Hill walking stupidity

Everything helps.

Had a recent rescue (December) up just North of Fan-Brycheiniog (I think there was the picture shown of it earlier in the thread) - blowing a hoolie into our faces as we approached the approximate location, then we saw their light, then heard their whistles, I replied with three blasts back regularly of a decent loud whistle. Stopped when we got close. They never heard a thing, just saw our lamps getting closer.
I think I know the solution to this. The reason they were lost is-they had no idea how to say or describe to anyone where they were exactly-as all the hills are named in silly squiggle where an average word is worth 28 points at scrabble.
Perhaps name the hills something more sensible like-Hill 1, Hill 2 and so on.

to be honest-I think the porridge woggs are pushing boundaries and taking the piss with a few of theirs also.

All in all-I think there's actually a strong case for making their national languages Morse code with a dedicated list of standard abbreviations for their common used phrases. Wouldnt need to be too long of a list and-It would make it far easier to tell what exactly they are complaining about when they do speak.
;)
 
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Hadn't you, I'm surprised? Standard mountain distress signal, six flashes or whistles, three to respond when you hear it.

Is "SOS mode" the Morse, dot dot dot etc,? I've only got torches with a strobe function.
I've never heard of the "six flashes for trouble". I have heard it for whistles though. Makes sense that it should be the same for torches when I think about it.

I've heard with shooters in distress, it's three shots in quick succession.

Most of the flashlights I've been looking into lately have all had five modes. High, medium, low, SOS and strobe. The SOS mode is the flashlight flashing the morse code for SOS. These modes are all normally activated by a dodgy "half press" of the power switch. Here's a video showing a typical cheap torch with different modes.


It's been a bastard to find a flashlights that doesn't have all these useless modes to be honest. My biggest problems is that it is a crapshoot as to wether or not a torch remembers what mode it was in when you turned it off. I've used flashlights that remember what mode they were in for an hour after I've used them so I turn them on to find they're strobing or blasting out SOS, yet other times it can instantly forget as I'm cycling through the modes to get to the one I want. The shitty power button most of them come with is a pain to deal with when trying to get the right mode.

I've found a nice one for almost $40 from my hardware store that only has two modes, high and low and it always cycles high, low then off. No farting about with what mode you were in when turned off. It's a bloody bright torch in a small size factor and has a really nice zoomable head on it.

I've started replacing most of my existing torches with this particular model. I can't wait to take it out on my next hunting trip in May for spotlighting.
 
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Scunner

Old-Salt
Thanks. I'll stick with the Six.

Sorry to bang on, but how well/how far does the sound of a whistle carry. Obviously wind direction makes a big difference. I've never managed to get a good volume out of the cheap orange "rescue whistles". Better results with the good old Acme Thunderer
I live in the middle of f*cking nowhere, it's the best place to be !
Noises that don't 'fit' are very noticeable when the background noise is all bird song and the wind in the trees. Heard a whistle blown repeatedly one day and wandered in that direction to see what was up. Couple of miles along the path I found a blind woman, her blind son, a man with dementia and a huge fat bloke wearing smooth soled trainers, who was the 'leader' and had slipped, fallen, broken ankle. The cheap orange whistle was the only thing they had got right. though I'm sure the Thunderer would have been better. Where he'd fallen was about 20 feet downhill from a forest track, so I suggested bum shuffling backwards to the track and I would collect them with the Land Rover and off to hospital, but nope, the bloke wouldn't move an inch. Ended up walking home and calling 999 for them. Ambulance arrived at the house and I expected it to drive round the track to the path, but no, he called for a helicopter. I watched the helicopter land, the blokes getting the stretcher out and then deciding that this bloke was way to heavy to lift. Half an hour later the Sea King arrived and winched the bloke out. Must have cost a fortune for all this messing around, when the ambulance could have driven to within 20 feet of him and he could have moved his fat arse.
Contrast this with my most recent involvement with hill rescue. Got a call to unlock the forest gates to let an ambulance in. Turns out the woman in the nearest house (3 miles) had fallen and broken her ankle, had crawled a few miles towards home, but daylight had gone and was stuck on a steep, icy ridge and needed help. I ended up on one side of her, supporting the broken ankle and stopping her sliding off the ridge as we slid/shuffled her down to where there was space for six blokes and a stretcher.
 
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I am very surprised at people not knowing about whistle blasts when in distress. I had assumed it was still common practice. I guess it shows that assumption is the Mother of All Fcuk-Ups. I always have a whistle when out and about in the wilds (Acme Thunderer for preference) and keep a little one in each first aid kit. Lots of daysacks have small ones built into chest strap clips. I also have an airhorn inline with the inflation hose of my scuba BCD for attracting attention on the water's surface. Proper loud, that is, but less use on a mountain!
 
to be honest-I think the porridge woggs are pushing boundaries and taking the piss with a few of theirs also.
“ok caller, do you know where you are?”
“Near somewhere called Craig Dubh?”
“There’s about eleventybillion Craig Dubhs in Scotland, can you give us another clue?”
“I’m on Ben Doon?”
“Well that’s narrowed it down to about ten, any chance of a grid reference?”
“A what?”
“FFS”
etc
 

jmb3296

War Hero
Have you encountered any use of the what3words app
In the rescues.
I have heard it touted as a solution to map incompetence, but I have concerns it may encourage the incompetents further, particularly if they find themselves in a poor mobile phone reception area, their battery has become chilled or drained of power etc.
It looks to be an interesting back up but no more than that.
 
Have you encountered any use of the what3words app
In the rescues.
I have heard it touted as a solution to map incompetence, but I have concerns it may encourage the incompetents further, particularly if they find themselves in a poor mobile phone reception area, their battery has become chilled or drained of power etc.
It looks to be an interesting back up but no more than that.
Dunno whether it was just my iPhone but, around 18 months ago, on way home from work, it was driving rain, almost gale force winds, and fecking freezing. I was on my bike and the normal road I take was closed for some reason. I was lost so took off my gloves etc and tried to use my satnav to find another route. I was fecker if I could get my numb fingers to do anything of use on the phone and...with the addition of rain pouring on my phone, the phone wasn’t behaving as expected ...pressing the map icon would open up some other app etc.
Better than nothing if up shit creek on a mountain I suppose but...best of luck.
Its hard enough trying to understand what words a distressed person is saying w3w pings them at in a normal weather environment.
 

jmb3296

War Hero
That was largely my take.
Useful for arranging to meet someone in a largely urban environment but all the problems you describe if using it on the hills.
I wouldn’t fancy relying on being able to access it or use it on a phone, in foul weather, cold hands and with drama
 
Have you encountered any use of the what3words app
In the rescues.
I have heard it touted as a solution to map incompetence, but I have concerns it may encourage the incompetents further, particularly if they find themselves in a poor mobile phone reception area, their battery has become chilled or drained of power etc.
It looks to be an interesting back up but no more than that.
A good mate of mine is a first responder on Skye. They use it all the time and it has really speeded up their response times, but it does rely on having a mobile signal.
 
Copied from another thread...

We've had the odd issue with W3W - when they're given/taken down/passed on wrong, and it often ends up like a game of Chinese Whispers and it sometimes doesn't work unfortunately. Maybe back it up with an OS Grid Ref too if poss as even if that's taken down badly, there's a very good chance you'll be close enough or able to work out where it is. Can't do that with W3W.

If you look at the W3W App, the square next to the one you're in is completely different - with a GR, it's 1 digit out.

It's definitely better than nothing, but sadly not fool proof. Still no substitute for a map and knowing where you are, where you've been, what's around you and having that 'big picture' - GPS only gives you the 3m square you're standing in.
 

Tool

LE
Dunno whether it was just my iPhone but, around 18 months ago, on way home from work, it was driving rain, almost gale force winds, and fecking freezing. I was on my bike and the normal road I take was closed for some reason. I was lost so took off my gloves etc and tried to use my satnav to find another route. I was fecker if I could get my numb fingers to do anything of use on the phone and...with the addition of rain pouring on my phone, the phone wasn’t behaving as expected ...pressing the map icon would open up some other app etc.
Better than nothing if up shit creek on a mountain I suppose but...best of luck.
Its hard enough trying to understand what words a distressed person is saying w3w pings them at in a normal weather environment.
I have a Samsung Galaxy S10 that does the same in cold weather. Rain does screw the touch screen a lot, and the cold reduces the sensitivity substantially.
 
I have a Samsung Galaxy S10 that does the same in cold weather. Rain does screw the touch screen a lot, and the cold reduces the sensitivity substantially.
For reference I have one of these - A8 3GB+32GB | AGM Mobile

If you want the latest this and that and a decent camera, forget it, but its' proven itself down to double digit minus temps without any issues or battery degradation, dropped into deep puddles, stepped on, dropped from height, enough memory for loads of maps, seems to go for ages until charge is needed. Normal standard day use leaves around 90% battery, but I don't use it much for browsing etc...

I'll probably only update when the OS starts to creak too much - would go with the same brand again.
 
Have you encountered any use of the what3words app
In the rescues.
I have heard it touted as a solution to map incompetence, but I have concerns it may encourage the incompetents further, particularly if they find themselves in a poor mobile phone reception area, their battery has become chilled or drained of power etc.
It looks to be an interesting back up but no more than that.

Yes, I'm at the age where I'm suspicious of trendy technical things. Nothing wrong with the UK National Grid.
 
I have a Samsung Galaxy S10 that does the same in cold weather. Rain does screw the touch screen a lot, and the cold reduces the sensitivity substantially.

I'd guess the spec says something about recommended operating temperatures. I know "RTFM" is always a last resort, but it might be interesting to check?
 

Tool

LE
I'd guess the spec says something about recommended operating temperatures. I know "RTFM" is always a last resort, but it might be interesting to check?
Dunno about temps, but -10 to +40 Celsius is about normal.
Also "IP68 dust/water resistant (up to 1.5m for 30 mins)"
 

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