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HMS Hermes / INS Viraat to be scrapped

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
It appears that HMS Hermes is about to be scrapped as it has been a failure as a museum ship.

Hermes is the oldest surviving aircraft carrier having been commissioned in 1959 and served with the RN until 1984 before being transferred to india. After sitting idle for 3 years she has been sold for scrap to a shipyard.

Article in the Daily Wail, but also on a couple of other news site.

1598389058930.png


A sad end to a fine ship.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Apart from the USS Yorktown, commissioned in 1943. Yorktown was decommissioned in 1970 and in 1975 became a museum ship at Patriots Point, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, where she was designated a National Historic Landmark.

Except that Yorktown hasn't been operational since 1986

1975–present
Yorktown was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1986.[4]

Through most of the 1990s, Yorktown housed WSCI-FM, 89.3, a local public radio station, part of the South Carolina Educational Radio Network. WSCI's offices and library were inside, while its broadcast booth was in the ship's "pri-fly", primary flight control, the control tower of an aircraft carrier, overlooking the water facing the Charleston peninsula. South Carolina Educational Radio shut down WSCI's local broadcasting in 1998.
 
Except that Yorktown hasn't been operational since 1986

1975–present
Yorktown was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1986.[4]

Through most of the 1990s, Yorktown housed WSCI-FM, 89.3, a local public radio station, part of the South Carolina Educational Radio Network. WSCI's offices and library were inside, while its broadcast booth was in the ship's "pri-fly", primary flight control, the control tower of an aircraft carrier, overlooking the water facing the Charleston peninsula. South Carolina Educational Radio shut down WSCI's local broadcasting in 1998.

Which has no relevance to being the 'oldest surviving CV'.
 

philc

LE
The Happy H, me Early 81 till Late 82, big thing to chip and paint.
 

AfricaExpat

Old-Salt
Big ships even docked cost a fortune to run and I can't believe there is any way a museum ship could generate sufficient profit. Worst possible scenario would be something like USS Texas which has almost become a wreck through lack of funds.
 
It appears that HMS Hermes is about to be scrapped as it has been a failure as a museum ship.

Hermes is the oldest surviving aircraft carrier having been commissioned in 1959 and served with the RN until 1984 before being transferred to india. After sitting idle for 3 years she has been sold for scrap to a shipyard.

Article in the Daily Wail, but also on a couple of other news site.

View attachment 499734

A sad end to a fine ship.
Ahem... all these still afloat as Museum ships
USS Intrepid (CV11) commissioned 16 August 1943
USS Yorktown (CV10) commissioned 15 April 1943
USS Hornet (CV12) commissioned 29 November 1943
USS Lexington (CV16) commissioned 23 September 1943
 

Londo

On ROPS
On ROPs
A sad end to a ship with a fair bit of history .
But this being India could they not turn her into a public toilet ? After all plenty of deck space and every few days they could hose down the flight deck ( could be known as the poop deck ) and start again .
 
I think all three of RBMK, Skipped Once and Goldbricker are correct.

In essence - Hermes/Viraat is the oldest-surviving British aircraft carrier. The British gets deleted in many references, which starts the possible confusion. This is compounded by the discussion of whether the 'oldest carrier' means still extant, even if the ship last sailed decades ago; theoretically capable of use as a carrier if refurbished/refitted or actually in service as a carrier.

The reason for this is that some authorities appear to consider museum ships to be a role conversion - so although Intrepid (say) was an aircraft carrier and looks like an aircraft carrier, it isn't. There are further definitions - for example, could tugs move the ship from its current location, with a crew steering the ship? If not, it's definitely a floating museum and no longer a carrier (or a frigate, or whatever the ship entered service as). Other authorities consider this overly-fussy/pedantic and consider Yorktown (say) to be an aircraft carrier, even if the ship is now a museum. I have to say that I tend to sympathise with this latter definition, otherwise you end up having to decide whether to describe HMS Victory as a museum, a 104-gun first rate ship of the line or a command ship (as Victory is the flagship for 1SL).

For our purposes though, under one definition, RBMK is correct, under another Skipped Once and Goldbricker are right.

We hope you enjoyed tonight's pedants' corner and return you to your scheduled discussion with a reminder that when Hermes was transferred to the Indian Navy, the newly-named Viraat was commissioned/launched by the Indians by the ceremonial breaking of a Bounty Bar across the forward hawser...
 

Yokel

LE
I think all three of RBMK, Skipped Once and Goldbricker are correct.

In essence - Hermes/Viraat is the oldest-surviving British aircraft carrier. The British gets deleted in many references, which starts the possible confusion. This is compounded by the discussion of whether the 'oldest carrier' means still extant, even if the ship last sailed decades ago; theoretically capable of use as a carrier if refurbished/refitted or actually in service as a carrier.

The reason for this is that some authorities appear to consider museum ships to be a role conversion - so although Intrepid (say) was an aircraft carrier and looks like an aircraft carrier, it isn't. There are further definitions - for example, could tugs move the ship from its current location, with a crew steering the ship? If not, it's definitely a floating museum and no longer a carrier (or a frigate, or whatever the ship entered service as). Other authorities consider this overly-fussy/pedantic and consider Yorktown (say) to be an aircraft carrier, even if the ship is now a museum. I have to say that I tend to sympathise with this latter definition, otherwise you end up having to decide whether to describe HMS Victory as a museum, a 104-gun first rate ship of the line or a command ship (as Victory is the flagship for 1SL).

For our purposes though, under one definition, RBMK is correct, under another Skipped Once and Goldbricker are right.

We hope you enjoyed tonight's pedants' corner and return you to your scheduled discussion with a reminder that when Hermes was transferred to the Indian Navy, the newly-named Viraat was commissioned/launched by the Indians by the ceremonial breaking of a Bounty Bar across the forward hawser...

Hmmm Bounty. I hope nobody had any ideas about holding a mutiny...

Was the Bounty chosen because it contained coconut and was culturally appropriate? If a quiet stealthy ship such as an ASW frigate or a submarine was being transferred would they have used a Wispa?

They could have used some indian alcohol. I suppose these days a can of Red Bull would be offered (gives you wings).
 
I think all three of RBMK, Skipped Once and Goldbricker are correct.

In essence - Hermes/Viraat is the oldest-surviving British aircraft carrier. The British gets deleted in many references, which starts the possible confusion. This is compounded by the discussion of whether the 'oldest carrier' means extant, even if the ship last sailed decades ago; theoretically capable of use as a carrier if refurbished/refitted or actually in service as a carrier.

The reason for this is that some authorities appear to consider museum ships to be a role conversion - so although Intrepid (say) was an aircraft carrier and looks like an aircraft carrier, it isn't. There are further definitions - for example, could tugs move the ship from its current location, with a crew steering the ship? If not, it's definitely a floating museum and no longer a carrier (or a frigate, or whatever the ship entered service as). Other authorities consider this overly-fussy/pedantic and consider Yorktown (say) to be an aircraft carrier, even if the ship is now a museum. I have to say that I tend to sympathise with this latter definition, otherwise you end up having to decide whether to describe HMS Victory as a museum, a 104-gun first rate ship of the line or a command ship (as Victory is the flagship for 1SL).

For our purposes though, under one definition, RBMK is correct, under another Skipped Once and Goldbricker are right.

We hope you enjoyed tonight's pedants' corner and return you to your scheduled discussion with a reminder that when Hermes was transferred to the Indian Navy, the newly-named Viraat was commissioned/launched by the Indians by the ceremonial breaking of a Bounty Bar across the forward hawser...

No charge.
 
Big ships even docked cost a fortune to run and I can't believe there is any way a museum ship could generate sufficient profit. Worst possible scenario would be something like USS Texas which has almost become a wreck through lack of funds.

See Goldbricker's post re museum ships.

I've been on the Intrepid, a fantastic afternoon out and it was certainly very busy when I was there. In good nick for an old bird too.
 

Bluenose2

Old-Salt
See Goldbricker's post re museum ships.

I've been on the Intrepid, a fantastic afternoon out and it was certainly very busy when I was there. In good nick for an old bird too.

Me too - on our honeymoon. It coincided with Halloween and the ship's 'crew' put on a brilliant afternoon - jumping out of doorways and running screaming up darkened passageways etc.

The sound/light show in the hanger deck was also pretty good, especially the moment where you realise you're standing on the spot where the narrator (or should I say the real person being played by a voice actor) died in an air raid.
 
Me too - on our honeymoon. It coincided with Halloween and the ship's 'crew' put on a brilliant afternoon - jumping out of doorways and running screaming up darkened passageways etc.

The sound/light show in the hanger deck was also pretty good, especially the moment where you realise you're standing on the spot where the narrator (or should I say the real person being played by a voice actor) died in an air raid.

It was my honeymoon I was there for as well, I got lucky and it was during fleet week, some absolutely outstanding displays, including several formation flypasts. FYI those San Antonio class are fecking huge!
 

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