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Hill walking stupidity


Looks like a possible solution to me
Apart from strong gusty winds, updrafts, poor visibility and limited battery life. Otherwise all good.
 
And a little wobble on landing that ends up with smashed teeth and claret alles uber die platz.
 
You will always find Crib Goch quiet....even so, I avoid Snowdon Massif these days, the Sports Direct/GoOutdoors crowd have ruined it

Bit of a drift, not so much on the hill, more on the road, the North Coast 500. Discovered it years ago, when it was just a quiet backwater. I'm not speaking from a selfish viewpoint, more a practical one. It's all they say in the bumf, but what about the infrastructure? Eating facilities, B & B, single track roads which very few are used to, and most importantly, toilets! I've no problem with finding a bush, others way not be so happy. Don't know if things have changed since it was first thought of, if so Fairy*'nuff, if not it's going to be a wee problem until it's sorted. Drift over.

*Lobby Dosser fans know who I mean.
 

TamH70

MIA
I'll not invest then, I heard somebody has a bridge for sale, maybe i'll go for that
Aye, l have an opportunity for to buy the famous "Squinty Bridge" in the business district of Glasgow. Yours for twelve cases of Glenmorangie. Interested?
 
Apart from strong gusty winds, updrafts, poor visibility and limited battery life. Otherwise all good.
And bugger all phone signal in many rural areas, particularly the wilder bits.
 

A.N.Other

Old-Salt
Perhaps a defib is not all that's needed. Good short term solution but trained personnel will be required if there's to be any chance to save the victim.
If they need a defib on the hill they're dead. In an urban setting you have a 2% chance of survival with CPR and a quick ambulance response. Odds go up to 10% if there is quick access to an AED.

Those odds are pretty bad. On the hill if you need an AED the time taken to get it to you basically brings the odds to near 0%. Even if you are getting CPR that needs to be maintained all the while you're being carried off the hill.

The only thing that could save a cardiac arrest, MI or similar is if an air ambulance or coastguard heli gets to you bloody quick.
 

TamH70

MIA
Fool or empties?
Thank you for bringing that to my attention. I will be having words with my proof-reader re. the matter in question.
The bottles, of course, should be full of whisky - Glenmorangie whisky.
 
If they need a defib on the hill they're dead. In an urban setting you have a 2% chance of survival with CPR and a quick ambulance response. Odds go up to 10% if there is quick access to an AED.

Those odds are pretty bad. On the hill if you need an AED the time taken to get it to you basically brings the odds to near 0%. Even if you are getting CPR that needs to be maintained all the while you're being carried off the hill.

The only thing that could save a cardiac arrest, MI or similar is if an air ambulance or coastguard heli gets to you bloody quick.
A rather sobering conversation when someone brought up the use of epi-pens when in the countryside with a paramedic on a first aid course.

The conclusion was that the adrenaline from the first self-administered injection should last the person suffering anaphylaxis about 10 minutes and their mate should by then be ready to stick them with the backup pen for another 10 minutes. If they are still in anaphylaxis by the point the second dose wears off they'd better hope their other mate had phoned us immediately and we know where they are, otherwise the minibus / ambulance will arrive to a corpse. Out in wild country a severe allergic reaction is essentially a death sentence.

It didn't put off kids who needed epi-pens but did mean some rather frank conversations with their parents about acceptable risks.
 
If they need a defib on the hill they're dead. In an urban setting you have a 2% chance of survival with CPR and a quick ambulance response. Odds go up to 10% if there is quick access to an AED.

Those odds are pretty bad. On the hill if you need an AED the time taken to get it to you basically brings the odds to near 0%. Even if you are getting CPR that needs to be maintained all the while you're being carried off the hill.

The only thing that could save a cardiac arrest, MI or similar is if an air ambulance or coastguard heli gets to you bloody quick.
Agreed - that said, there are a few instances where arrest can happen due to complications during treatment - an example would be a severe hypothermia case and cold blood from the extremes gets to the heart when the cas is moved/packaged - but we also know that the odds are if a defib is used, it'll probably be on one of our own team...
 
From the attached:

“I managed to find somewhere to park and I had planned to take a quieter route up the mountain – but there were no quieter routes,” he said.

You will always find Crib Goch quiet....even so, I avoid Snowdon Massif these days, the Sports Direct/GoOutdoors crowd have ruined it
I've seen queues on Crib Goch. Caused by a pushchair on the first occasion, a terrified and massive husky on the second occasion and by RAMC trying to carry a fridge (fitted with a rucksack back-frame) on the third occasion... :roll:
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Bit of a drift, not so much on the hill, more on the road, the North Coast 500. Discovered it years ago, when it was just a quiet backwater. I'm not speaking from a selfish viewpoint, more a practical one. It's all they say in the bumf, but what about the infrastructure? Eating facilities, B & B, single track roads which very few are used to, and most importantly, toilets! I've no problem with finding a bush, others way not be so happy. Don't know if things have changed since it was first thought of, if so Fairy*'nuff, if not it's going to be a wee problem until it's sorted. Drift over.

*Lobby Dosser fans know who I mean.

NC500 has been covered on the following threads.

This year's holiday
Anybody into wild camping
And the thread called
NC500
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
A rather sobering conversation when someone brought up the use of epi-pens when in the countryside with a paramedic on a first aid course.

A funnier aside was the time of the big TA exercises to Germany in the early eighties when we worried about the first Landrover door being slammed which would result in the use of Atropine pens being stabbed into their own extremities.
 
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