Hitlers Irishmen

#2
During the Second World War, two young Irishmen served in the armed forces of Nazi Germany, swearing the oath of the Waffen-SS and wearing the organisation's uniform and even its distinctive blood group tattoo.Ironically these young men had originally joined an Irish regiment of the British army, and but for a twist of fate would have ended up fighting against the Germans. Instead, the pair were recruited to the German special forces after they were captured on the island of Jersey.Under the command of Otto Skorzeny, the man who rescued Italian dictator Benito Mussolini from a mountain top prison, they were involved in some of the most ferocious fighting of the war in the last days of the Third Reich.This account, which also covers some of the other Irishmen who sided with Nazi Germany, draws heavily on their own accounts and on state papers which have been released in recent years.
 
#3
dont forget the British FreeCorps, A SS unit made up of Brits mostley from POW camps who had a hatred against the Reds or mixed parentage. Only got around 40 max i think from memory. But they did have a special UK insignia to wear on the SS uniform. 3 Lions on the collar lozange & a Union Flag arm shield badge as well.

As for the Irish, without joining the UK forces, O'Duffy & his blueshirts went of to spain during the civil war to help out Franco & was a avid supporter of Adolf......(not to mention he was mad as a box of frogs).
 
#4
The Germans were more successful recruiting from Indian POWs - there were a number of Indian regiments formed within the Wehrmacht. I think that they were mainly on garrison/fortress or AA units. There were even Sikh batallions, with the turban incorporated into a modified Wehrmacht uniform.
 
#5
Concrete_Marmoset said:
dont forget the British FreeCorps, A SS unit made up of Brits mostley from POW camps who had a hatred against the Reds or mixed parentage. Only got around 40 max i think from memory. But they did have a special UK insignia to wear on the SS uniform. 3 Lions on the collar lozange & a Union Flag arm shield badge as well.

As for the Irish, without joining the UK forces, O'Duffy & his blueshirts went of to spain during the civil war to help out Franco & was a avid supporter of Adolf......(not to mention he was mad as a box of frogs).
I think it was about company strength and was called the Company of St George or somesuch.
 
#7
Xerxes_Blue_Cat said:
Concrete_Marmoset said:
dont forget the British FreeCorps, A SS unit made up of Brits mostley from POW camps who had a hatred against the Reds or mixed parentage. Only got around 40 max i think from memory. But they did have a special UK insignia to wear on the SS uniform. 3 Lions on the collar lozange & a Union Flag arm shield badge as well.

As for the Irish, without joining the UK forces, O'Duffy & his blueshirts went of to spain during the civil war to help out Franco & was a avid supporter of Adolf......(not to mention he was mad as a box of frogs).
I think it was about company strength and was called the Company of St George or somesuch.
The British Free Corps. Didn't even reach platoon strength; every time it got close someone started trouble and got a few to resign. A few of the insiders only joined to sabotage the whole effort.

Renegades
 
#8
Didn't have any luck with Amazon after all, I got a copy from Waterstones.
 
#9
I must say that I don't disapprove of the Waffen-SS punishment for a recruit caught thieving from his mates during basic training - a good kicking from his entire company, followed by a posting to a suicide squad on the Russian Front.
 

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#10
HarryPalmer said:
I must say that I don't disapprove of the Waffen-SS punishment for a recruit caught thieving from his mates during basic training - a good kicking from his entire company, followed by a posting to a suicide squad on the Russian Front.
Lucky that I was never caught...
 
#11
Ach away with the lot of ye!!!

Begorrah!!! yes know nothing!!!!

Donald Sutherland (Liam/IRA) was the best guy the jerries had!!!

And jenny Aggutter (sp) was HOT!!!
 
#12
HarryPalmer said:
I must say that I don't disapprove of the Waffen-SS punishment for a recruit caught thieving from his mates during basic training - a good kicking from his entire company, followed by a posting to a suicide squad on the Russian Front.
Can´t see anything wrong with it myself. What if it had been YOUR respirator, helmet or ammo whilst in Afghan?

Fcuking theives, hate ém. Esp that (civvie) twunt who stole my radio (and smashed up my dash to get it) from my car. That guy would dream of having a company kicking and a postng to a suicide unit.

Ref the British Free Corps. Most of their wartime actions included copious quantities of beer and the local frauleins.

At least one of their member was involved in passing info back to teh UK.
 
#13
James Brady was one of two Irishmen known to have served in the Waffen-SS during World War II.

Brady originally volunteered for the Royal Irish Fusiliers, an Irish Regiment in the British Army, in late 1938. After basic training in Hampshire, he was posted to the Channel Islands in May 1939. In that month he and another man, Frank Stringer, were imprisoned after attacking and injuring a local policeman, and were captured by the Germans when they invaded in June 1940.

The Germans transferred the pair to a POW camp, but soon transferred them to the special Abwehr facility at Friesack Camp in an attempt to recruit them as saboteurs. Stringer proved willing to co-operate, and in September 1941 he and John Codd were transferred to Berlin to begin explosives training at the Abwehr training camp at Quentzgut. That December, Brady and a group of other Irishmen also transferred to Berlin to begin similar training. This latter group, however would seem to have been secretly working on the orders of the Senior British Officer at Friesack to sabotage the German scheme; by September 1942, all the Irishmen involved were imprisoned by the Germans, some in Sachsenhausen concentration camp.

In early 1943, Brady and Stringer were released by the Germans and kept in readiness for Operation Osprey. Subsequently they volunteered for the Waffen-SS and underwent training at Cernay in occupied Alsace-Lorraine. In January 1944, they were recruited to SS-Jäger-Bataillon 502, a special forces unit under the command of Otto Skorzeny.

In late 1944, Brady was involved in Operation Landfried (behind the lines operations in Romania) and in Operation Panzerfaust, the raid on Budapest to prevent Admiral Miklos Horthy from making a separate peace with the Soviets. He also fought at Schwedt on Oder with Skorzeny's ad hoc division in January 1945, and was wounded at the Zehden bridgehead in March. He later fought in the Battle of Berlin.

He surrendered to the British Army in 1946 and was sentenced to fifteen years in prison. He was released in 1950 and returned to Ireland.

Wiki
 
#14
I was intrigued by the three lions on the collar, and can picture these lads heading back to the kaserne after a night on the lash singing "three lions on our shirt, Warsaw is still burning..."
 
#15
I once read Bruce Quarrie's 2 volumes on the SS, Hitler's Samurai IIRC and Hitler's Teutonic Knights. Outstanding books about the recruitment, training and actions they were involved in and a section on the FreiKorps too and where all the different units all ended up at the end of the war.
Apparently popular punishment for dissident trainees was:
To dig a foxhole/scrape in front of an advancing tank afore it minced yer brains.
To stand to attention while a balanced stick grenade exploded atop your helmet (apparently it worked as the explosion went for the easy route ie: away from the helmet!!
However, it says these punishments were well complained about by the Army hierarchy when they got to hear about it?!?!?!?!?

Mind you, I remember as a kid on the TV - 'All our yesterdays', there was footage of Irish guys with a ground mounted AA MG overlooking a UBoat anchored in one of Eire's 'Neutral' coves. Better still, the Irish chaps were wearing German helmets!!!! How neutral was that???
 
#17
Arthur3bums said:
Mind you, I remember as a kid on the TV - 'All our yesterdays', there was footage of Irish guys with a ground mounted AA MG overlooking a UBoat anchored in one of Eire's 'Neutral' coves. Better still, the Irish chaps were wearing German helmets!!!! How neutral was that???

The Free state army or whitever they called themselves had purchased some coal scuttles off the local surplus uniform dealer.
 

Attachments

#18
There is still some question that a few of O'Duffy's blueshirts served with the Spanish "Blue Division" on the Ostfront. As only 9 of the 15th Bandera stopped behind in 1937 when the remainder were repatriated, this is a pretty moot debate. Low probability that any out of 9 would go on after "their" primary motivation for fighting was concluded satisfactorily, incredibly low potential that they would not have made a big PR buzz either for FG or personal benefit!
 
#19
Arthur3bums:


Mind you, I remember as a kid on the TV - 'All our yesterdays', there was footage of Irish guys with a ground mounted AA MG overlooking a UBoat anchored in one of Eire's 'Neutral' coves. Better still, the Irish chaps were wearing German helmets!!!! How neutral was that???

Much consternation was caused to Allied airman who were shot down in the Free State, the old style "coal scuttle" helmets confused many airmen who thought there new captors were Germans! :lol:
The Free State was'nt really that hostile, after all captured Allied airmen were returned after six months internment. The captured Germans, however, were interned in the Curragh for the duration of hostilities.
So "How neutral was that?" :wink:
 

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