hill reps

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by stockers, Oct 16, 2008.

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  1. hiya, ive heard a lot of people on here mention hill reps as a form of training, obviously this means running up and down a hill, but has anybody got a sort of structured plan to follow? ive been running on a treadmill for about 6 months due to a bad knee, but recently started running outside, i can do about a mile in around 7 minutes at the moment, but really need to improve my stamina. anybody got any advice?

    cheers dan
  2. yup....you run up, you turn around, you run down. Possibly not a good idea thought if you're recovering from a knee injury though, as the downward part puts a lot of pressure on the knees.
  3. you could try running down before running up it may with the knee!!!!!!!!!!!
  4. Knee problem means you don't hammer the downward part, though you can beast as much as you like on the uphill part.
    Try giving it all you got on the run up and then use the cruise down to recover before the next belt up.
    Run further or faster each time, long hills are best for this. When you can't run up any more run down and go home.

    Much depends on the hills you have got to work with, steep, long, short what?
  5. Hill reps are awesome. Just take it easy going down as everyone else has said. Use mapmyrun to find out how big the hill is then take it from there.


    Then click the 9.5mb download and on page 6 on adobe reader and page 11 on the actual image (!!) are some suggested interval training times and distances for getting your PFT time down. I guess they're a good benchmark guide and something to follow at least.
  6. My knees and achilles aren't wonderful, but I was surprised how good steps reps felt recently - I've a nice set of sixty steps in three sets of twenty with short "landings" in between. Going up two at a time fast and violent almost feels like floating, and coming down hands on hips gasping is nice and smooth as well. I suspect on a step, rather than a continuous gradient, you can use your calf more coming down, but it's all quad on the way up - but anyway, it felt quite good.

    On hills the route down often doesn't need to be the route up - you can pick a shallower way down, go up on tarmac and down on grass...