe the few remaining parts of the building still standing where they had been since it was built in 1879.

Obligingly while I was stood there taking in the spectacle, another large chunk broke off and slid down the steep incline which had been created where the hotel garden had previously been situated. After watching for around twenty minutes, I returned back to our small rented flat glad that I wasn't in a clifftop hotel for the week.

So this morning I was thinking of the North of the UK and I thought about the Scarborough area and got Google Maps going. I was a little curious about Holbeck Hall as well. After all this time, what did the place look like now. I assumed they hadn't rebuilt anything on the site and a quick Google on the subject revealed that there were ongoing issues with land movement on the coastal parts of that area.

Imagine my surprise then when I zoomed done to Google street scene and slap bang next to where the hotel used to be, there is temporary hoarding along the road with advertising on them proclaiming a new development of flats!

Groundwork used to be my game so I know a little bit about it. I'm not qualified but when you've been doing something for a dozen years or so, you pick up a lot of what's required so I'm knowledgeable about footings and some of the associated stuff like underpinning etc. I am also curious about how these new flats in Scarborough being built slap bang next to where a large building collapsed into the sea are going to be built particularly with regard to how they are going to stop a reoccurrence of the previous event in 1993.

I can say one definite fact. I wouldn't live in one of them. There are other issues such as will people be able to get a mortgage on one of them etc and will there be any guarantees in the event of problems (highly doubtful). Will this development be actually saleable? It's a place where a catastrophic event happened not that long ago really and there are ongoing issues with ground movement.

So does anybody have any experience of any similar situations anywhere and what remedies were available apart from watching your lifetime investment collapsing into a hole in the ground?
TLDR
Could you summarise in one short sentence?
 
#5
Avoid anything with subsidence issues like the plague ... if you can.
Not always easy with mining subsidence, or land heave and swell from tree roots, coastal erosion .. or red shale in foundations.
Come to think it, it must be simpler to take to the road or live in a tent.
Certainly it doesn't instil confidence in securing mortgages or can throw a spanner in the works for anyone considering Equity Release in their later years when they'd hoped property had been a good investment
 
#6
We are very seriously looking at moving out of West London in about twelve months time. There are a number of reasons for this. I'm sixty three this year and I'm currently semi retired. My wife is five years younger than me and will keep working for a few years more but she's a registered nurse and as such will most likely get a job anywhere that we move to. This part of West London is being developed enormously. They knock a pub or a warehouse or whatever down and almost straight away, there are blocks of flats sprouting up. Many parts of the place I've lived in all my life apart from when I was in the army have changed completely and not for the better. In my view, it's massive overdevelopment without any regard for social amenities and I just think it's not going to be that pleasant to live here much longer.

Happily, Crossrail is almost complete and that's good news for us. We are about a mile north of Heathrow (another reason for moving with a third runway looking a sure thing) and Crossrail will link between Canary Wharf and Heathrow with the journey taking about forty minutes. West Drayton is going to be one of the main stations on the new line and the effect on property prices around here has been enormous. I have a 3 bedroomed house and the current value is well in excess of £400,000. I wonder where it will be in another years time?

We are almost certainly going down to the North Devon area. We've made a couple of visits last year and we're planning some more this year when the weather improves. We haven't entirely ruled out other parts of the UK though. I occasionally sit down and examine Google Maps looking at various locations. Over the years, I've travelled to most parts of the UK or through it so I can relate to a lot of the places I see on the map.

In June 1993, I had occasion to travel to Scarborough for a conference. Scarborough impressed me because I'd been to a few conferences in the past at Blackpool and Scarborough was a refreshingly clean and friendly place in comparison to Blackpool. At Scarborough from up the hill, you could even see lines in the sand where they combed the sandy beach every morning which was nice because my wife and three then quite young children were accompanying me.

It was also a particularly newsworthy time for Scarborough because one of their clifftop hotels, Holbeck Hall, fell down a steep embankment into the sea. I did pop along late one afternoon to have a look and joined the small group of people who likewise had walked up there to observe the few remaining parts of the building still standing where they had been since it was built in 1879.

Obligingly while I was stood there taking in the spectacle, another large chunk broke off and slid down the steep incline which had been created where the hotel garden had previously been situated. After watching for around twenty minutes, I returned back to our small rented flat glad that I wasn't in a clifftop hotel for the week.

So this morning I was thinking of the North of the UK and I thought about the Scarborough area and got Google Maps going. I was a little curious about Holbeck Hall as well. After all this time, what did the place look like now. I assumed they hadn't rebuilt anything on the site and a quick Google on the subject revealed that there were ongoing issues with land movement on the coastal parts of that area.

Imagine my surprise then when I zoomed done to Google street scene and slap bang next to where the hotel used to be, there is temporary hoarding along the road with advertising on them proclaiming a new development of flats!

Groundwork used to be my game so I know a little bit about it. I'm not qualified but when you've been doing something for a dozen years or so, you pick up a lot of what's required so I'm knowledgeable about footings and some of the associated stuff like underpinning etc. I am also curious about how these new flats in Scarborough being built slap bang next to where a large building collapsed into the sea are going to be built particularly with regard to how they are going to stop a reoccurrence of the previous event in 1993.

I can say one definite fact. I wouldn't live in one of them. There are other issues such as will people be able to get a mortgage on one of them etc and will there be any guarantees in the event of problems (highly doubtful). Will this development be actually saleable? It's a place where a catastrophic event happened not that long ago really and there are ongoing issues with ground movement.

So does anybody have any experience of any similar situations anywhere and what remedies were available apart from watching your lifetime investment collapsing into a hole in the ground?
I really don't know any of the technicalities involved but referring to your question, 'will this development be saleable?', it is as certain as eggs are eggs that the developers have done their research, satisfied building requirements in every respect, have donated a new school crossing/local library whatever to the council and will make a handsome profit on it all.
 
#7
Weirdly, I've just got back from visiting a new housing development in dat dere sunny sarf lunden were there was massive subsidence due to the the builders puting up a lovely new brookside type close ....and a few months after the new tenants moved in, sink holes started to appear - 48 tenants moved out rapido , new homes bought or rented by their Housing provider at the cost of half a mill plus .

Seems that when builder was boring pilots holes for ground samples they hit something hard ...ah, that'll be bedrock then, ..er no, that actually was the roof on the old mines.

My Bods have the simple job of realigning the guttering and reforming the joints that have moved due to the subsidence.

However, x amounts of tenants are very happy where they now are and do not want to moved back to, what is in their mind, a still dodgy area..... can't say i blame them

All part of the fun

UPDATE: 48 residents evacuated after sinkhole opens up in Plumstead
 

DieHard

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
We are very seriously looking at moving out of West London in about twelve months time. There are a number of reasons for this. I'm sixty three this year and I'm currently semi retired. My wife is five years younger than me and will keep working for a few years more but she's a registered nurse and as such will most likely get a job anywhere that we move to. This part of West London is being developed enormously. They knock a pub or a warehouse or whatever down and almost straight away, there are blocks of flats sprouting up. Many parts of the place I've lived in all my life apart from when I was in the army have changed completely and not for the better. In my view, it's massive overdevelopment without any regard for social amenities and I just think it's not going to be that pleasant to live here much longer.

Happily, Crossrail is almost complete and that's good news for us. We are about a mile north of Heathrow (another reason for moving with a third runway looking a sure thing) and Crossrail will link between Canary Wharf and Heathrow with the journey taking about forty minutes. West Drayton is going to be one of the main stations on the new line and the effect on property prices around here has been enormous. I have a 3 bedroomed house and the current value is well in excess of £400,000. I wonder where it will be in another years time?

We are almost certainly going down to the North Devon area. We've made a couple of visits last year and we're planning some more this year when the weather improves. We haven't entirely ruled out other parts of the UK though. I occasionally sit down and examine Google Maps looking at various locations. Over the years, I've travelled to most parts of the UK or through it so I can relate to a lot of the places I see on the map.

In June 1993, I had occasion to travel to Scarborough for a conference. Scarborough impressed me because I'd been to a few conferences in the past at Blackpool and Scarborough was a refreshingly clean and friendly place in comparison to Blackpool. At Scarborough from up the hill, you could even see lines in the sand where they combed the sandy beach every morning which was nice because my wife and three then quite young children were accompanying me.

It was also a particularly newsworthy time for Scarborough because one of their clifftop hotels, Holbeck Hall, fell down a steep embankment into the sea. I did pop along late one afternoon to have a look and joined the small group of people who likewise had walked up there to observe the few remaining parts of the building still standing where they had been since it was built in 1879.

Obligingly while I was stood there taking in the spectacle, another large chunk broke off and slid down the steep incline which had been created where the hotel garden had previously been situated. After watching for around twenty minutes, I returned back to our small rented flat glad that I wasn't in a clifftop hotel for the week.

So this morning I was thinking of the North of the UK and I thought about the Scarborough area and got Google Maps going. I was a little curious about Holbeck Hall as well. After all this time, what did the place look like now. I assumed they hadn't rebuilt anything on the site and a quick Google on the subject revealed that there were ongoing issues with land movement on the coastal parts of that area.

Imagine my surprise then when I zoomed done to Google street scene and slap bang next to where the hotel used to be, there is temporary hoarding along the road with advertising on them proclaiming a new development of flats!

Groundwork used to be my game so I know a little bit about it. I'm not qualified but when you've been doing something for a dozen years or so, you pick up a lot of what's required so I'm knowledgeable about footings and some of the associated stuff like underpinning etc. I am also curious about how these new flats in Scarborough being built slap bang next to where a large building collapsed into the sea are going to be built particularly with regard to how they are going to stop a reoccurrence of the previous event in 1993.

I can say one definite fact. I wouldn't live in one of them. There are other issues such as will people be able to get a mortgage on one of them etc and will there be any guarantees in the event of problems (highly doubtful). Will this development be actually saleable? It's a place where a catastrophic event happened not that long ago really and there are ongoing issues with ground movement.

So does anybody have any experience of any similar situations anywhere and what remedies were available apart from watching your lifetime investment collapsing into a hole in the ground?
Judging by your pour post i would assume you live in or close to Hayes, my hometown and now a complete melting pot of shite.
I live in bedfordshire now in Houghton Regis and they, centrl Bedfordshire council, are planning on building 2 new towns near jct 11a near my house. As a ruke its fairly nice here with plenty of places for country walks.
I believe that some form of discount is on offer to buy a house, if your tempted i would Google and ask the council.
If the houses planned are withon a couple if miles from my place then it would be at the too end of a valley with no problems with subsidence, unlike a beautiful house we put an offer on in luton, it would of costs £20,000 to fix in 1998.
 
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