Hill walking stupidity

Going out in bad weather is fine if you know what you're doing, and still can be if you don't know what you're doing and scale down your expectations

Take Cwm Idwal, the path there is good no matter what

Been up there in storm force gales, blizzards, torrential rain, meh all fine

If the weathers that bad, stay on the path and don't go climbing the rock face or up Devil's Kitchen

Simples, it's not rocket science
 
Going out in bad weather is fine if you know what you're doing, and still can be if you don't know what you're doing and scale down your expectations

Take Cwm Idwal, the path there is good no matter what

Been up there in storm force gales, blizzards, torrential rain, meh all fine

If the weathers that bad, stay on the path and don't go climbing the rock face or up Devil's Kitchen

Simples, it's not rocket science
Unfortunately "simples" appears to be a good description of certain people who venture out.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
This pair were very lucky to survive. Total respect to Cairngorm MRT they went above and beyond what anyone would reasonably expect of them.
Climbers rescued in 'ferocious weather'
The woman was treated for the effects of hypothermia by the rescue team members.
Sharing body heat naked in a gonk bag with the bint was the male climber's plan from the start.
Don't think he'd factored in the twenty-two members of the MRT going through her first.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
- Pay the full cost of the rescue

- A month in jail

- Pay for the privilege of your 4 week stay
- Yes.

- No... until such time as stupid is legislated against, it is a primary human right to be stupid. They have committed no offence for which they could be prosecuted and jailed.

- No... for the reason above.
 

wheel

LE
Some interesting numbers from the Lake District MRTs

Mountain rescue teams in the Lake District say they have had their busiest year on record.

The 12 volunteer teams dealt with 654 emergency call-outs in 2018, compared with 627 the previous year.

Lake District Search and Mountain Rescue Association chairman Richard Warren said volunteers had answered a "significantly bigger" number of 999 calls than in previous years.
A "big cause for concern" was the 180 avoidable call-outs last year, Mr Warren said.

People got lost "mainly due to no preparation or little preparation, no understanding of navigation, no map, compass, torch", he said.
 
There is a mountain rescue team in a piddly little village in the flattest part of the flattest area of the East Anglian flatlands. To be fair to them, they have probably heard of mountains. They may even have seen pictures of mountains but rescues from mountains? In East Anglia?

Pidley Mountain Rescue Team

Despite the lack of very large topographical features in Pidleyshire though, they do great things..

I may have mentioned the Pidley Mountain Rescue Team before... no apologies if I have
 

Pisseduppardre

Old-Salt
There is a mountain rescue team in a piddly little village in the flattest part of the flattest area of the East Anglian flatlands. To be fair to them, they have probably heard of mountains. They may even have seen pictures of mountains but rescues from mountains? In East Anglia?

Pidley Mountain Rescue Team

Despite the lack of very large topographical features in Pidleyshire though, they do great things..

I may have mentioned the Pidley Mountain Rescue Team before... no apologies if I have
They look like a very handy organisation. Good job they don't have any mountains around or they would not have enough time for their other activities.
 
These are the sort of folks that are allergic to say peanuts but still require a warning labels on the bags of peanuts stating this packets contains peanuts.

Those labels should be removed and nature allowed to take it's course
Or cups of hot coffee marked 'warning contents are hot' FFS.
 
D

Deleted 60082

Guest
Our home is in Keswick so we know the Lake District quite well, although we don’t do as much walking as we should. Even though we know the fells quite well, my daysack always has a compass, small Maglite, a map, a couple of energy bars (check that the kids and/or mice haven’t snaffled them), box of matches and a small, but quite well equipped, first-aid kit. But most of the time I wear rugby shorts, a fleece and waterproof top. In my backpack I’ll have some over trousers if the weather is a bit inclement. Growing up in New Zealand, it was compulsory to wear shorts and I spent most of my formative years up-and-down the Southern Alps in nothing more than boots, shorts and a rugby jersey, with an oilskin tied around my waist and I should point out that the weather is not too different from the United Kingdom. So, if you’re in the Lake District and you see a slightly oddly dressed chap with a strange accent, fabulous legs, well equipped day sack and with a slightly mad golden retriever, chances are that will be me.

I’ve never needed to use the equipment in my pack but on one walk we came across a couple with a husband who clearly wasn’t very well. It seems he was having a heart attack and my wife (a cardio thoracic nurse) diagnosed this situation and calmed them both down, whilst I jogged down to Rossthwaite to call mountain rescue team (this was about 20 years ago when there was virtually no mobile coverage in Borrowdale Valley).
 
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I spent the Christmas break walking in Snowdonia. The wind and low mist made any walking above 650 ft very risky so I stayed at lower levels. The best day was December 24th Christmas Eve the weather was glorious for walking. Even so the unexpected can happen. I saw the MRT responding to this unlucky fellow.
Cardiff man named as rock fall victim
Listening to Mal Pope* on Radio Wales over Xmas, I heard an MRT member (ex-Plod) saying the Snowdon team had dealt with 130 rescues in 2018. His lot (forget which area) were only up to 82.
= = = = =
*Stonkernote: Beats seven bells outta listening to Vanessa Feltz on R2!!
 
There is a mountain rescue team in a piddly little village in the flattest part of the flattest area of the East Anglian flatlands. To be fair to them, they have probably heard of mountains. They may even have seen pictures of mountains but rescues from mountains? In East Anglia?

Pidley Mountain Rescue Team

Despite the lack of very large topographical features in Pidleyshire though, they do great things..

I may have mentioned the Pidley Mountain Rescue Team before... no apologies if I have
There are several "Lowland" Rescue Teams in areas without mountains.
 
Some interesting numbers from the Lake District MRTs

Mountain rescue teams in the Lake District say they have had their busiest year on record.

The 12 volunteer teams dealt with 654 emergency call-outs in 2018, compared with 627 the previous year....
I think it's one of the Lakeland teams that give total man-hours in their incident reports. Shows the scale of volunteer effort better than just giving the number of members turning out.
 
I think it's one of the Lakeland teams that give total man-hours in their incident reports. Shows the scale of volunteer effort better than just giving the number of members turning out.
Yet they struggle for funding, even when helping out with things like the flooding at carlisle & Cockermouth & subsequently ruined kit.
I don't believe in formal gov't funding but bunging them some ad hoc cash from the public purse every now & then would seem reasonable. same goes for lifeboats.
 
I've been laughed at for carrying a map, what you've got that for grandad we can navigate on our smartphone or similar

Except that old fashioned maps work where phone signals are weak or non existent and don't run need batteries, same with an effing compass
I know a range in Scotland where a compass can get you killed in bad conditions. The Black Cuillin.
 

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