Hidden KGB Weapons in UK

Slightly off thread - but I recall reading somewhere that in the event of a nuclear war, the govt planned to use the Armed Forces to seal off the escape routes out of the main cities.
Nope. Because the Armed Forces would have been busy - either driving to Germany to hold the line against Ivan the Gasman, or guarding all of the KPs that made their logistic support possible. There were no spare troops to be found, anywhere.

That kind of claim tends to come out of the more swivel-eyed tinfoil hat wearer, convinced that "The Establishment" will all have safe spaces in a bunker for themselves and their families, and utterly unwilling to drop a suspicion that the Army (obviously as the joyous fascist bootheel of the Imperialist oppression) would far rather be machine-gunning their own families' refugee convoys than defending the realm or giving the Soviets a good kicking.
 
So I think that the use of some abandoned posts as arms dumps might have been feasible.
Which is why many of the posts in Northern Ireland were filled with concrete once Op BANNER started.

Dad left the Army, and joined the ROC as a full-time officer. After the giggle that was sending a marathon-running ex-regular WO off to Cranwell for six weeks with a bunch of nurses, the lucky sod, he spent most of the years before stand-down being "that bloke who understands how to program the Plessey MSX Message Switch"[1] and eventually the DGC of the local Group.

[1] No internet, it was the 1980s. No dynamic routing algorithms, quite yet - so routing tables for digital comms were still being hand-coded.
 
Aren't they mostly on hill tops?

No.
Often on hillsides. Some on hilltops.

Basically a hole was dug and a one room concrete box dropped in. They were never intented to last particularly long and water seeps in.
They all have a hand cranked sump pump at the bottom of the access ladder and the intention was that any water ingress was pumped out reasonably regularly. Nobody has pumped them out in decades so many are now flooded to some degree.
 
Nope. Because the Armed Forces would have been busy - either driving to Germany to hold the line against Ivan the Gasman, or guarding all of the KPs that made their logistic support possible. There were no spare troops to be found, anywhere.
Not entirely true, as far as I recall several units at Warminster had no go to war role.

Conveniently close to Corsham and the Burlington bunker which would suggest they were going underground with the government in the event of instant sunshine being likely.
 

31alpha

Old-Salt
Any pictures of abandoned posts I have seen and the one near to me suggest that they would be unsuitable as cache locations. They go downhill quickly.
Sorry no pics , in fact I have not been near any Post since Stand-Down. I occasionally see one, or the remnants of The Hatch( small concrete and brick structure), on the skyline or other prominent feature when out in the country. They are easy to spot if you know what to look for.
 

BlackDyke

War Hero
Which is why many of the posts in Northern Ireland were filled with concrete once Op BANNER started.

Dad left the Army, and joined the ROC as a full-time officer. After the giggle that was sending a marathon-running ex-regular WO off to Cranwell for six weeks with a bunch of nurses, the lucky sod, he spent most of the years before stand-down being "that bloke who understands how to program the Plessey MSX Message Switch"[1] and eventually the DGC of the local Group.

[1] No internet, it was the 1980s. No dynamic routing algorithms, quite yet - so routing tables for digital comms were still being hand-coded.
I read somewere that ROC Fl/Lt equivalents were commonly mistaken for Air Commodores in shirt sleeve order because the rank stripes were blacked out unlike the similar RAF ones.
 
Sorry no pics , in fact I have not been near any Post since Stand-Down. I occasionally see one, or the remnants of The Hatch( small concrete and brick structure), on the skyline or other prominent feature when out in the country. They are easy to spot if you know what to look for.
Taken at Cuckfield in Sussex last year. Horsham 50 Post I think. They open it up about one weekend a month for four months over the summer.

Taken from the door:

20180805_103240-1238x1651.jpg


And taken from the back wall towards the door/hatch:

20180805_103211-1238x1651.jpg


Obviously this is museum/display standard and not quite how it would be operationally. I did see a post in Scotland in 1989 that had a proper hand cranked air filter on the back wall to enable it to operate without the dreaded air change but apparently these were experimental.

The post did seem to have one structural problem - the entrance shaft seems to have, ahem, contracted - but when I was there I was 16 again.
 

DaveDaffe

War Hero
These pictures bring back memories! I served at North Wales 60 post (actually in Mid Wales). Damp cold post that was and its still intact so I am told but I have never been back to visit.
 
Never mind the weapons, what about all those Spetznaz operatives inserted into British society all those years go as part of the plan to infiltrate and paralyse the country when the Cold War turned hot?

Some of them are probably sitting in old folks homes now, their stories of daring do and being Russian 'them' told in affected regional British being put down to dementia.

There was a BBC one off in the early 90's as I recall with Nigel Havers and Michael Elphick (I think) playing KGB/Spetznaz types with covers of Nigel being the playboy toff (obvs) and Elphick down to earth working class type (obvs) who wondered what to do and how to come to terms with their lot now the Cold War was over.
The strange case of Melita Norwood, of Ruislip.

 
Not entirely true, as far as I recall several units at Warminster had no go to war role.

Conveniently close to Corsham and the Burlington bunker which would suggest they were going underground with the government in the event of instant sunshine being likely.
If so, they weren't "spare troops".
 
You'd need to ask Vasili Mitrokhin.
I didn't actually come up with this plan myself. I just read about it on the internet and it interested me.
His academic colleague who exploited the archives was Chris Andrew, MI5's historian. In the official history of the Security service by Andrew, there's a bit on Spetnaz infiltration - and how they would be met. It's a fair bet that the location of caches was known as well.
 
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Not entirely true, as far as I recall several units at Warminster had no go to war role.

Conveniently close to Corsham and the Burlington bunker which would suggest they were going underground with the government in the event of instant sunshine being likely.
The war role of Demonstration Battalion was home defence. The old 5 Airborne Brigade also had a (limited) home defence role. Well, we certainly took part in some home defence exercises.
 
The war role of Demonstration Battalion was home defence. The old 5 Airborne Brigade also had a (limited) home defence role. Well, we certainly took part in some home defence exercises.
Depending on the time period the alternative seat of government was to housed a few miles north under Corsham

Word was that the Demonstration Battalion would be moved to Corsham to look after it

Certainly plenty of room down there for it

Don't know if that was actually the case but it was the duty rumour at one time
 
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That kind of claim tends to come out of the more swivel-eyed tinfoil hat wearer, convinced that "The Establishment" will all have safe spaces in a bunker for themselves and their families, and utterly unwilling to drop a suspicion that the Army (obviously as the joyous fascist bootheel of the Imperialist oppression) would far rather be machine-gunning their own families' refugee convoys than defending the realm or giving the Soviets a good kicking.
I used to work in an office block that had been originally built as offices for some of the local council guys. It had a nuclear shelter under it. Not entirely sure it'd be of any use. It might keep you safe through the initial strike, and for a couple of days afterwards. But long term it was untenable, so many of those ideas of establishment types under ground all safe are very wrong, and as I said earlier the city was goign to take a direct hit from a warhead, so after the initial strike everyone would be outside getting irradiated by fallout just like the little guys.

Lets put it this way, that location had no toilets or running water fitted to it. Just two large concrete rooms and a air filtration room.
Thinking about it, the site had a massive water tank, one that was about three times the volume that sort of sized site would need, which was located just outside the bunker's front door, albeit underground. I suspect actions on Nuclear attack, would be to lock off the inflow valve, duck into the bunker, slam both the doors and clench.
 

tiv

War Hero
Nope. Because the Armed Forces would have been busy - either driving to Germany to hold the line against Ivan the Gasman, or guarding all of the KPs that made their logistic support possible. There were no spare troops to be found, anywhere.

That kind of claim tends to come out of the more swivel-eyed tinfoil hat wearer, convinced that "The Establishment" will all have safe spaces in a bunker for themselves and their families, and utterly unwilling to drop a suspicion that the Army (obviously as the joyous fascist bootheel of the Imperialist oppression) would far rather be machine-gunning their own families' refugee convoys than defending the realm or giving the Soviets a good kicking.
A friend who was in the ROC told me that the head man at his post told him not to both turning up in event of war as he would be in the post with his family.
 

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