Heroin Hell Of 120,000 Children

#1


http://www.sundaymail.co.uk/news/sc...roin-hell-of-120-000-children-78057-20157967/

The photo and article are shocking enough. This is the most shocking part:

We are not naming the man because to do so would identify the vulnerable toddler and baby girl still in his care.

But he remains the girls' legal guardian and lives with them and his wife in a house in Clackmannanshire
.
What on earth is going on? Why do clueless social workers think it is a good idea to leave children with this sort of person? If it had been a middle-class wine drinker or bottom smacker, the kids would be in care before you could say "Orkney Islands Satanic Child Abuse" courtesy of the SS (social services).

I believe there is an entrenched attitude amongst professionals that the feckess and drug-addled are "deprived" (on a par with a disability and not their fault) with the real causes of society's anguish being the middle classes - substance abusers (red wine), child abusers (the occasional reprimand rather than drug-fuelled neglect) and potential psychopaths (unproven diseases like Munchausen's by Proxy apparently endemic, as cited by so-called "experts").

Next time someone finds the kids (as they will - hopefully alive) they should probably drop them off somewhere other than Clackmannanshire Council - there are other local authorities within 5 minutes drive from anywhere in Clackmannan!

A COMATOSE heroin addict sprawls in a school doorway with a needle by his side - as his toddler daughter cuddles him in a pitiful bid to stay warm.

Just 10ft away, the man's six month-old baby daughter cries hysterically with no cover on her pram.

The shocking pictures illustrate the grim reality behind damning statistics that show 120,000 children are living with addict parents.

Children's charities last night described the images as "appalling and frightening".

And Justice Minister Kenny MacAskill said: "This shows the extent of the problem that drugs cause in our communities. When a wee toddler is discovered in circumstances like that, it is just so shocking.

"It really does highlight the tragedy and misery that drugs like heroin can bring."

The father was found by a businessman alerted by the baby's crying.

He said the toddler - dressed in pink tracksuit bottoms, pink and white trainers and a white T-shirt - was sound asleep but the baby looked distressed. The father's shirt sleeves were rolled up to reveal heavily tattooed arms. Around him lay the paraphernalia of drugs - discarded needles and a soup spoon for cooking heroin.

On the left of the picture, on the school step, a syringe and empty wrapper are clearly visible.

We are not naming the man because to do so would identify the vulnerable toddler and baby girl still in his care.

But he remains the girls' legal guardian and lives with them and his wife in a house in Clackmannanshire.

He is on a fast-track rehabilitation programme for heroin abusers and receives prescription methadone.

The 39-year-old has a long history of drug abuse and was jailed for five years in 1994 for a serious sex assault.

He claims the "drug works" were not his but admitted he had been drinking heavily with friends who were injecting heroin. On the day, he had appeared in court on another matter.

He said: "I was told my dad was going to hospital and I wanted to take the children because my father loves them.

"I went to the Spar and got a half bottle and I also had a half bottle of vodka in the house which I had had a few out of.

"Me and the older child sat on the grass then I think I crashed out. I'm sorry for what has happened."

The businessman who took the photos on his mobile phone said: "He was gone. He had been that way so long that the girl was also asleep cuddled into him and the baby in the pram was crying her lungs out.

"He was dead to the world in broad daylight with two vulnerable children in his care. There is a busy road just a few steps away.

"It beggars belief that this idiot could still be responsible for these girls. The school where he was found is a notorious shooting-up location for addicts. There are new needles appearing there all the time."

Children's charity leaders described the case as "extreme" but said similar scenes were frequent behind closed doors across Scotland.

Tom Roberts, head of public affairs at Children 1st, said: "It does paint a graphic picture of Scotland in 2007.

"It is an appalling and frightening image. Services for addicts need to identify where children may live with someone misusing substances and ensure plans are put in place to protect them.

"We know with the right support, parents can overcome their addiction and maintain relationships with their children.

"However, we also know that support services are over-stretched and not always available when needed."

Last week chief medical officer Harry Burns revealed at least 120,000 children in Scotland live in homes blighted by drug and alcohol abuse.

He warned: "Services are unable to prevent severe harm to many children."

The Aberlour charity believes the real number of exposed children could be as high as 160,000.

That is more than one in 10 children in Scotland, or three pupils in every class of 30.

Aberlour said: "Parental substance use can affect children in many ways. The stigma can lead to isolation and susceptibility to bullying.

"Children may fear the family being split up by social services and may try to protect it by becoming withdrawn socially and conceal the harm they are experiencing."

Roberts said: "Many children in these situations assume a role as carer to their parents and siblings.

"Of the 2288 children on the child protection register in Scotland in March 2006, 45 per cent of these were categorised as having been neglected.

"We remain concerned that alcohol or drug misuse has pervaded Scottish culture and that this acts as a barrier to real change.

"Helping parents to stop misusing drugs or alcohol is the best solution for children, the best solution for communities and the best solution for individuals themselves."

It is not only the children left in the street as their parents lie comatose who are at risk.

Children left in bedrooms as their parents lie unconscious through drink downstairs are in as much danger. But sometimes it can be hard to find help.

A report by Children 1st stated: "People often have to wait weeks or even months to get the help that they need.

"This is especially regrettable given that pregnancy or parenthood can often be the trigger to encourage someone to end their drug or alcohol misuse." In the Central Scotland case, both girls are still at home with their father.

This may appear to be a mistake by social services but they could also be at risk if put into public care.

The report states: "The reality of our public care system is that it fails many of our young people, with outcomes such as low educational attainment, increased risk of drug use, mental illness, homelessness and offending, and a lack of identity and self-esteem. Before we can be confident of giving Scotland's most vulnerable children a safer, happier and more secure childhood, much more needs to be done to address the failings of our public care system."

Shown the pictures, Tory justice spokesman Bill Aitken said: "What an indictment of the society in which we live. These photographs are truly heart-rending."

Labour justice spokeswoman Pauline McNeill said: "Sadly, there are cases like this and it will be shocking for people to read. We need more childcentred policies in government, we cannot tolerate this type of behaviour."

Clackmannanshire Council, who deal with the family, said: "Emergency duty social workers were involved in this case as soon as it came to light.

"Social workers from Clackmannanshire Council's Child Care Service continue to be involved to ensure the future safety of the children."
 
#2
Meanwhile....

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/femail/article.html?in_article_id=496235&in_page_id=1879

"She is, on first impressions, just like any other first-time mother. The cot and the pram are on order, she has bought more cuddly toys than she will ever need and she has even given her little girl a name – Molly.

With less than six weeks to go before the birth, the baby is kicking and it brings Fran Lyon an undeniable thrill of pleasure. At least, it does now she finally feels safe to enjoy it.

For all the innocent joys of impending motherhood have been denied Fran since social workers warned her four months ago that Molly would be taken away ten minutes after birth and placed with foster parents.

Fran, a third-year student doing a neuro-science degree at Edinburgh University, is, to everyone who knows her, a sociable, kind and intelligent woman. But to her local authority she is a danger to herself and her baby. "
 
#4
MrPVRd said:
The photo and article are shocking enough. This is the most shocking part:

We are not naming the man because to do so would identify the vulnerable toddler and baby girl still in his care.

But he remains the girls' legal guardian and lives with them and his wife in a house in Clackmannanshire
.
What on earth is going on? Why do clueless social workers think it is a good idea to leave children with this sort of person? If it had been a middle-class wine drinker or bottom smacker, the kids would be in care before you could say "Orkney Islands Satanic Child Abuse" courtesy of the SS (social services).
I can understand your anger, but it begs the question, 'What would you do with the kids?'.. My immediate reaction would be to take them and hand them into the care of Social Services. Job done, all neat and tidy, clap the addict round the ear'ole on the way out and everything is fluffy little clouds....
Then I read this from the above report... ......"The reality of our public care system is that it fails many of our young people, with outcomes such as low educational attainment, increased risk of drug use, mental illness, homelessness and offending, and a lack of identity and self-esteem. Before we can be confident of giving Scotland's most vulnerable children a safer, happier and more secure childhood, much more needs to be done to address the failings of our public care system.".....

It says something about our society, and it isn't anything nice, when the alternative to leaving kids like that, with parents like that, cannot be guaranteed to make anything better, and in actual fact might be worse.
 
#5
Chuffit said:
I can understand your anger, but it begs the question, 'What would you do with the kids?'.. My immediate reaction would be to take them and hand them into the care of Social Services. Job done, all neat and tidy, clap the addict round the ear'ole on the way out and everything is fluffy little clouds....
Then I read this from the above report... ......"The reality of our public care system is that it fails many of our young people, with outcomes such as low educational attainment, increased risk of drug use, mental illness, homelessness and offending, and a lack of identity and self-esteem. Before we can be confident of giving Scotland's most vulnerable children a safer, happier and more secure childhood, much more needs to be done to address the failings of our public care system.".....

It says something about our society, and it isn't anything nice, when the alternative to leaving kids like that, with parents like that, cannot be guaranteed to make anything better, and in actual fact might be worse.
It is even worse. Not only is a child raised by the state far more likely to do poorly in life but it costs a fortune as well. Something like £2,500/week to raise a child badly.
 
#6
Perturbed said:
Chuffit said:
I can understand your anger, but it begs the question, 'What would you do with the kids?'.. My immediate reaction would be to take them and hand them into the care of Social Services. Job done, all neat and tidy, clap the addict round the ear'ole on the way out and everything is fluffy little clouds....
Then I read this from the above report... ......"The reality of our public care system is that it fails many of our young people, with outcomes such as low educational attainment, increased risk of drug use, mental illness, homelessness and offending, and a lack of identity and self-esteem. Before we can be confident of giving Scotland's most vulnerable children a safer, happier and more secure childhood, much more needs to be done to address the failings of our public care system.".....

It says something about our society, and it isn't anything nice, when the alternative to leaving kids like that, with parents like that, cannot be guaranteed to make anything better, and in actual fact might be worse.
It is even worse. Not only is a child raised by the state far more likely to do poorly in life but it costs a fortune as well. Something like £2,500/week to raise a child badly.
It wouldn't cost a fortune is babies were adopted rather than left with junkie parents. These people do not deserve to have children - they forfeited their chance when they took drugs. There are many people who want children and for whatever reason cannot have them - let them have a chance at parenthood - from what I gther about the adoption process if they are prepared to go through it then they deserve a family - unlike the iliterate moronic chavs who get pregnant to get a council flat and their feckless waste of space boyfriends
 
#7
Fallschirmjager said:
Heroin addicts should be shot. They are useless and a drain on society. Why do we bother putting up with them?
Seconded! :x
 
#8
It could be worse the kid might have been with the MaCanns.
 
#9
Got to admitt pretty much not shocked by anything and normaly one to crack sick and snide comments but that picture and report for once has left me speechless. What utter scum could even think of doing that whilst in control of a baby. Kid should be put into foaster care ASAP and shame on the council for not doing it
 
#10
This case re-inforces the idea that Britian should adopt the same attitude to drugs as Singapore.

That is the possesion of narcotics when they exceed low quantities result in the person/s in possesion of said narcotics are deemed to be trafficers and upon conviction there is only one penalty available to the court,that is the death penalty.

There are also strict sanctions available to deal with addicts.

As a guide the following sanctions should be the only option available to the courts in Britian;

Result of a positive drugs test-loss of employment,barred from entitlement to any welfare payments,confiscation of driving licence and passport.

Conviction of smuggling ot trafficking drugs,death penalty.

The prevalance of narcotics if not checked will lead to a total breakdown of law and order in Britian.

The narco trade operates in league with human smuggling,prostitution and terrorism.

The do-gooder brigade will never let this happen,as to them the rights of druggie scum come before law-abiding members of society.
 
#11
Flipping nanny state, just cant believe this. lock him away
 
#12
Just saw the picture, read the article and the posts. It's absolutely tragic and shocking to see how young children are having to grow up in that kind of environment. Social Services don't seem to have a good track record when it comes to dealing with this type of case. Surely the children should have been removed immediately from the parents, who are clearly incapable of looking after them properly, and placed under a child protection order?

For those of you who, like me, are completely appalled by this, please could you also go to the forum entitled 'Free Heroin anyone?".

I've been trying to convince some of the people on that forum that drugs should NOT be legalised in the UK.

For some strange reason, there are people on that 'Free heroin forum' who seem to think it would be a good idea to legalise heroin and other drugs in the UK.

The image of the child and story on this should be enough to convince anyone that heroin, etc should NEVER be legalised in the UK.

I could never accept that and I hope that most decent minded people will agree with me on that one.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#13
Read the second story re: social services. I know its the Mail, but I've seen a lot of similar stories from more reputable outlets.

To be honest, I find that a hundred times more disturbing than the heroin addict story. Yes, some people are cnuts, we know this. At least they are relatively easy to identify and deal with. But there always have been and will be cnuts, we aren't going to get rid of them.

The issue with social services & family courts involves an entire State system, with all the power behind it that entails, little to no transparency, and practically no recourse to challenge their decisions. And it increasingly seems to be doing precisely the same thing as that smacked up bloke; namely, child abuse. Taking away children from their mothers or family, often with no explanation, no good reason, and no option to reverse the decision; and putting them into demonstrably poorer circumstances.

No amount of public outrage is going to change some heroin addicts taking heroin. It might be able to change a public service.
 

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