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Holy Moley

#1
From today D/Telegraph
Holy Ghost too spooky for children, teachers told
By David Sapsted
(Filed: 11/04/2005)

Teachers are being told not to mention that Communion bread and wine represent the body and blood of Christ in case children get it in their heads that Christians are cannibals.

New guidelines for religious education teachers also want them to refer to the Holy Spirit rather than the Holy Ghost because the latter implies "a trivial and spooky concept of the third person in the Trinity".

The guidelines, drawn up by education chiefs in Norfolk and condemned by the National Union of Teachers yesterday as "modernism gone mad", also consign the term Old Testament to the dustbin because pupils may believe it means its contents are no longer relevant.

Christians are not alone in having the terms of their faith redefined. In teaching Judaism, teachers are told to refer to the "Western Wall" rather than "Wailing Wall", just in case the children believe that Jews are moaners.

Muslims should not be shown in photographs "holding swords, Kalashnikovs, etc" to avoid Islam being equated to terrorism.

Also out are pictures of Hindu holy men caked in mud because they give the impression that it is a religion for "weirdos or masochists".

As for Sikhs, the guidance says: "Do be careful when showing pupils the kachs. Without preparing pupils, they seem to some like merely voluminous underpants and can give rise to a poor response."

The guidelines for the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education will go to the ''cabinet'' of Norfolk County Council for approval this week with the aim of introducing them in the autumn.

Marian Agombar, the chairman of the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus Conference, said that the guidelines had been drawn up after looking at best practice in other education authorities. She said that teachers would not be forced to follow the advice.

"It's just a useful thing to help teachers prevent making mistakes," she told the Norwich Evening News.

Tony Mulgrew, the Norfolk secretary for the NUT, thought the exercise had the ring of political correctness.

"I just think it's a bit daft to suddenly change the name of the Old Testament. They shouldn't be messing about with the names of things. It's modernism gone mad."

Nick Seaton, the chairman of the Campaign for Real Education, a pressure group for higher standards and greater parental choice, said: "I think most people will think it's ridiculous. It's just another example of political correctness interfering with the education system."
Nurse! Sick bucket please.
 
#2
Is anyone else DEEPLY concerned about what those brainless imbeciles in charge of childrens' education is doing to the next generation (not Star Trek)?

The major influences on a child's 'fragile little mind' seem to be TV, Playstation, idiot left-wing no hopers who can't cut it in the real world (aka teachers) and their amazingly stupid chav school friends. An overworked, stressed parent sacrificing his/her time to pay a mortgage worthy of Louis XVI cannot hope to compete with this Playground Axis of Evil.

Or am I being paranoid?
 
#3
Damn*! There goes my whole belief system!

In teaching Judaism, teachers are told to refer to the "Western Wall" rather than "Wailing Wall", just in case the children believe that Jews are moaners.
They aren't?

Muslims should not be shown in photographs "holding swords, Kalashnikovs, etc" to avoid Islam being equated to terrorism.
Isn't it??

Also out are pictures of Hindu holy men caked in mud because they give the impression that it is a religion for "weirdos or masochists".
Does this mean that the www.army.mod.uk website will also be proscribed?

As for Sikhs, the guidance says: "Do be careful when showing pupils the kachs. Without preparing pupils, they seem to some like merely voluminous underpants and can give rise to a poor response."
Oh no! Kids finding things amusing! STOP THEM!

"It's just a useful thing to help teachers prevent making mistakes," she told the Norwich Evening News.
Do they need this support that badly? Is this the area where they make most mistakes? Are we to assume that teachers are perfect in all other areas?

*Now banned. I meant 'Shucks!' of course.
 
#4
No not paranoid, they are out to get everyone. I am glad I don't subscribe to this kind of mindless sh1t but I fear for my sisters children as they are at the age where chavdom is just around the corner, the town is bordering on Chav central, one parent doesn't give a fcuk about what the kids are being taught and niether have interest of moving to save the children from this.

As far as the article is concerned, the Teaachers union have condemed them as "Modernisation gone mad".
 
#5
A serious problem is the fact that the teaching of Religious Studies, Citizenship etc etc (I forget the correct name of the subject) is left to the newbie teachers. My sister, gawd bless her naive socks, is a teacher and explains how these lessons become basically 'jiff-jobs' - anyone of the new teachers with space in their schedules is jiffed with doing them, or whomever stays too long in the staff room.

In her exact words: "how am I supposed to teach a class of bored 15 year olds about the tenets of Islam or Hinduism with 15 minutes preparation?"

they have these vu-foil packs that are written for (and probably by) the mentally deficient providing a numpty's guide to <insert: Religion / Citizenship / Human Rights / Democracy / Society / Why Mugging OAPs is Bad etc>

that's how the kids are learning about these things, from ill-prepared, inexperienced teachers working from inadequate source material. Being teachers, they are prone to pad the lessons out with 'opinion' (ie what they learn't from the Daily Mail/Express - eg. "Princess Diana (Queen of Hearts) really liked the funny elephant god from Hinduism" or "Princess Diana (Queen of Loveliness) didn't like the birqua because it stopped people seeing her pretty toes")

Massive localised unemployment (eg Longbridge) + poor immigration policy + utter, state sponsored ignorance of religion and culture on all sides are going to make the next 20 years a REALLY interesting chapter in UK history. Can't wait.

Jeez I'm angry today. Sorry :oops:
 
#6
RTFQ said:
Princess Diana (Queen of Loveliness) didn't like the birqua because it stopped people seeing her pretty toes)
They could have bent over a long way...unless the 'Princess of all Our Hearts' had toes growing out of her head...which would certainly explain a few things.

Anyway, I agree - this sort of nannying really pi$$es me off as well. If I want to label all Jews as moaning gits, and all Muslims as towel headed bomb-happy lunatics, then I bloody well shall.

Just not in Army time **ahem ahem**
 
#10
RTFQ said:
A serious problem is the fact that the teaching of Religious Studies, Citizenship etc etc (I forget the correct name of the subject) is left to the newbie teachers. My sister, gawd bless her naive socks, is a teacher and explains how these lessons become basically 'jiff-jobs' - anyone of the new teachers with space in their schedules is jiffed with doing them, or whomever stays too long in the staff room.
My darling ‘woolly-minded-liberal’ older sister no longer teaches, though is still 'in' education, and whilst she was teaching (primary) was made Head of Literacy (her specialty) and somewhat bizarrely, Head of Religious Education (she’d not studied it since age 13 & as I recall she decided at age 11 that all religion was bollox). She too had to teach from these politically-correct 'fact packs' and hated it with a passion.
 
#11
Whatever happened to our Anglo-saxon society? 8O

Does anyone care when our sensibilities are offended? :?

The education system is an ongoing experiment anyway - without a control or a clear objective. If I have kids they will be going private and I'll live of Beans on Toast if I have to! :twisted: :twisted:
 
#12
Unfortunately, private does not necessarily mean better Loggie, my sis is at a private school. A pretty damn expensive one. It may not have the overwhelming scale of the problems seen in some state schools, but ALL the problems are still there - inadequate teachers, lack of funds, violence amongst the kids and towards teachers, wishy washy 'initiatives' and fads, ritilin-anaethetised pseudo-kids. By no means is it an anglo saxon stronghold either, it's all demographic-related, there are large parts of the asian/african/ME community that have, by hard work or inheritance, a significant amount of personal wealth. Their emphasis on providing a good education for their children means that those who can, certainly don't send their kids to inner city state schools. You only have to look at the mixed population of any school now to realise how multi cultural this country is going to become in the next decade or two. This brings me back to my original point - cultural and religious studies need to be a meaningful and erudite experience, not a long-haired tree hugging plea to 'just love each other and listen to bob dylan' because the kids won't buy it.
 
#14
Perhaps if the teachers themselves were interested in learning they'd have something to teach the children? Surely it can't take more than half an hour in a library (schools still have those don't they?) to learn for yourself the basics of any religion from the Encyclopaedia Britannica and thus avoid having to rely on state-sponsored cr@p.
One thing that really irritated me at school was the teacher who obviously didn't care very much for knowledge him/herself. How are they supposed to get kids interested. These invariably tended to be the types that wore jeans to work and thought ties were for other people. The older generation of teachers (fast retiring when I left) knew stuff and could dress themselves and generaly got more respect than the "just call me Pete" brigade.
 
#15
Calypso said:
RTFQ said:
Princess Diana (Queen of Loveliness) didn't like the birqua because it stopped people seeing her pretty toes)
They could have bent over a long way...unless the 'Princess of all Our Hearts' had toes growing out of her head...which would certainly explain a few things.

Anyway, I agree - this sort of nannying really pi$$es me off as well. If I want to label all Jews as moaning gits, and all Muslims as towel headed bomb-happy lunatics, then I bloody well shall.

Just not in Army time **ahem ahem**
I'm sure they speak highly of you too :lol: :lol:
 
#16
You can whinge as much as you like about the gash that's taught, but if the political leadership is in favour of a particular slant on cultural propaganda, then that's what you're going to get. Vote into power the people whose opinions you believe in and you'll be a happy budgie.

Vote for New Labour and you'll get PC. Vote for PSF and you'll get Martin McGuinness as Minister of Education.

Democracy's brilliant, eh?
 
#17
My mum has been teaching in secondary schools for the last fifteen years. She is sick of two things. Firstly she is sick of people assuming that it's the teachers who initiate (or even have influence over) the liberal minded syllabus making. And she is sick of the chronic underinvestment in the bits of education that actually matter. I guess she is one of the 'older' generation that Bladensburg refers to above.

According to 0A, the country needs to make two simple changes to stop the rot. (1) Pay teachers the sort of salary that you would hope would attract a decent intelligent and committed person to teach your children. I am told that currently teachers' salaries are comparable to McDonalds branch managers. QED. Pay the teachers more - the theory goes - and you are then able to compete with the private sector for more qood quality people. (2) Recognise that a child's education is a long-term issue. Most children are in full-time education for 11-14 years. The programme of education over this period should therefore logically be stable and consistent, and not susceptible to flux and political vagaries.

Resolving Point (1) is easy. How you achieve Point (2) is more difficult, but if you compare the maximum period of government of 5 years with the duration of a child's education (11-14 years), it soon becomes obvious that government meddling with education is the single biggest negative influence on a child's education. If management of education were handed over to an independent Quango, and managed along a similar structure to the way that market regulation of former state managed industries are managed by Ofcom, Oftel etc, then the direct management of the education system would be removed from the w@nkers in Whitehall.

Comments please!
 
#18
Before anyone asks - I'm not a raving Tory. But I suspect I might vote for them this time out of sheer desperation.
 
#19
On the original topic I still think it should be up to the teacher to find out and then explain to the brats the reasons behind religious tradition. If you can't describe the symbolism behind holy communion re wine/blood and bread/body what is the point of teaching them anything about Christianity? The same goes for the Sikh's five Ks, you need to explain the historic and religious symbolism otherwise the children cannot be expected to understand Sikhs as a people.
The aim seems to be to avoid encouraging the pupils to think about what they're learning by feeding them the most useless minimum of bland facts possible.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#20
OldRedCap said:
From today D/Telegraph
Holy Ghost too spooky for children, teachers told
By David Sapsted
(Filed: 11/04/2005)

......

The guidelines, drawn up by education chiefs in Norfolk and condemned by the National Union of Teachers yesterday as "modernism gone mad", also consign the term Old Testament to the dustbin because pupils may believe it means its contents are no longer relevant.

......
Nurse! Sick bucket please.
I think it can be explained by the words in bold......
 

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