Holding our nerve in Afghanistan

#1
Holding our nerve in Afghanistan
Communities have flourished where foundations of security have been laid. We intend to replicate these successes in 2010

Jim Dutton
guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 29 December 2009 12.00 GMT

With British forces mainly based in Helmand, it is not surprising that most reporting in UK concentrates on that province, and reporting of the recent tragic casualties reflects this. Having returned last month from a year as the deputy commander of the International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) in Kabul, I can give a more Afghanistan-wide perspective.

There has been encouraging development in Afghanistan since the overthrow of the Taliban regime eight years ago. The statistics speak for themselves: in education, enrolled pupil numbers have grown from 1 million in 2001 to about 6.6 million today. More than a third of these are girls, up from virtually none under the Taliban. Access to healthcare has vastly improved across the country, with 82% of the population now living in a district with access to basic healthcare, compared with 9% in 2003.
More
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/dec/29/afghanistan-security-successes-2010?
 
E

EScotia

Guest
#5
So we're losing some excellent soldiers so afghannie girls can learn to read & write :?

Rather keep our guys here and spend the money on those of our nation who can't get easy access to dentists :)
 
#6
EScotia said:
So we're losing some excellent soldiers so afghannie girls can learn to read & write :?

Rather keep our guys here and spend the money on those of our nation who can't get easy access to dentists :)
Quite.....more of an opinion piece than an article. I thought that was what we had politicians for, or have they finally realised nobody believes a word they say?
 
#7
But sending us to Iraq and Afghanistan makes the gobment think it's still some sort of world player on the stage. Guess what! The days of imperial might are long gone!
 
#8
Fallschirmjager said:
Faustic said:
Nice to see an article based around our progress in Afghanistan for once.
Yep, super smashing great! The money that could have been spent on our own country is being spent on a bunch of ragheads instead.
Heh, I suppose. But at least the reporting is positive rather than negative, like they all tend to be nowadays.
 
#9
irlsgt said:
The worst possible thing that could happen Afghanisatan is that in International forces pull out too early/completely.
The only international force i would like to see in afghan would consist of the armed forces of, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and anybody else from that region who for generations have expected us to support them with NO payback.
 
#10
revmodes said:
irlsgt said:
The worst possible thing that could happen Afghanisatan is that in International forces pull out too early/completely.
The only international force i would like to see in afghan would consist of the armed forces of, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and anybody else from that region who for generations have expected us to support them with NO payback.
I'm not too sure about India, but I'd certainly like to see the Saudis there. They started the whole thing in the first place when their fellas banjoed the Twin Towers, and they've an army of something like a million squaddies, plus about five million more militia and such.

MsG
 
#11
What a load of bollox!

There is only 'progress' as long as that progress is paid for in coalition blood. The minute we stop bleeding for the Afghans and come home, it will be back to the future faster than you can grow the next poppy crop.
 
#12
Fallschirmjager said:
But sending us to Iraq and Afghanistan makes the gobment think it's still some sort of world player on the stage. Guess what! The days of imperial might are long gone!

Broon seems to have missed that dit judging by his vainglorious grandstanding with the Chinese this morning…
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#13
Dont forrget the Guardian is the party mouth piece of new Labour and as such is attempting to convince its wavering tofu munchering (probably BBC employees or E&D managers) voters that it was a good thing and anyway its only chavs and upper class twits that choose to get killed for Queen and Country!
CuntsIwouldnt letmychickensshitonthatrag!
 
#14
Faustic said:
Nice to see an article based around our progress in Afghanistan for once.
Don't you think it just a little worrying that this good news regarding progress has been written by a very senior serving officer who has just finished a tour as DCOM ISAF.

Would you expect him to say his efforts over the past 12 months have been a disaster?

When the positive stories from independent sources outweigh the negative stories from independent sources, then - maybe - it would be time to rejoice.
 
#15
Its called human rights!

ISAF is training the ANA & ANP to take over, but the Afghan Government is crupt (show me one that isn't)

The Pakistan couldn't be trusted to stop the Taliban crossing their border and regrouping

A lot of British (and other troops) have died but if they pull out the Taliban will take back over and kill all those who helped ISAF and those who question them. What will they have died for then?
 
#16
Have to say I am slightly confused by Jim Dutton's resume, is he currently serving? If so, why doesn't he use his rank in the article? (or would that scare off Guardian readers?) He describes himself as a senior executive..?? Eh..

Jim Dutton

Lieutenant General at Minsitry of Defence
Afghanistan
Contact Jim Dutton
Add Jim Dutton to your network
Current
Deputy Commander at NATO International Security Assistance Force
Lieutenant General at Ministry of Defence
Past
Deputy Chief at UK Permanent Joint HQ
COS (Capability) at CINC FLEET
Commandant General RM at Royal Marines
Education
Royal College of Defence Studies
Army Staff Cllege Camberley
The City University, London

Jim Dutton’s Summary

An accomplished senior executive, with a proven track record in leading complex organisations under the most intense pressure. I have developed strong diplomatic and relationship-building skills - having now progressed to the top in a highly competitive environment, I am seeking a new career to challenge me and provide the same level of job satisfaction

Jim Dutton’s Experience

Deputy Commander
NATO International Security Assistance Force
(Defense & Space industry)
October 2008 — Present (1 year 3 months)
Directing activity via 19 General and Flag Officers in the HQ
Key interface with the diplomatic community, UN mission, Afghan Government Ministries and NGOs
Diplomatic sensitivity required in dealing with the national issues of 42 countries
Constant contact with the MOD on military issues
Working closely with the British Ambassador in dealing with Whitehall on political and diplomatic issues
Highly experienced in press and TV interviews
A role requiring a strong operational military background with sound political awareness

Recent previous roles.........it continues
 
#17
whitecity said:
Faustic said:
Nice to see an article based around our progress in Afghanistan for once.
Don't you think it just a little worrying that this good news regarding progress has been written by a very senior serving officer who has just finished a tour as DCOM ISAF.
Perhaps the fact that he was Deputy Commander ISAF might actually lend to his authority and insight on the subject?

whitecity said:
Would you expect him to say his efforts over the past 12 months have been a disaster?
If they had been, then yes I would. High ranking officers such as Generals Dannatt, Richards and indeed Hutton himself, have been completely candid in the past about the progress, or lack of, in Afghanistan.

whitecity said:
When the positive stories from independent sources outweigh the negative stories from independent sources, then - maybe - it would be time to rejoice.
whitecity I get the sneaky feeling that if William Blake himself descended from heaven and told you that he'd seen angels over Helmand Province, you'd dismiss him as a tainted source.
 
#18
ugly said:
Dont forrget the Guardian is the party mouth piece of new Labour and as such is attempting to convince its wavering tofu munchering (probably BBC employees or E&D managers) voters that it was a good thing and anyway its only chavs and upper class twits that choose to get killed for Queen and Country!
CuntsIwouldnt letmychickensshitonthatrag!
No it's not. The Guardian, like most heavy weight papers, features articles and commentary from sources across the political and social spectrum. In this case they published an article on the progress in Afghanistan by a British general who was recently deputy commander of ISAF. Who would you have preferred?
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#19
This is ARRSE - we shouldn't really be commenting on Gen Dutton, as he is a Bootie (as are many senior commanders these days).

His predecessor in the post had a rather different view, that's for sure!
 
#20
OldSnowy said:
This is ARRSE - we shouldn't really be commenting on Gen Dutton, as he is a Bootie (as are many senior commanders these days).

His predecessor in the post had a rather different view, that's for sure!
Sorry, just wondering, if it was Jim, James, General Jim, Gen Dutton, Chief Executive Dutton, Mr Dutton............he had a picture of himself in uniform for his article, but he goes by the name of Jim. Anyone help me out here, before Old Snowy throws me out?
 

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