Herrick Trauma Care Lessons Forgotten??

I took it to be more about a system failure rather than individuals making mistakes.

The clip was of a news report which did state that experts said her injuries were not survivable.

Medical advances are common and occasionally rapid in war time, their transition to civilian use can take longer.
Only through experience do systems i prove and lessons are learned, thats why all the medical staff on Herrick were so capable.

If the system in the UK reaches such proficiency we will be in a pretty shít place.
 
I’m intrigued to know if the EOD operator will be called to the enquiry and if there will be any criticisms there.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Exactly how many paramedics and emergency doctors/nurses do you think there are in Britain and how many of them are Reservists and saw service in Afghanistan?

Is the Combat Application Tourniquet approved for civilian use? Is it approved for paediatric use?

This sort of media hype really helps nobody. RIP Saffie.

The CAT was adopted into civilian ambulance service here on the South Coast in 2011. I get the impression it varies from Health area to Health area.

During the filming of the BBC documentary 'Frontline Medicine ' in Bastion in 2011, I got talking to one of the trainers.

BBC Two - Frontline Medicine

Former green-lid CPOMA Steve **** - he had spent time attached to South Central Ambulance Service during his resettlement phase .

I'd love to give you a link to the programme - but the BBC took it off iPlayer shortly after it was screened.

Still being shown via BBC World I think.
 

VALCON

Clanker
One of the few positives to come out of Helmand was the advances in medical care for trauma injuries.

I believe huge advances were made specifically in stemming blood loss from IED injuries using quikclot powder, celox dressings, tourniquets, etc

I thought those lessons, skills & techniques had been learnt in Helmand and then shared with and implemented by the NHS via the TA / Reserve medical personnel returning from mobilisation & tours both as CMTs and in Bastion Role 3 hospital.

Now I've just seen this, and it appears that it has all been forgotten and at the very highest price you could imagine - the youngest victim of the Manchester Arena SIED attack surviving for an hour, talking to medical staff but then still bleeding to death from injuries to her legs, possibly because no one applied pressure to the wound, no one fitted a tourniquet, etc



Anyone in the know dare to respond to this?
What happened to all we learnt at so greater price in Helmand?
Was it passed on to paramedics & ER staff?
Could it really have been forgot so quickly?
Spoke to a family member of one of the Manchester Arena bombing vicitm's. Emergency services sealed off the whole of the immediate blast area and tagged it as a 'Non survivable, Kill area/zone' for an hour - None of the emergency services were allowed into that zone for an hour after the blast, leaving only improvised techniques to be used - everyone presumed dead/non survivors.
A frustrating hour to say the least.
 

Poppycock

Old-Salt
Only through experience do systems i prove and lessons are learned, thats why all the medical staff on Herrick were so capable.
All that experience & all those lessons were supposed to have been passed back to the NHS

I did recruitment in NHS hospitals for my TA Field Hospital & that was our number one pitch - learn new skills and bring them back to implement in the NHS

To have had blast victims bleed out in 2017 Manchester due to lack of tourniquet / direct pressure / blood clotting agents is inexcusable. We waged a global "War-on-Terror" whilst failing to prepare our own emergency services for the inevitable blow-back as happened at the Manchester Arena.
 
Spoke to a family member of one of the Manchester Arena bombing vicitm's. Emergency services sealed off the whole of the immediate blast area and tagged it as a 'Non survivable, Kill area/zone' for an hour - None of the emergency services were allowed into that zone for an hour after the blast, leaving only improvised techniques to be used - everyone presumed dead/non survivors.
A frustrating hour to say the least.

I’d be very surprised if that was the reason. They would triage as normal.

What may have kept them out of the immediate vicinity is the possibility of secondary devices. The area would need to be checked and cleared by an EOD operator. The EOD tram would be about an hour from the blast location.
 
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