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Holocaust Memorial Day 27th January

#1
Well, I was just flicking through the channels on TV and noticed that BBC 4 was showing a "film drama" entitled "Primo" to commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day. So I Googled it and found this:

http://www.hmd.org.uk/about/

What is Holocaust Memorial Day?
The Holocaust

Nazi Germany murdered six million Jews in a systematic, state-sponsored campaign of persecution and extermination now known as the Holocaust. It persecuted, incarcerated and murdered millions of its own citizens, and those of the countries it invaded, on the basis of skin colour; disability; sexual orientation; ethnicity; religious belief or political affiliation.

In 1933, when the Nazis came to power in Germany, the Jewish population of Europe stood over nine million. The Nazi campaign to exclude and persecute Jews, and others, as “life unworthy of life” began. By war’s end, close to two out of every three Jews in Europe had been murdered in the Holocaust.

During the war years (1939-45), the Nazis created ghettos to isolate Jews and established concentration camps to imprison all people targeted on ethnic, racial or political grounds. Between 1942 and 1944 Nazi Germany deported millions of people from the territories it occupied to extermination camps to be murdered in gas chambers. At the largest killing centre, Auschwitz-Birkenau, transports of Jews arrived almost daily from across Europe.

Although Jews were the primary victims of Nazi racism, others targeted for death included tens of thousands of Roma (Gypsies) and at least 200,000 mentally or physically disabled people (source:www.ushmm.org). As Nazi tyranny spread across Europe, millions of people were persecuted and murdered. More than three million Soviet prisoners of war were murdered or died of starvation, disease or maltreatment. The Nazis killed tens of thousands of Polish intellectual and religious leaders; deported millions of Polish and persecuted and incarcerated homosexuals.

Millions of lives were lost, or changed, often beyond redemption. The consequences of this loss and persecution are felt today by Holocaust and genocide survivors, their children and grand-children, in the UK and around the world.

Holocaust Memorial Day

Holocaust Memorial Day (HMD) is commemorated on 27th January each year. This marks the anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau.

HMD aims to commemorate, to educate and to prompt action in the UK. HMD commemorates the lives of those lost in the Holocaust; as a result of Nazi persecution and in more recent genocides. It educates about the Holocaust and it lessons for the present day. It prompts action in the UK highlighting the continuing dangers of racism, anti-semitism and all forms of discrimination.

The tragedies of Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur show that the international community, and each of us as citizens, has not truly understood the lessons of the Holocaust.

Ultimately the aim of HMD is to motivate people individually and collectively, to ensure that the horrendous crimes, racism and victimisation committed during the Holocaust and more recent genocides are neither forgotten nor repeated, whether in Europe or elsewhere in the world.

HMD is distinct from Yom HaShoah, the Jewish day of remembrance for the Jewish victims of the Nazis, that falls in late April.

Holocaust Memorial Day events

Hundreds of events and activities are held to mark Holocaust Memorial Day in local communities and schools across the UK. A different part of the UK hosts the national commemoration of HMD each year, so far it has been held in London (2001 & 2005); Manchester (2002); Edinburgh (2003); Belfast (2004); Cardiff (2006) and Newcastle (2007). Liverpool will be hosting the national event in 2008.

Every year, a different theme is announced for HMD. In 2008, the theme is Imagine…remember reflect react. Previous years’ themes are available at http://www.hmd.org.uk/resources/cat/12/.

Why Holocaust Memorial Day is relevant to each of us today

The Holocaust was a defining event of the twentieth century and is part of both our history and our contemporary life.

History

*Refugees fled here from Nazi persecution.

*Britain was engaged in a war to defeat Nazi occupation and oppression.

*UK soldiers liberated Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.

*Survivors and refugees who rebuilt their lives here have made major contributions to present day UK society.

*Britain played a lead role in developing the international conventions protecting universal human rights after WW2.

Contemporary life

Nazi ideology was founded on racism, anti-semitism and discrimination, creating a fascist state that rejected human and civil rights. The evils of prejudice, discrimination and intolerance continue to exist in Britain. We have lessons to apply today, as individuals, communities and institutions within our society. Hate crimes and attacks against people because of race or ethnicity; sexuality; disability; or religion continue to take place. HMD acts as a reminder to all of us of our responsibility to protect the civil and human rights of all people in our society and around the world.

Holocaust Memorial Day around the world

In May 1998, the Swedish, UK and US Governments established the Task Force for International Co-operation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research. (www.holocausttaskforce.org) They were subsequently joined by Germany, Israel, Poland, the Netherlands, France and Italy, and there are now 25 member countries.

In 2000, Prime Minister, Tony Blair announced the establishment of Holocaust Memorial Day and it was decided that the inaugural commemoration would be in 2001.

At the same time in January 2000, forty four governments from around the world sent delegations to Stockholm, Sweden to attend the Stockholm International Forum on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research. At the end of the conference, the heads of delegation unanimously signed The Stockholm Declaration. These principles are enshrined in the HMD Statement of Commitment

In October 2005, the United Nations designated 27 January as International Holocaust Memorial Day.

Your invitation

Please join in an event to commemorate HMD, or create one of your own. Events are held all over the country and are open to all. These range from civic ceremonies to theatre performances. Anyone can organise an activity to commemorate HMD. Individual symbolic acts, like lighting a candle or observing a silence also signify your commitment to remember the past and create a better future. Our website contains guidance on how you can become involved in commemorating HMD.
It's the first time I've ever heard of this annual commemoration. I'm wondering if others are as ill-informed as I, obviously, am?
 
#2
Well I can say I wasn't up on this event- and suprisingly enough I didn't see or hear anything of the forthcoming HMD when I visited Auschwitz-Birkenau last Saturday.
 
#5
duffdike said:
I think it is time these guys moved on. No really. It is.

Why?
Do you think we should give up Remembrance Sunday too?
"Lest we forget" is equally important for victims of the Holocaust as it is for anyone else.Having visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and Belsen I think it is imperative that we don't forget it.
 
#6
I do not know what *Having visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and Belsen I think it is imperative that we don't forget it.* means. Why should we not now forget it and move on? And plenty of people apart from you have visited those venues.
 
#7
On the 24th Jan 1994, we were in the gas chamber at Rheindahlen. As the instructor lit yet more CS pellets the guy next to me said "Do you know what day it is?". "No" says I.

"Well, its the 40th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz" says he. Suddenly life seemed much better and all of us felt just a little bit guilty because we knew we were going to survive.
 
#8
DD

I take your point.

I joined up with a British tour and when we went into the gas chamber I was the ONLY person to remove my hat.

FFS people were destroyed in that room and no one seemed moved by it. The people were just indifferent and that makes me think that despite the horror of what was done perhaps it is time to let go.

Camp 1 is the barracks,

The film industry has created scenes that make the camp look like a film set.

Sanitising the camp by painting and repairing and providing low key displays gives it an almost "theme park" feel.
(Of the displays all I found moving were the photos of people that displayed date of arrival and date of death.)

Camp 2 - Birkenau is however stark and chilling and it gives a very different view.

But I do have a burning memory from 1981 that makes me say
No keep the past alive and
"Remember what was done in these places"
 
#9
duffdike said:
I do not know what *Having visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and Belsen I think it is imperative that we don't forget it.* means. Why should we not now forget it and move on? And plenty of people apart from you have visited those venues.
The point is that prior to my visit I'd only seen old black and white pictures that really don't convey the horror of what was happening. Having visited and seen things like the piles of human hair , the room full of spectacles and the conditions these people lived and died in I gained a clearer picture of what the term Death Camp meant. We should never ever forget it I know I won't.
 
#11
craftsmanx said:
duffdike said:
I do not know what *Having visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and Belsen I think it is imperative that we don't forget it.* means. Why should we not now forget it and move on? And plenty of people apart from you have visited those venues.
The point is that prior to my visit I'd only seen old black and white pictures that really don't convey the horror of what was happening. Having visited and seen things like the piles of human hair , the room full of spectacles and the conditions these people lived and died in I gained a clearer picture of what the term Death Camp meant. We should never ever forget it I know I won't.
Go to the museum underneath the Holocaust memorial in Berlin. If you can keep dry eyes when you read the letters from the individuals who knew they were about to be killed, you are a harder soul than me...

I walked out thinking that everyone should visit...
 
#12
duffdike said:
I think it is time these guys moved on. No really. It is.
Cool Mate. Just let me know when I can come along to beat your family to death, or maybe just starve them until they catch a disease that will kill them and I'll pop along and do it.

Of course I'll be working them as long as they are able, and as soon as they aren't I'll have one of the others kill them. Of course I'll seperate out the grandchildren and elderly first and get your next door neighbour to kill them as they are of no use to me.

I'll be doing all this because I don't like Ex Rodneys who have their heads buried in their own hoop - just my opinion you understand.

Then pop along and tell me how long it will be before you get over it and move on.
 
J

jimuk80

Guest
#15
duffdike said:
I think it is time these guys moved on. No really. It is.
Moved on to what exactly?

The cost of life was around the six million mark. Unarmed, imprisoned and of no threat. The holocaust is the most horrific slaughter of human life to date.

In my opinion you should never move on than that, it should be a constant reminder of how low and destructive we as a species can become.
 
#17
To forgive...possibly, otherwise we'll be condemned to live forever in the past.

To forget....never, more so a visit to these hellish places should be mandatory for every living being irrespective of their nationality, once in their lives.

Will it change anything? The optimist in me says yes, the cynic in me remembers similar attrocities committed in the Balkans after Titos death.

The choice is yours.
 
#18
Trip_Wire said:
duffdike said:
I think it is time these guys moved on. No really. It is.
A pretty insensitive statement duffdike!

Did you ever hear the term "Those Who Forget History Are Doomed to Repeat It"?

I visited the Dachau concentration camp in 1968 and I will never forget what I saw there.

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005214

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Dachau/
And what about ALL the Russians lost MILLIONS MORE, 10's on millions

Did you ever hear the term "Those Who Forget History Are Doomed to Repeat It"?
WE still have not!

I went to Bergen Belsen once, errie but did not stop me from believing that some freedoms are still worth fighting for, if it is YOUR country!

And what about all those murdered by Jewish Terrorists in Palistine, when the west game the land? British soldiers and policemen!
 
#19
Holocaust survivor to give talk

A HOLOCAUST survivor will be in Lincoln to recount her experiences.
Agnes Sassoon is to address an audience at the Friends Meeting House to mark Holocaust Memorial Day which is held on January 27th.

Ms Sassoon from Budapest, Hungary, survived two Nazi concentration camps at the end of the Second World War.
She spent part of her childhood in Czechoslovakia when a group from her nursery school was sent out to welcome Hitler in the Autumn of 1938.

Her father was active in the Hungarian underground movement and her older brother was shot dead by the Nazis.
The talk will be held at the Beaumont Fee building on Wednesday, January 30th, starting at 7:30pm.
Entry is free.


http://www.lincolnshire.gov.uk/eventdetails.asp?catid=14799&eventcode=41395



An education from a survivor and not many survivors left according to sky news reports.
 
#20
The event should be considered important in the UK if only as Britain / Commonwealth lost circa 1/4million men fighting the tyrrany of Nazi Germany / Japan and all it stood for which included the Holocaust. The Kindertransport to the UK prior to '39 saved many lives, etc.

British soldiers were sent to die in KZ camps in some instances. and I suspect that instances such as the liberation of places like Bergan gave those soldiers who liberated the place enough justification for their efforts & losses during WWII.

The event should be remembered if only as a warning for future generations.
 

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