Hill walking stupidity

Don’t get me started about the amount of litter being left out in the ooloo nowadays. When out daily with the dogs across the South Downs and other areas of my manor, I always pick up (the odd bit of, as it was then) litter and stowed it in the game pocket of my coat to dispose of. Now I’m taking my roe sack out most days - crisp packets, plastic water bottles, drinks cans, supermarket bags, black bin bags, the aforementioned gloves and socks (socks??) food waste, clingfilm and to top it all, a disposable nappy.

I fear now that the scum have found our green and pleasant land, we’re not going to get it back any time soon.
Seen the footpaths the width of runways , because they do not want to get muddy ?
 
It was another one, there was an issue that the MRT could not set up such a thing due to their charity status I think. See post 1967.

There was a problem with donations after the Penlee Lifeboat disaster. So I can understand the delay in setting up the fund with regard to charity law.
 
Seen the footpaths the width of runways , because they do not want to get muddy ?
There's another train of thought on that. Instead of sticking to the path go well around it, therefore spreading the footprint over a wider area so it's not falling on the same spot.
Another major cause for erosion are mountain bikes. I've noticed this on Dartmoor, When i started walking it 50 years ago it was fine. Paths that had been walked for centuries were still intact. Now in parts they're chewed up, and the tyre marks are there to be seen. I'm not against bikes being used on the moor, just riders to use some sense when riding on a grass surface as opposed to a gritted rocky path. All the weight of the body and pressure of pedalling the bike, plus all the gear is being transferred through the tyres. Instead of going through puddles/soft ground, go around it giving the grass a chance to recover. I give muddy spots as wide a berth as I can. The exception to that is if I'm on boggy ground and there's no easy way round it. Then it's a case of ploutering on till I'm through it. So far I've succeeded. ;)
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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There's another train of thought on that. Instead of sticking to the path go well around it, therefore spreading the footprint over a wider area so it's not falling on the same spot.
Another major cause for erosion are mountain bikes. I've noticed this on Dartmoor, When i started walking it 50 years ago it was fine. Paths that had been walked for centuries were still intact. Now in parts they're chewed up, and the tyre marks are there to be seen. I'm not against bikes being used on the moor, just riders to use some sense when riding on a grass surface as opposed to a gritted rocky path. All the weight of the body and pressure of pedalling the bike, plus all the gear is being transferred through the tyres. Instead of going through puddles/soft ground, go around it giving the grass a chance to recover. I give muddy spots as wide a berth as I can. The exception to that is if I'm on boggy ground and there's no easy way round it. Then it's a case of ploutering on till I'm through it. So far I've succeeded. ;)
20210220_155930.jpg


What path? :)
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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Sentinel

Old-Salt
Over £800k raised for Chris Lewis if Patterdale MRT after he was paralysed in a fall. That is a fantastic response.

 

TamH70

MIA
Yeah, it's a bit funny, but it's also true that it could have been a much different outcome.

I do hope she got the beers in though, and at Icelandic prices, that's going to be a fair few shekels.
Worst one like this we have is when we get a call in saying someone has seen lights being flashed in an emergency fashion up on some ridge - we get there to find half a Battalion of squaddies cutting about but we can't tell that until we get close, so we have to run around after them shouting, 'Are you lost!' - we give it about an hour then sack it.

Probably happens two or three times a year.
 
Worst one like this we have is when we get a call in saying someone has seen lights being flashed in an emergency fashion up on some ridge - we get there to find half a Battalion of squaddies cutting about but we can't tell that until we get close, so we have to run around after them shouting, 'Are you lost!' - we give it about an hour then sack it.

Probably happens two or three times a year.

An interesting problem @AsterixTG. I often see lights high in the hills, various numbers and random movement makes me think it is just people walking. Personally I try to rely on night vision, and I haven't been out in real darkness for a long time.

So, if I was in trouble I'd try to make a more obvious signal, pointing torch towards a farm, village, road junction, trying a few different directions.

But then what? Do people still recognise six flashes as a distress signal? I mean average "youth of today", not regular walkers? Does the smart phone generation even look up towards the hill tops? Would a strobe, white or red, be better at attracting attention? Would a continuous stationary light be noticed as something abnormal?

I'd be interested to know what you think.
 
An interesting problem @AsterixTG. I often see lights high in the hills, various numbers and random movement makes me think it is just people walking. Personally I try to rely on night vision, and I haven't been out in real darkness for a long time.

So, if I was in trouble I'd try to make a more obvious signal, pointing torch towards a farm, village, road junction, trying a few different directions.

But then what? Do people still recognise six flashes as a distress signal? I mean average "youth of today", not regular walkers? Does the smart phone generation even look up towards the hill tops? Would a strobe, white or red, be better at attracting attention? Would a continuous stationary light be noticed as something abnormal?

I'd be interested to know what you think.
Just stay constant 6 whistle blasts and or flashes in each obvious direction every few minutes, and stay in the same place.

At some point you'll be missed & reported as such, spotted or heard.

This assumes you can't call it in. We normally work out last known point by where the car is parked and take it from there.

BTW - we have a system (SARlock) that pings your phone and just requires a text acknowledgment back - lot less signal and power needed than a call, just need to make sure you have GPS Location set on the device. Always keep your phone next to your body - most of the time cold kills the battery unless it's designed as a rugged phone.
 
BTW - if you can get out now/tonight for a bit, walk from home, and it's clear near you, going to be stunning.

I'm just off out to here above the village.

DSC_5092.jpg


Very lucky to live here.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
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BTW - if you can get out now/tonight for a bit, walk from home, and it's clear near you, going to be stunning.

I'm just off out to here above the village.

DSC_5092.jpg


Very lucky to live here.

Moonshadows are always slightly different.
 

Arse Gravy

War Hero
Another act of total lunacy, won't they learn!
A couple and a child had to be rescued after they set up camp on the edge of a cliff in breach of coronavirus restrictions, the coastguard said. Teams from Staithes and Whitby Coastguard were called to reports of two adults and a child camping on a cliff edge in the North York Moors on Saturday.
Just pipped me to the post. Same article from our local comic:


It amazes me, the coastal cliff path is treacherous and is clearly signposted in parts indicating this. Add to this that it's also a favourite suicide spot as well. Could've been a sad entry to the 2021 Darwin awards.
 
Just stay constant 6 whistle blasts and or flashes in each obvious direction every few minutes, and stay in the same place.

At some point you'll be missed & reported as such, spotted or heard.

This assumes you can't call it in. We normally work out last known point by where the car is parked and take it from there.

BTW - we have a system (SARlock) that pings your phone and just requires a text acknowledgment back - lot less signal and power needed than a call, just need to make sure you have GPS Location set on the device. Always keep your phone next to your body - most of the time cold kills the battery unless it's designed as a rugged phone.

Thanks. I'll stick with the Six.

Sorry to bang on, but how well/how far does the sound of a whistle carry. Obviously wind direction makes a big difference. I've never managed to get a good volume out of the cheap orange "rescue whistles". Better results with the good old Acme Thunderer!

I suppose if I was stuck and alone it would be late, there'd be less background noise from traffic etc., but I'm still thinking a light signal would be the best thing.
 
Thanks. I'll stick with the Six.

Sorry to bang on, but how well/how far does the sound of a whistle carry. Obviously wind direction makes a big difference. I've never managed to get a good volume out of the cheap orange "rescue whistles". Better results with the good old Acme Thunderer!

I suppose if I was stuck and alone it would be late, there'd be less background noise from traffic etc., but I'm still thinking a light signal would be the best thing.
Everything helps.

Had a recent rescue (December) up just North of Fan-Brycheiniog (I think there was the picture shown of it earlier in the thread) - blowing a hoolie into our faces as we approached the approximate location, then we saw their light, then heard their whistles, I replied with three blasts back regularly of a decent loud whistle. Stopped when we got close. They never heard a thing, just saw our lamps getting closer.
 
Never heard that one before, but most modern LED flashlights have an SOS mode on them.

I still carry a whistle when I am out and and about, along with a compass.

Hadn't you, I'm surprised? Standard mountain distress signal, six flashes or whistles, three to respond when you hear it.

Is "SOS mode" the Morse, dot dot dot etc,? I've only got torches with a strobe function.
 

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