Hill walking stupidity

Mr Tweedy

Old-Salt
I like the idea of being 'duty bastard'.

AsterixTG is out on the hill and rescues someone with hypothermia due to trying to cross the Talybont reservoir on a lilo - "Terribly sorry about all that bother sir, if you'll just hold on a sec Brian will be over to call you a ******* stupid ******* **** any moment now"
I would have given you like and a funny if I could.

Problem with that idea is that there would be too many volunteers for that duty. I would be permanently dicking myself for that....
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
I would be permanently dicking myself for that....
No, no, no. We'd do all that stuff while you're out doing the 'rescuing' bit. After all, there's no sense in overworking you.
 
I went to pick someone up from Fort William who was climbing Ben Nevis that day. I arrived a bit early so took the dog out the car and trudged up the footpath for about 45 mins before heading down again. It was a glorious day but I'd say only about 50% of the people I saw were carrying rucksacks, water, maps etc. One woman was walking up in high heels. Insane.
 
Meanwhile, it's all teary hugs and kumbaya round the campfire in Fort Billy.


Four men rescued from Ben Nevis in high winds and blizzard conditions have apologised to, and thanked, their rescuers.

Lochaber Mountain Rescue Team and Inverness Coastguard helicopter went to the aid of the tourists, who were not equipped for winter hillwalking.

Following Monday's incident, they have sent the team a donation along with gifts of whisky, wine and chocolates.

Lochaber MRT has thanked the men for the "generous offer".

....

Responding to calls on social media for people to take out insurance before heading into Scotland's hills, or for people to be charged for being rescued, the team said such measures would be unworkable.

"Where do you stop? Insurance for fishing, rugby, football all of which have more incidents and injuries than mountaineering?" said the team.

The team said efforts should be focused on increasing awareness of mountain safety and weather forecasts, adding that the rescued four men should be "cut a little bit of slack".
 
I went to pick someone up from Fort William who was climbing Ben Nevis that day. I arrived a bit early so took the dog out the car and trudged up the footpath for about 45 mins before heading down again. It was a glorious day but I'd say only about 50% of the people I saw were carrying rucksacks, water, maps etc. One woman was walking up in high heels. Insane.
And how many booties were walking up in high heels?
 
Walking up Ben Nevis in a blizzard?

Surely no more difficult than nipping to the newsagent for your daily paper?

[/sarcasm off]
 
And how many booties were walking up in high heels?
Not quite " high heels " but certainly on the subject and also relating to trainers ..... when my son was about 13 years old and he walked the Lyke Wake Walk with me he was fully kitted out and wearing boots .... what he did not know was in my Rucksack were a pair of his trainers .... unusually the weather was kind for the whole of the walk .... about 4k from the end I gave him his trainers at Jugger Beck which he tackled like a spring heeled jack and almost bounded up the climb from the beck .
 
Nothing much wrong with a good pair of training shoes IN THE RIGHT CONDITIONS.

For clarity, Ben Nevis in winter is most definitely not the right conditions.
 
I like the idea of being 'duty bastard'.

AsterixTG is out on the hill and rescues someone with hypothermia due to trying to cross the Talybont reservoir on a lilo - "Terribly sorry about all that bother sir, if you'll just hold on a sec Brian will be over to call you a ******* stupid ******* **** any moment now"
Mind if I put that to the leadership committee next meeting?
 
Nothing much wrong with a good pair of training shoes IN THE RIGHT CONDITIONS.

For clarity, Ben Nevis in winter is most definitely not the right conditions.
I went up Snowdon in running shoes fine the other week, but then I did have crampons on me just in case, torches, maps, compass, emergency whistle, emergency bivvy bag, phone charger, spare batteries, enough food and water to get by for 3 days etc...

I'm diabetic and tootle around quite happily, it's knowing your limits that's the thing as well as having the gear you need not what people think you need
 
I went up Snowdon in running shoes fine the other week, but then I did have crampons on me just in case, torches, maps, compass, emergency whistle, emergency bivvy bag, phone charger, spare batteries, enough food and water to get by for 3 days etc...
And you were on the train...
 
And you were on the train...
Lol the train doesn't run in winter, usually the train track is the awkward bit it gets slippery at the slightest bit of ice

You don't expect to slip up there

Conditions at the summit are normally a bit bleak for tourists even if the train could manage it in winter

snowdon (2).jpg
 
Many moons ago I was with a YHA group doing a coast walk from Scarborough to Whitby. All of out crew (about 15 of us) had a small-ish pack with a change of clothes, toilet gear and training shoes - it was a weekend trip, train form Leeds to Scabby, stop off at Boggle Hole YHA, bus from Whitby to Scabby and home.

On the trip we overtook a young couple who were wearing all of the latest Goretex jackets, gaiters, expensive boots, waterbottles and the size of rucksacks that the Marines were carrying when they yomped across the Falklands. We later found out that they were on a long weekend walk and were staying at the same youth hostels that we were!

It was July and the weather forecast was set fine for the week.
 
At the other end of the spectrum, on a diving holiday in the Red Sea, I decided to have a stroll into the desert...... wonderful.

Took about 3 litres of water and used it all.

Just on the point of turning around, and heading back, I was stopped by a sweaty overweight couple asking me where the next cafe was........
 
One woman was walking up in high heels. Insane.
Not quite mountaineering, but a few years ago we (long haired CO and I) visited St Michaels Mount. It's a steep walk on and uneven surface to get to the top and a sign advises that stout footware is needed. Steep learning curve for me, I'd never realised that flip flops and high heels are classed as stout footware.
 
Not quite mountaineering, but a few years ago we (long haired CO and I) visited St Michaels Mount. It's a steep walk on and uneven surface to get to the top and a sign advises that stout footware is needed. Steep learning curve for me, I'd never realised that flip flops and high heels are classed as stout footware.
were the long haired CO’s feet OK in the flip flops?
 

TamH70

MIA
were the long haired CO’s feet OK in the flip flops?
Are you saying that Drlligaf was the one in the high heels? I wasn't aware that he was a Bootie.
 
One and all rest assured we have appropriate footwear. I use Meindl and the Boss uses Lowa.
In public that is.
 

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