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Hiroshima Day

Well if we try that in Japanese syllables, it would be de-bah-s-tah-teh-doh. The s in the middle would be "soo" if fully pronounced but sometimes the syllable for "soo", or "su" in standard roman letter format, would be reduced to just the s consonant sound.
Worra bah-s-tah-teh-doh dear, never mind.
 

clothears

War Hero
Thanks for that.
I've read a good few accounts of the US internment of Americans of Japanese ancestry and also took the opportunity to visit Manzanar, the preserved internment camp which is situated between Death Valley and the eastern entrance to Yosemite.
But it's only recently that I've discovered to my surprise, how more harshly, compared to the US, were the Japanese living in British Columbia treated- families were usually separated with the men going off to road gangs or farm work in the interior.
In contrast to the US where the camps were emptied by VJ day, Japanese Canadians who have been evacuated from the west coast weren't allowed to return until 1949.

A couple of quotes from Wiki:

"Born in Canada, brought up on big-band jazz, Fred Astaire and the novels of Henry Rider Haggard, I had perceived myself to be as Canadian as the beaver. I hated rice. I had committed no crime. I was never charged, tried or convicted of anything. Yet I was fingerprinted and interned."
Ken Adachi

"It is the government's plan to get these people out of B.C. as fast as possible. It is my personal intention, as long as I remain in public life, to see they never come back here. Let our slogan be for British Columbia: ‘No Japs from the Rockies to the seas."
Ian Mackenzie, Minister of Pensions

One refreshing thing that crops up in accounts of internment in the US is the acknowledgment and gratitude of the internees to a very small number of American volunteers who helped in the internees various ways like the education of the children in the camps.

Wiki Link; Internment of Japanese Canadians

The thing I noticed growing up in BC was the old Japanese and Chinese families did their best to assimilate. Most of my classmates did not speak Japanese or any Chinese dialect. A few families who were third generation were starting to send the children to Saturday school to learn the language and be able to read it. They were mainly Chinese. Our next door neighbours children never learnt Japanese. They followed traditions but also celebrated all the Christian holidays. It was the same with the "old" Sikh families. The men usually cut their hair and worked in the lumber industry. The women stayed home. The children were raised Western and could only speak the basics in Gujarati.

The westcoast Japanese owned the bulk of the salmon fleet in the late 30s. Many of the families that bought the fleet during the government sell off were of Scandanavian descent and back in the 70s and 80s used their money to buy into British Properities (a pretty exclusive enclave of old money, and new money now)

Japan Town was interesting back in my youth. Now it's a rundown, junkie haven in the downtown eastside. My parents friends would be rolling in the urns if they could see it now.
 
The BBC was at it again on the 9am news covering the anniversary of Nagasaki and Ben Brown interviewing a bright eyed female academic from Nagasaki University.
First question from Ben Brown: 'And how much hatred do the Japanese have for the Americans'? She'd obviously not been told about the Rape of Nanking, the Burma-Siam railway etc. If I was Japanese, I would be more concerned about the residual hatred held for the Japanese by the Chinese, the Koreans, the Philipinos, not to mention anyone else in the area with a well honed grudge.
A survivor from Hiroshima who was directly under the blast but in a bank vault has visited many countries to talk of her experience in a bid for peace and reconciliation.

She said that whenever people from different countries speak to her in person afterwards she let's them speak first about what Japan did to their country, and she listen to them first, politely with a slightly bowed head.

I'd take her opinion over some youngster whose experience adds up to sod all.

Additionally there's an interesting videos on YT from Mark Felton Productions that talks about the proposed use of Lancasters to drop the atom bombs as the B29 wasn't capable and had to be hugely modified.
 
B-29? Top bombing!

25942C95-DF88-4713-8E1E-892B7924810B.jpeg
 
I'm not sure that I believe Boeing's claims. Take an aircraft, load it up to its design limit, then strap on an extra 20 tons (plus the weight of the bomb racks)?

Even without the internal payload, slapping on two Grand Slams must have done wonders for drag and lift.
 
I'm not sure that I believe Boeing's claims. Take an aircraft, load it up to its design limit, then strap on an extra 20 tons (plus the weight of the bomb racks)?

Even without the internal payload, slapping on two Grand Slams must have done wonders for drag and lift.
Would have been the USAAF doing the testing
 
"...external racks developed by Boeing-Wichita" suggests that Boeing were involved in the design.

well, yes, it was their bomber after all, but the testing was done by the USAAF.
it was intended to use both Tallboy and Grand Slam bombs against Japanese targets for the invasion.
 
I'm not sure that I believe Boeing's claims. Take an aircraft, load it up to its design limit, then strap on an extra 20 tons (plus the weight of the bomb racks)?

Even without the internal payload, slapping on two Grand Slams must have done wonders for drag and lift.
After WWII the US did a joint project with the UK testing the ability of large bombs to penetrate thick concrete, using German u-boat pens as targets. It was called "Project Ruby".

Here's the project report, as a very long and hard to read scanned PDF.
Comparative Test of the Effectiveness of Large Bombs Against Reinforced Concrete Structures Anglo-American Bomb Tests Project 'Ruby'

The Americans built copies of the Tall Boy and Grand Slam and these were dropped from B-29s. The British dropped their versions from Lancasters. The British also tested a rocket assisted bomb called the "Disney Bomb".

There's no information that I could see with regards to how the US mounted the bombs in the B-29 or how many it carried. The report itself was focused on the effects the bombs had on the thick concrete and just mentions the planes in passing.
 
There's no information that I could see with regards to how the US mounted the bombs in the B-29 or how many it carried. The report itself was focused on the effects the bombs had on the thick concrete and just mentions the planes in passing.
The captions to the photos in post #304 indicate that the Grand Slams were carried on external bomb racks (also shown in the photos). The captions also indicate that while the Grand Slams were carried externally, the normal internal bomb load could also be carried. As I make it out, that's 3x its maximum short-distance, low-altitude payload. And that's just allowing for weight - drag and turbulence would also be factors that would have an adverse effect on performance and range.

I wouldn't be greatly surprised if it ran out of fuel and burnt out its engines before it managed to get airborne. Or somebody is exaggerating its payload.
 
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syrup

LE
I see reports today that the BBC have removed Kipling's Mandalay from their VJ concert at the weekend.
The chap who was supposed to sing it objected to it's racist lyrics.

I assume at some point a full apology will be read out for us being a touch nasty towards the peace loving people of Japan.
 
I see reports today that the BBC have removed Kipling's Mandalay from their VJ concert at the weekend.
The chap who was supposed to sing it objected to it's racist lyrics.

I assume at some point a full apology will be read out for us being a touch nasty towards the peace loving people of Japan.

What's a poem written 50 odd years before hand got to do with VJ day? Best I can see is because it mentions Burma?
(Disclaimer: I've never been a fan of Kipling's work)
 

syrup

LE
What's a poem written 50 odd years before hand got to do with VJ day? Best I can see is because it mentions Burma?
(Disclaimer: I've never been a fan of Kipling's work)


Apparently it was put to music and was a favourite of the lads out there.
Nothing they liked more than a sing sing while building those railways
 

nanayon

Clanker
I see reports today that the BBC have removed Kipling's Mandalay from their VJ concert at the weekend.
The chap who was supposed to sing it objected to it's racist lyrics.

I assume at some point a full apology will be read out for us being a touch nasty towards the peace loving people of Japan.

If an apology is read out, it would be entirely out of the politically driven political correctness kind of thinking outside of Japan. The Japanese overall aren't asking for an apology.

Here are 3 surveys to show that. All were taken around the time Obama visited Hiroshima in 2016.

The first one was conducted by Asahi (Left-wing).

"How do you feel about the dropping of the Atomic Bomb"

31% Inhumane and cannot be forgiven

33% Inhumane but not deeply rooted in it

22% For the US, it was necessary course of action

8% It was war so was natural

Out of the 31% that said "Inhumane and cannot be forgiven", 89% appreciated Obama's visit.


Second survey was conducted by Sankei (right-wing) and FNN.

"Do you appraise Obama's visit to Hiroshima"

97.5% yes

Should Obama have made an apology during the visit?

68.2% No, I don't think so


For the third one, 65.1% expected just a visit to Hiroshima memorial. Only 6.9% expected an apology.
 
The captions to the photos in post #304 indicate that the Grand Slams were carried on external bomb racks (also shown in the photos). The captions also indicate that while the Grand Slams were carried externally, the normal internal bomb load could also be carried. As I make it out, that's 3x its maximum short-distance, low-altitude payload. And that's just allowing for weight - drag and turbulence would also be factors that would have an adverse effect on performance and range.

I wouldn't be greatly surprised if it ran out of fuel and burnt out its engines before it managed to get airborne. Or somebody is exaggerating its payload.

for the proposed bombing raids, mostly on the Japanese rail network, and under sea rail tunnels, the bombers would have been configured as per low altitude firebombing raids.
all guns bar the rear ones removed, along with all the armour, saving tonnes of weight and deleting a few crew. They would have carried extra fuel in bomb bay tanks.

overloaded? Well yes, but so what? It’s not as of the USAAF was short of B-29’s or spare engines if they wore them out
also, production was to switch to the B-29C with more powerful fuel injected engines in The fall of 1945, 5,000 ordered, and the B-29D with The much better and much more powerful duplex cyclone engines and a lighter wing that raised its max weight by 40,000lbs had flown in May 1945 and had also been ordered into production. It would be renamed the B-50 after the war.

fwiw, RAF lancasters carrying Grand Slams also operated about their maximum designed load.

and 42,000 lb bomb load? USAAF trial drops of their T-12 ‘super’ Grand Slam were done with a B-29.
 
They would have carried extra fuel in bomb bay tanks.
The text said "capable of carrying its normal internal bomb load or bomb bay fuel tanks" (in addition to 2 Grand Slams). If it has the internal bomb load, there's no extra fuel to offset the payload overload.
 

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