Hold off on the Tar and Feathers

Should the Americans hold off on the tars and feather for the High School Cop?

  • Yes

    Votes: 49 45.4%
  • No

    Votes: 19 17.6%
  • I like Egg Banjos

    Votes: 51 47.2%

  • Total voters
    108
#1
I have been thinking about the terrible school shooting in Florida and the so called cowardice of the cop who waited for support rather than charging in, armed, I assume with a Webley and a swagger stick, to arrest a murderous nutter with an assault weapon.

I know that in the same situation, I'd hope to be armed with an assault weapon that was significantly better than that of the murderous nutter, and covered head to toe in Kevlar and surrounded by at least a dozen mates similarly attired and equipped.

Officer’s Hesitation To Stop Shooting Fits A Pattern Of Police Cowardice

It'll be interesting when the facts of this incident come out, but using it as an excuse to arm Sister Mary Bridget, the Catholic Primary School Principal seems a tad precipitous as does ruining the life of a copper, who at 55, had probably taken the job of a school security guard, for a quiet life.
 
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#3
A police officer is killed in the line of duty every other day in America. Can't blame them for being afraid. How many armchair heroes would have done anything different?

I believe that the policy in Britain is for police to wait for armed support before confronting an armed criminal. That applies to criminals armed with knives as well as guns.
 
#4
The local sheriff has already stated that the reason for the cop being there is to prevent or stop such violence once it starts. He failed to carry out his duty for whatever reason. I am pretty sure if this cop has a soul, he will be going through a constant living hell in his own mind for the rest of his life. No matter what comes out, he will be seen as a pariah so his life is basically over. I will not be surprised to hear he swallowed his shotgun at some point in the future.
 
#5
A police officer is killed in the line of duty every other day in America. Can't blame them for being afraid. How many armchair heroes would have done anything different?

I believe that the policy in Britain is for police to wait for armed support before confronting an armed criminal. That applies to criminals armed with knives as well as guns.
Well said

Even SWAT didn't go steaming in without being mob handed.
He won't be the first to have froze when the gunfire starts
 
#6
The local sheriff has already stated that the reason for the cop being there is to prevent or stop such violence once it starts. He failed to carry out his duty for whatever reason. I am pretty sure if this cop has a soul, he will be going through a constant living hell in his own mind for the rest of his life. No matter what comes out, he will be seen as a pariah so his life is basically over. I will not be surprised to hear he swallowed his shotgun at some point in the future.
Is the Sheriff in America an elected politician rather than a professional police officer?
 
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jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#7
I could just imagine the first kid he shot, he’d be hung out to dry.
Wouldn’t be oops he did his best against overwhelming odds. Death row.
 
#8
Is the Sherriff in America an elected politician rather than a professional police officer?
For the majority, an elected official. Depending on the county, town etc, most require those who run for the position to be a law enforcement officer these days, otherwise they can’t wear a police uniform.
 
#12
I retired from US Law Enforcement two years ago after 25 years (State Police). Each situation is different, sometimes you wait for back up to arrive, other times you don't/can't and hope it isn't far behind, it all depends on the situation.

In this case I'd have gone in. The chap in question was the School Resources Officer, he was responsible for providing security and crime prevention services in the school. I spoke earlier today with my brother in law who is still a serving Police Officer, the county he works for has a 6 month rotation system for school resources officer that they all have to do.

His opinion is that it was the job of the Officer in question to have gone in. I'm not going to offer any opinion of this chaps actions as I don't know all the facts and I'm taking what the Media say or write with a pinch of salt.

Rather I'll wait to see what the outcome of any proceedings are first and even then I'll probably keep my thoughts to myself.
 
#13
Hey guys I retired last year after a little over 20 from NYPD.......my 2 cents (or pence)

On 9/11 I will admit I was scared but I had a job to do, I didn't want to be going into the Towers and my brain was telling me NOT to go in but I put on a uniform everyday and was paid by the people in those Towers, I went in.
(Lucked out by NOT being in either when they came down)

Courage is not being unafraid it's being afraid and still doing what needs to be done.
(I don’t think I did anything particularly courageous, I just did my job)
On another note I was called to the scene of, multiple calls, a person with an Uzi holding a woman hostage in an apartment in Brooklyn.
I was the Sergeant on the scene, I only had a 9mm pistol and another Sergeant with me ran out so fast he left his gun at the Precinct, I gave him by 5-shot .38 revolverI had as a back-up gun.
We then BOTH went in because that's our job !
 

49er

On ROPS
On ROPs
#14
Hey guys I retired last year after a little over 20 from NYPD.......my 2 cents (or pence)

On 9/11 I will admit I was scared but I had a job to do, I didn't want to be going into the Towers and my brain was telling me NOT to go in but I put on a uniform everyday and was paid by the people in those Towers, I went in.
(Lucked out by NOT being in either when they came down)

Courage is not being unafraid it's being afraid and still doing what needs to be done.
(I don’t think I did anything particularly courageous, I just did my job)
On another note I was called to the scene of, multiple calls, a person with an Uzi holding a woman hostage in an apartment in Brooklyn.
I was the Sergeant on the scene, I only had a 9mm pistol and another Sergeant with me ran out so fast he left his gun at the Precinct, I gave him by 5-shot .38 revolverI had as a back-up gun.
We then BOTH went in because that's our job !
And the outcome was?
 
#15
Lol .......I’m still here and so is he !

He saw us and dropped the “Uzi” (realistic looking pellet gun !)

Needed a drink though afterward !
 
#17
Lol .......I’m still here and so is he !

He saw us and dropped the “Uzi” (realistic looking pellet gun !)

Needed a drink though afterward !
Hope you don't mind but, How often did you have to qualify to carry your personal weapon? How much range time and who supplied the ammo?
Watching TV all these years all the cops are dead shots but you never see the buggers in a range.
Wondering about the reality.
 
#18
I only had a 9mm pistol and another Sergeant with me ran out so fast he left his gun at the Precinct,
9mm pistol! I thought you lads of The NYPD were still using the old S&W Model 10 ;)
 
#19
9mm pistol! I thought you lads of The NYPD were still using the old S&W Model 10 ;)
Lol ! We were transitioning when I got on, shot a revolver in the Academy. Working plainclothes I only carried my .38 snub nose.

The NYPD actually finally de-authorized revolvers in January of this year.
 
#20
Hope you don't mind but, How often did you have to qualify to carry your personal weapon? How much range time and who supplied the ammo?
Watching TV all these years all the cops are dead shots but you never see the buggers in a range.
Wondering about the reality.
Twice a year, shoot about two boxes (100 rounds) of ammo. Not conducive to being crack shots......it’s CYA training. Also the twelve pound NYPD trigger pull is horrible (a standard Glock has about a five and a half pound pull)
 

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