Hero pilot leaves controls to save parachutist

#5
Fallschirmjager said:
So he put the plane in auto pilot and went to pull the bloke back into the plane?

Mega.
Not sure what level of autopilot he has available to him... it would appear that since he did a dummy run and went back to re-trim etc that at best all he has is some form of stab but no holds in height / speed / heading etc... so not quite as simple... and <pedant mode on> he cut him free rather than pulling him back in <pm off>

I'm sure you might well have done as good a job or better... but many wouldn't and there was certainly potential for a shitty ending... deserved the award IMHO.
 
#6
Couple of bone questions;

I thought that loadies/JMs carried a knife on them incase the straps failed anyway?


Now Greyling is to receive a rarely awarded Royal Humane Society Bronze medal on the recommendation of the man whose life he saved.
Describing the incident, which happened in July last year, Royal Humane Society secretary Dick Wilkinson said: 'In all the years we have been making awards for bravery we have never had an incident like this one.
'It is truly amazing. If ever any-one deserved one of our awards he does. It really was extraordinary airmanship.
If it was so amazing (and with no Autopilot it probably was quite special) why not award the Silver or Gold Medal?


Having said that the pilot hasn't been watching enough films. A quick flick of the controls to Port and the aeroplane would go into a rapid side-slip to starboard allowing Maj Greyling to flip/catapult back into the cabin. Simplez.
 
#7
Flot_gear said:
I'm sure you might well have done as good a job or better... but many wouldn't and there was certainly potential for a shitty ending... deserved the award IMHO.
I wouldn't have been dumb enough to get tangled in the door. Well, not yet anyway! :)

Yep, it was a brave thing he did TBH.
 
#9
Is it normal for a Major to be a Jumpmaster? I take it 'exiting' the plane wasn't in the script.

Bet he is chuffed those on the ground noticed a man sized piece of debris preparing to start running like fcuk as a spare landing gear.
 
#11
Not particularly new news. This happened some time ago.

Major Denning is the commandant at JSPC Netheravon, he was dispatching static line students out in Bad Lippespringe and prior to him jumping he got caught on a static line that had been stowed. The pilot was fairly new and had no autopilot available. He used the aircrew knife to cut him free whilst having to keep the plane in trim. Not easy when 12 odd stone of ballast is moving from front to back!

Excellent skills by a newly valid DZ pilot.
 
#12
Fallschirmjager said:
So he put the plane in auto pilot and went to pull the bloke back into the plane?

Mega.
And where exactly is your Royal Humane Society Bronze medal?

*I have three. I'm a particularly non-aspirational walt.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#14
Brave my arrse!

More like "Jeez, if I've got this tw@t tangled up in the undercarriage when I land, I'm going to bend the aircraft AND I'll have to clean up. Best dump him now and hope nobody notices they're one short."

Still, deserves the award.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#15
Why bother? The major was a sooperdooperparatrooper so he would just have bounced a couple of times on landing then got up, dusted himself off and back to the Mess for tea n biccies 8)
 
#16
2 similar incidents spring to mind, one in France in the 60s, a female parachutist on a static line became tangled up somehow. No knives were available so the pilot had to land with her, fortunately it was a grass airfield and the woman survived with lots of scrapes and bruises and a broken bone or two. Second incident happened at Sibson in the 70s, which was my regular club at the time, unfortunately I did not witness it, it must have been spectacular. Once again a female student parachutist, the static line did not work, so madam ended up dangling in the breeze. Standard drill was to put right hand on the helmet as a signal that all was more or less well and that the parachutist could still function. The JM then cut the line and the victim could then open the reserve, in that order. The drill for an unconcious or disabled parachutist was definately James Bond stuff and involved the JM sliding down the static line to do the necessary. In this case our heroine, in an extremely blond moment, decided to open the reserve first. The Cessna 182 came to a sudden grinding halt at 3000 ft. It then descended to earth suspended beneath a 24 foot diameter reserve. Fortunatley for the woman, both JM and pilot suffered several broken bones, otherwise they would have performed the most devious sexual practices on her that you have never imagined.

Put simply a hung up parachutist can be very dramatic. Well done the pilot in the headlined case.
 
#17
Who'd have thought the Garth would end up being a bloody hero!

I served with him and he's a top guy, minding he's a Bokka though, and i can just picture him and his repetoire of expletives as he saved the bloke.

I would have loved to seen his knots and lashings on the steering column!!!
 
#18
I seem to recall the student in the Sibson case was a bloke.. (please feel free to fantasise regarding reported sexual practices)

The lucky stroke was to land on piles of sand and road building material on the peri track..

I was at Z'Hills the time when the french bloke got his jumpsuit caught in the door of the C47 and they landed it! Hooper spotted him on the telemeters and was able to warn the pilot, who did the slowest tail up landing I have ever seen...

Bloke was gibbering a bit so they took him up in the next lift and threw him out again...! The sorted him - no room for PTSD talkdown in the seventies...!
 
#19
HE117 said:
I seem to recall the student in the Sibson case was a bloke.. (please feel free to fantasise regarding reported sexual practices)

The lucky stroke was to land on piles of sand and road building material on the peri track..

I was at Z'Hills the time when the french bloke got his jumpsuit caught in the door of the C47 and they landed it! Hooper spotted him on the telemeters and was able to warn the pilot, who did the slowest tail up landing I have ever seen...

Bloke was gibbering a bit so they took him up in the next lift and threw him out again...! The sorted him - no room for PTSD talkdown in the seventies...!
There were piccies of the Sibson thing online, not so very long ago - not close enough to make out gender, however.

As for Z-hills: I was there the following year - Hooper told me the only thing the guy could say for some time afterwards was "F*ck F*ck F*ck . . . " - understandably :D

Good skilss from the pilot.

Not so sure 'bout the JM, though . . . :wink: