Hiroshima Day

You must have been listening to Canuck CBC this morning --- "The Murkans dropped a big on on Hiroshima all those years ago.".... never minding the Canadians who wound up As POW's as Hong Kong fell and scant sympathy displayed.
I try to make my life as CBC-free as possible, and for that very reason.
 
The Hiroshima Mazda vehicle factories provide a popular UK tourist destination especially the dedicated Roadster plant that has churned out over 32 years the "MX5", Japanese domestic version of "Eunos Roadster", and the North American badge-engineered version of our Mx5, the "Miata".

Over the decades, numerous couples & groups used to write up their conducted tours in the OC Forum but quite notably any start-up discussions regarding the destruction of both cities was regarded as bad form. Locals seem not to want to share opinions with anybody. They did pick up on a few "in house" jokes regarding headlamp deletion in Mk1 design process given they were deemed of no use since the whole car would glow "bright at night" anyway. There were plenty others, but just for them.

They will however point to now classic trams, of which there are around a half dozen or so still in service which were put back to work (!) 3/4 days after the bomb hit.
It's on my bucket list to go there in a few years...we'll see.

Footnote:
If you have around £25/30k going spare, Hiroshima old-school teams will nut & bolt your Mk1 to as new...or better at the factory. Wholly hand built.
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Can you fit me in for a cut and blow?
 
On December 7, 1941, the Japanese committed possibly the most monumental error of judgment in history by kicking the USA in the nuts. It caused the US to crystallise the idea of producing atomic weapons, and with all haste.

Nearly 80 years later, every day I look at a reminder of it. I live on Douglas Lake, Sevier County, Tennessee. On December 7, 1941 I would have been looking at bean fields. On February 2, 1942, construction of Douglas Dam commenced. It involved building a railway spur to the site, a hutted camp for the workers and the dam was complete in February 1943, with 143MW capacity. The lake is 44 sq miles. For comparison, that is equivalent to the combined total of the 12 largest reservoirs in the UK. Or add together all the lakes in the Lake District, the Möhnesee and Edersee and you‘re still nowhere near it.

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This lake is one of 5 in this area, all producing power for the aluminum plant at Alcoa and the to-be-built uranium enrichment plant at Oak Ridge.

The Clinton Engineer Works, as it was originally known, consisted of a number of specific plants, but the key one was K-25, the gaseous diffusion plant. It took until 1944 to build this, it was the largest building in the world at 1.6M sq ft.

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To this day, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 National Security Complex work on nuclear weapons, with the most powerful supercomputer in the world (Summit).

The Los Alamos site, the Hanford site, the B-29 program, the Silverplate program, all were enormous undertakings.

But then I see things like this:

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My only thought is “fvck them”.

I’m just going to go look at the lake for a bit.
 

Chef

LE
I'm fairly sure that Mr Hitler would have used them on the UK if he'd had a viable weapon.
I believe that one of the reasons the Germans didn't deploy their chemical and nerve agents was Hitler's fear that the allies would respond in spades.

Something overlooked by the CND in their campaigns.

Plus the habit armies have always had of using anything to prevent a level playing field.
 

endure

GCM
I believe that one of the reasons the Germans didn't deploy their chemical and nerve agents was Hitler's fear that the allies would respond in spades.

Something overlooked by the CND in their campaigns.

Plus the habit armies have always had of using anything to prevent a level playing field.
Another theory is that the German physicists (especially Heisenberg) kept the fact a secret as they didn't want it to get into the hands of the military.

 
On December 7, 1941, the Japanese committed possibly the most monumental error of judgment in history by kicking the USA in the nuts. It caused the US to crystallise the idea of producing atomic weapons, and with all haste.

(snipped for brevity)
Excellent post.

I think it is arguable whether the biggest error is history was Pearl Harbour or Grofaz declaring war on the USA shortly afterwards.

The fact that he declared war on the mightiest industrial machine in history (well evidenced in your post) might lead to the latter being the worst decision making ever.
 
Another theory is that the German physicists (especially Heisenberg) kept the fact a secret as they didn't want it to get into the hands of the military.



Nah, Werner Heisenberg was another self justifying Nazi who rewrote the facts after the war to fit his new 'I was a good German' truth.
And the real truth was, he simply got his maths wrong and went off on the wrong path from first principles.

The Americans relied on 'Jew Science' as Hitler called it and worked out they could build a bomb using pounds of Uranium.

Hiesenburg used idiologically pure German Science and calculated a bomb needed tonnes of Uranium.


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Excellent post.

I think it is arguable whether the biggest error is history was Pearl Harbour or Grofaz declaring war on the USA shortly afterwards.

The fact that he declared war on the mightiest industrial machine in history (well evidenced in your post) might lead to the latter being the worst decision making ever.
Good post but you also missed out the final piece in "Three worst mistakes ever made" in

"If we invade the USSR the whole country will collapse within three months"
 
Anyone with the slightest sympathy would do well to read this first hand experience of Jack Edwards, who I had the pleasure to meet in the Tamar mess: 'Banzai you Bastards'
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For a good worms eye view of attitudes to the Japanese and Japan, Rites Of Passage by Samuel Hynes is thoroughly recommended. He was a USN aviator in the Pacific and him and his colleagues gave very few f*cks for the Japanese getting nuked. Job jobbed.

For an eagles eye overview of possibly WHY they should have been nuked a bit more The Knights Of Bushido by Lord Russell of Liverpool should do the job nicely. (Possibly searchable as Edward Russell).

(Personally, I am glad they weren't really as they have evolved into a pretty excellent country. Deeply weird people notwithstanding).
 

endure

GCM
For a good worms eye view of attitudes to the Japanese and Japan, Rites Of Passage by Samuel Hynes is thoroughly recommended. He was a USN aviator in the Pacific and him and his colleagues gave very few f*cks for the Japanese getting nuked. Job jobbed.

For an eagles eye overview of possibly WHY they should have been nuked a bit more The Knights Of Bushido by Lord Russell of Liverpool should do the job nicely. (Possibly searchable as Edward Russell).

(Personally, I am glad they weren't really as they have evolved into a pretty excellent country. Deeply weird people notwithstanding).
Of all the places I visited in the merch Japan is the one place where I'd like to have spend a long time exploring the place partly because the people are deeply weird.
 
Of all the places I visited in the merch Japan is the one place where I'd like to have spend a long time exploring the place partly because the people are deeply weird.
James May did a very entertaining Japan tour over 6 episodes recently.
Thoroughly recommended, just for the weirdo's he meets along the way.
 
Deeply weird indeed. I’ve posted this before, but just how the fvck did they hope to win? Smiting Pearl Harbor is one thing. To actually win, you have to occupy the ground. Which means assaulting through the Sierra Nevada, the Cascades, then the Rocky Mountains, crossing the likes of the Grand Canyon, Death Valley, thousands of miles of prairie (ie fvck all), enormous rivers, more mountains in Appalachia, more enormous rivers. Large tranches of land are dense forests. Not conducive to offensive ops, but perfect for defending.

The Rockies alone are 3000 miles long and extend to 14000ft in elevation. No chance whatsoever of victory. Stupidity beyond belief.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
75th anniversary. For those of a nervous disposition, avoid the BBC website - all about the horrors inflicted on innocent little Japan, and if they could work Donald Trump into the narrative, they would... maybe he had an uncle sweeping the mess of the 509th Composite Group? That would be good enough.

Do the japs celebrate it with fireworks?
 
Deeply weird indeed. I’ve posted this before, but just how the fvck did they hope to win? Smiting Pearl Harbor is one thing. To actually win, you have to occupy the ground. Which means assaulting through the Sierra Nevada, the Cascades, then the Rocky Mountains, crossing the likes of the Grand Canyon, Death Valley, thousands of miles of prairie (ie fvck all), enormous rivers, more mountains in Appalachia, more enormous rivers. Large tranches of land are dense forests. Not conducive to offensive ops, but perfect for defending.

The Rockies alone are 3000 miles long and extend to 14000ft in elevation. No chance whatsoever of victory. Stupidity beyond belief.
The idea, as I understand it, was to make it impossible for the US to respond for the initial period of the war. At which point the Japanese charge round hoover up everything (Inc India and possibly Aus, I forget if that was in the master plan), and then the US would shrug its shoulders and say "ok then. We'll let that one slide.", and everyone would be happy.

Can you see where they went wrong?

Don't forget the Japanese saw themselves as the master race. The Germans were amateurs when it came to that idea, the Japanese really were that deranged. For example Nomonhan is a fascinating campaign/battle because an awful lot of their planning assumed they would win because they were Japanese. They had a habit of issuing vague orders on what they'd like to happen. As it logically would in their own little world.

I've used this picture as a joke to illustrate Japanese command before, still fits:


As I said earlier, do not consider the Japanese mental situation before the end of WWII as something we today can recognise, it is a totally alien culture.
 
Deeply weird indeed. I’ve posted this before, but just how the fvck did they hope to win? Smiting Pearl Harbor is one thing. To actually win, you have to occupy the ground. Which means assaulting through the Sierra Nevada, the Cascades, then the Rocky Mountains, crossing the likes of the Grand Canyon, Death Valley, thousands of miles of prairie (ie fvck all), enormous rivers, more mountains in Appalachia, more enormous rivers. Large tranches of land are dense forests. Not conducive to offensive ops, but perfect for defending.

The Rockies alone are 3000 miles long and extend to 14000ft in elevation. No chance whatsoever of victory. Stupidity beyond belief.
At the risk of sounding like a Philip K Dick walt I always assumed the plan must go something along the lines of Germany capturing the east coast, Japan capturing LA, SF, San Diego etc on the west coast and the innards of the USA falling into place. With assistance in the interior from America First and the German American Bund.

I hate Illinois Nazi's.

And possibly attacking the US from Canada having captured Britain and nominally Canada by default. Maybe not though.
 
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