HMS Chatham foils pirates

#1
With patience, guile and no drama.

"Royal Navy warship HMS Chatham has intercepted a hijacked dhow, being used as a pirate mother ship, to the east of the Gulf of Aden and set free its kidnapped crew."

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#2
Good!
 
#7
Jarr at 6ft 10 in her boots she was extremely scary ha ha

Her bloke was 5ft 5, her daughter 6ft 2 and 20 stone.

The one in the middle was ok though :wink: :wink:
 

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#8
Good effort!

I tend never to knock or have a go at the Royal Navy.

Why?

Mainly because we live on an island, and also because my three years afloat in HMS ALBION and HMS HERMES, were bloody marvellous! No, I'll re-phrase that, those years were: 'brill', 'fant', 'triff', 'fab', 'epic' - 'effing marvellous!!!
 
#10
BiscuitsAB said:
VanHelsing said:
Jarr at 6ft 10 in her boots she was extremely scary ha ha

Her bloke was 5ft 5, her daughter 6ft 2 and 20 stone.

The one in the middle was ok though :wink: :wink:

Er oi like the look O that tall one. Married is she?
Nay she just ad a ickle blokie in tow.

VH
 
#12
Yokel said:
Any chance of this topic being treated seriously?
Yoke, what do you think?
Picture, three scantily clan maidens .... hmmmmmm

So with the drug bust in 2008, it would seem that HMS Chatham, her ship's company and captain are "thrusters"? (Isn't that the naval term?)
 
#13
Well done the Navy for getting the boat back...

But wtf was going on here?

Stricken and overwhelmed by the Royal Navy warship, which closed to the point of bringing the mother ship alongside, the pirates were directed to leave the Vishvakalayan under the shadow of HMS Chatham's close range weapons and Royal Marines marksmen.

They then fled back to the Somali coast in a smaller skiff.
Why didnt they do an 'unload' on the twats as they ran away? They'll be back out raiding ships the next day ffs.
 
#14
snapper said:
Well done the Navy for getting the boat back...

But wtf was going on here?

Stricken and overwhelmed by the Royal Navy warship, which closed to the point of bringing the mother ship alongside, the pirates were directed to leave the Vishvakalayan under the shadow of HMS Chatham's close range weapons and Royal Marines marksmen.

They then fled back to the Somali coast in a smaller skiff.
Why didnt they do an 'unload' on the twats as they ran away? They'll be back out raiding ships the next day ffs.
Theres a thing called ROE. Much the same way the army isnt supposed to slot taliban after they have dropped weapons and got in a taxi to take them home.
 
#15
danny842003 said:
snapper said:
Well done the Navy for getting the boat back...

But wtf was going on here?

Stricken and overwhelmed by the Royal Navy warship, which closed to the point of bringing the mother ship alongside, the pirates were directed to leave the Vishvakalayan under the shadow of HMS Chatham's close range weapons and Royal Marines marksmen.

They then fled back to the Somali coast in a smaller skiff.
Why didnt they do an 'unload' on the twats as they ran away? They'll be back out raiding ships the next day ffs.
Theres a thing called ROE. Much the same way the army isnt supposed to slot taliban after they have dropped weapons and got in a taxi to take them home.
"Under the shadow of close range weapons and RM marksmen" .....could they not have been detained, arrested, or something? Piracy is still an offence surely. Should have slotted them anyway.
 
#16
Great result from the RN.

Understand the whole ROE business (ie not shooting them once they have surrendered). But where is the deterrent in just letting them go back to the mainland? and giving them a boat to do it in!

Its a bit like some Goons taking a bus load of people hostage, then when we foil their plans we let them go and give them money for a cab home........

Odds on that we find them back at it next week?
 
#17
Azrael2006 said:
Great result from the RN.

Understand the whole ROE business (ie not shooting them once they have surrendered). But where is the deterrent in just letting them go back to the mainland? and giving them a boat to do it in!

Its a bit like some Goons taking a bus load of people hostage, then when we foil their plans we let them go and give them money for a cab home........

Odds on that we find them back at it next week?
It depends on the RN's mandate which appears to have been satisfied on this occasion although the perpetrators escaped after being foiled in their crime. I imagine the CO and ship's company of HMS Chatham and other warships involved in Operation ATALANTA feel just as frustrated as you and me but, unlike all the bloodthirsty armchair warriors, they are bound by the requirement to use 'reasonable force' and the other legal complexities involved:

House of Lords European Union Committee - Twelfth Report - Combating Somali Piracy: the EU's Naval Operation Atalanta
Hansard 14 Apr 2010 said:
Rules of engagement: detention and prosecution of suspected pirates

34. Atalanta military personnel can arrest, detain and transfer persons who are suspected of having committed or who have committed acts of piracy or armed robbery in the areas where they are present. They can seize the vessels of the pirates or vessels captured following an act of piracy or an armed robbery and which are in the hands of the pirates, as well as the goods on board. The suspects can be prosecuted by an EU Member State or by Kenya under an agreement signed with the EU on 6 March 2009 giving the Kenyan authorities the right to prosecute. An exchange of letters concluded on 30 October 2009 between the EU and the Republic of Seychelles allows the transfer of suspected pirates and armed robbers apprehended by Atalanta in the operation area. This arrangement constitutes an important new contribution to the counter-piracy efforts[8]. On 22 March 2010 the Council of the EU authorised High Representative Baroness Ashton of Upholland to open negotiations with Mauritius, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda with a view to concluding further transfer agreements[9].

35. Commander Clive Dow RN told us that Atalanta was a law enforcement operation rather than a war against pirates or an armed conflict. It abided by the law of the sea, under customary international law, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Convention. The principle of "reasonable force" applied[10]. Lethal force could only be employed where there was a threat to life (QQ 112-3). On the rules of engagement, Rear Admiral Hudson assured us that Atalanta had the necessary flexibility to disrupt, deter and arrest pirates (Q 112).

36. Commander Dow said that Atalanta restricted its prosecutions of suspects to pirates who were caught in the act rather than those who looked suspicious on the basis of their equipment. This was due to the arrangements for prosecution, generally in Kenya and the Seychelles. Cases were selected to maximise the chances of conviction, based on witness evidence of an act of piracy. There was a comprehensive approach when it came to prosecutions across the military operations as well as in the political arena. The EU mission worked closely with the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, which was charged with assisting capacity building, not only in Kenya and the Seychelles, but in any other regional area where prosecutions might take place. However it focused its efforts on building capacity in Somalia, Somaliland[11] and Puntland. This ensured that prosecutions were efficiently managed and that human rights standards were met. However, this could not be done "in isolation" for pirates. Capacity building in regional jurisdictions had to apply to the whole system (QQ 113, 148).

37. We asked our witnesses whether human rights standards were being met for the transfer, prosecution and detention of suspected and convicted pirates. Lord Malloch-Brown (then FCO Minister) assured us that Government policy was not to allow transfer to third states of suspected pirates for prosecution unless the Government were satisfied that they would not be subject to cruel treatment, the death penalty or face a trial which was grossly unfair. The UK had signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Kenya in December 2008, and the Government's legal advisers were completely satisfied that suitable guarantees were in place on the sentencing of pirates and their conditions of detention. The EU had since then agreed a similar MoU with Kenya as well as an exchange of letters with the Seychelles authorities for the transfer of suspected pirates (Q 62, p87).

38. Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead said that there were 117 pirates in Kenyan prisons, 75 of whom were transferred by Atalanta for prosecution. A further 11 pirate suspects would be transferred to the Seychelles by Atalanta for prosecution (Q 283; p 83).

39. Speaking of the different organisations operating to counter piracy in the area, Mr Alderwick said that the advantage of the EU was that it had a variety of political instruments; it could enter into political agreements with states in the region, both as a collective entity and through its Member States. By contrast, NATO was seen as a military organisation. The EU has put in place status of forces agreements with states in the region. These acted as a "force multiplier", as Atalanta could operate out of Djibouti and Oman. The EU had also negotiated legal frameworks for the prosecution of pirates, such as that with Kenya. Atalanta had adopted a comprehensive and inter-agency approach, by engaging ship-owners, operators, the British Chamber of Shipping and the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). This approach was key to addressing the piracy issue (QQ 160-1).

40. We welcome the fact that the rules of engagement of Operation Atalanta are sufficiently robust to allow it to carry out its mandate.

41. We welcome the agreements that the EU has signed with Kenya and the Seychelles for the transfer and prosecution of suspected pirates, and the Government's assurance that these agreements safeguard the human rights of those detained. We commend Kenya and the Seychelles for showing leadership in addressing a regional problem, although we are concerned by recent reports that Kenya is considering no longer accepting suspected pirates from international naval forces. The Government and the EU should continue to assist both states in building the capacity of their judicial and penal systems to cope with the increased demand.

42. We also welcome the Council of the EU's agreement to open negotiations on similar arrangements with other countries in the region.
In this case, HMS Chatham secured the safe release of innocent crewmen and their vessel without any bloodshed. I'm sure that any practical suggestions for stopping a highly manoeuvrable fast-moving boat on the high seas, short of opening fire or incurring possible loss of life by other means, would be welcome.
 
#18
I think its a case of international waters not really having very few laws therefore you cant really detain people, as where are you going to try them.
Yeah they should have slotted them. But the government wont back you up when your being court Marshalled for doing it. I mean its only this week to booties got kicked out for beating someone with a boot. So balls to risking my career and prison for killing someone you shouldn't have.
 
#20
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