Here's an funny old pic from the BBC news site

Hi,

Those old MQs were attached to and of the same architecture as the barracks and were located at the intersection of SKS and Wilhelmstrasse.
The Sergeant's Mess:- as you go through the main gate of Brooke Barracks turn right past the Guard Room, down the road skirting the Square approx' 200 yards you'll find the Mess building on your left, the MQs could be seen from the entrance to the Sergeant's Mess!

Good luck.
Thanks so much for the info also read what you said about families receiving rations and having maids our maid was Ilsa I was only 2 years old when we went there but I remember so much, very happy memories too I know dad had great memories of the time in Spandau Just wished I'd asked him more when he was alive, was speaking to a policeman when we were there and he was telling us that in a few years they may be taking over the Barracks (Brooke/Wavell) for when they have extra police drafted into the area so thankfully they wont be pulling the camps down. Thanks again so when my husband and I go back there I'll know exactly where I need to look.
 
Makes sense - make yourself as small as possible in the direction of the incoming, and get up against something big which might take most of it.

My father was in a contact with the Indonesians in Borneo, when the latter called in mortars. He describes hearing the bombs coming crashing through the upper branches before going off, and trying to be very small indeed.

I've read the same about Vietnam.

His battalion of the DLI was in Berlin around the time the wall went up. There's some Youtube footage of the regiment from around the time but they're in denims, not battledress:

The BAR,British Army Review . Most unless they have a pass to the Officers mess have no idea about this magazine. Please tell me I am wrong?

About 30 years ago had a very good article about this very thing, in Borneo the RA had to re learn "Old skills about firing into heavy forest.

The BAR mentioned a New Zealand chap, served in Vietnam who described the best way to send a fire mission into heavy jungle, different from a normal fire mission in the west.
 
Hi,

Those old MQs were attached to and of the same architecture as the barracks and were located at the intersection of SKS and Wilhelmstrasse.
The Sergeant's Mess:- as you go through the main gate of Brooke Barracks turn right past the Guard Room, down the road skirting the Square approx' 200 yards you'll find the Mess building on your left, the MQs could be seen from the entrance to the Sergeant's Mess!

Good luck.
Ah, Brooke Bks main gate opposite Hesco's/site of Spandau gaol. Post Office inside the gate on the left and Guardroom to the right - main square straight ahead, Officers Mess on the road to the left. Turn right past the G/room and pass company lines; the WO's and Sgts Mess is indeed somewhere 200 yds on the left. IIRC the QMs was somewhere down that end as well.
 
Yep, can confirm the '80s. Thereafter they were confined to the first-turtle-into-space pre-exercise pyrotechnic safety demonstrations.

I think elfin safety probably put an end to these, as well.
We had war stocks of these helmets kept on the NBC decontamination centre for the SRF at RAF Shawbury as late as 1994.
 
His battalion of the DLI was in Berlin around the time the wall went up. There's some Youtube footage of the regiment from around the time but they're in denims, not battledress:
Not in that fillum they're not.

They're wearing the olive green, cotton sateen combat dress that I was issued when I joined the TA in 1973, between skule and Sandhurst.

Very well made, very baggy, very heavy, especially when wet, and since it was fully lined, with reinforced elbows knees and seat, it took forfecknever to get dry once wet.
In the ACF in the early 70s, there were cadets issued denim battledress. On the Cert A ( ? ) Part 1 or 2, we were taught, under fieldcraft, that squaddy might wear khaki BD if he expected to cross churned, brown ground or in autumn, or green denim BD in woods or in spring. I remember both types of BD jacket were available from the local Army Surplus Store
Look closely at good quality B+W photos of British troops in Normandy in July and August 1944 and you'll soon spot loads of instances where the BD is made of denim rather than wool serge.
 
View attachment 377922
It looks a bit different now!
For reference SKS is running along the bottom, and Wilhelm Str up the right. The road top left is Seeburger Str and the one top right is Seeckt Str (the last two had MSQs/OMQs for the Wavell Bn. Brooke Gd Rm was at the bottom of SKS just before the junction of Wilhelm Str though for the life of me I can't remember where Wavell Gd Rm was though I think it was at the top somewhere.
I went back in 2000 with the previous Mrs Berlin_104s and it was barely recognisable. The MSQs were housing Bosnian/Kosovan refugees and most of the camp seemed to be industrial units. A lot had changed in the eight years since I had left.

IIRC the Sgts' Mess is the very red building in the bottom right of the red outline.
 
Look closely at good quality B+W photos of British troops in Normandy in July and August 1944 and you'll soon spot loads of instances where the BD is made of denim rather than wool serge.
Denim was working dress. Serge was battle dress. Two different issues that were warn according to conditions. but mixing was frowned upon. I know, I've got both. And no, I wasn't issued. My grandfather was though.
 
Denim was working dress. Serge was battle dress. Two different issues that were warn according to conditions. but mixing was frowned upon. I know, I've got both. And no, I wasn't issued. My grandfather was though.
Good.

You'll be well placed to note the differences between the two, and spot them when you look at photos of British troops in combat in the bocage.

I imagine that running around heavy-laden in thick woollen clobber in the heat of a Normandy high summer was a bit wearing, and that the frowning upon was set aside by some COs as a result.
 
You'll be well placed to note the differences between the two, and spot them when you look at photos of British troops in combat in the bocage.
Your post has made me scratch my brain cells and I'd like to contest your comment of "loads of instances of denim."
I know it's hardly inexhaustive research, but I googled "British Army in Normandy' and came up with just the one image of denim:-

The_British_Army_in_Normandy_1944_B9528.jpg

By Laing (Sgt), No 5 Army Film & Photographic Unit - http://media.iwm.org.uk/iwm/mediaLib//47/media-47549/large.jpgThis is photograph B 9528 from the collections of the Imperial War Museums., Public Domain, File:The British Army in Normandy 1944 B9528.jpg - Wikimedia Commons


The guys in denim are obviously the Sherman crew.

My belief is that denim was very rarely used by front line infantry and any examples are of non infantry units that had the capacity to carry spare uniforms. My belief is further reinforced by the many examples of infantry in BD and shirtsleeves with webbing, having temporarily ditched their jackets in the heat.
I've had the delight (as have a few, older, members here) of having worn the lovely '37 patt and fitting in a spare pair of socks is a major engineering affair, leaving out the option of a whole spare uniform.
I'm of the opinion that the boys went in in one uniform, their BD, and stayed in it until relieved.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Not in that fillum they're not.

They're wearing the olive green, cotton sateen combat dress that I was issued when I joined the TA in 1973, between skule and Sandhurst.

Very well made, very baggy, very heavy, especially when wet, and since it was fully lined, with reinforced elbows knees and seat, it took forfecknever to get dry once wet.

I had that combat dress during a good bit of my service. Bloody heavy and very warm, but, as you say, well made. Brilliant at retaining moisture, both from external wetness and self-made moistness. Ours was worn with a KF shirt, and a tie. If one was going to be killed then best be dressed correctly.
 
Tin bit pretty well identical for para. don R and RAC, just different chin straps. They were almost as unpopular in WW2 and after as the Yankee style crash hats issued to the 8th Army with the Grant. Basic problem - how do you wear your earphones under the helmet? Useful for a wash and brush up though.
We kept a stack of "steel pots" at Warrior Base in Korea after the issue of k-pots just for this reason. They were fitted to holes in a board on a rack, backed by a rusty, formerly highly polished, sheet of steel for a mirror, quality antique luxury, just like the tents and quonset huts we sometimes lived in there for over 5 decades, until we built the mega-million super barracks that we didn't get to really live in, as we immediately turned it over to the South Koreans as we left the DMZ.
 
Your post has made me scratch my brain cells and I'd like to contest your comment of "loads of instances of denim."
I know it's hardly inexhaustive research, but I googled "British Army in Normandy' and came up with just the one image of denim:-

View attachment 378010
By Laing (Sgt), No 5 Army Film & Photographic Unit - http://media.iwm.org.uk/iwm/mediaLib//47/media-47549/large.jpgThis is photograph B 9528 from the collections of the Imperial War Museums., Public Domain, File:The British Army in Normandy 1944 B9528.jpg - Wikimedia Commons


The guys in denim are obviously the Sherman crew.

My belief is that denim was very rarely used by front line infantry and any examples are of non infantry units that had the capacity to carry spare uniforms. My belief is further reinforced by the many examples of infantry in BD and shirtsleeves with webbing, having temporarily ditched their jackets in the heat.
I've had the delight (as have a few, older, members here) of having worn the lovely '37 patt and fitting in a spare pair of socks is a major engineering affair, leaving out the option of a whole spare uniform.
I'm of the opinion that the boys went in in one uniform, their BD, and stayed in it until relieved.
The guys in 'denim' are obviously wearing their tank coveralls. And that ain't bocage. I'm no expert on the capbadges, but the terrain is reminiscent of the ground over which Op GOODWOOD was executed. I'm wondering if they might not be the crew of a turretless M4 Sherman troop carrier, with their passengers for the day awaiting their H Hour.

Thing is, the WW2 denims are very similar in design to the BD, and B+W photography doesn't immediately point up the differences in colour and texture - you have to look to the finer details, like the buttons, and the way the fabric 'hangs'.

As an aside, the cast of Dad's Army spent a lot of their time in denims, as well as BD, and I'm pretty sure the writers were conscientious about that kind of detail, accepting that budgetary reasons may have driven the uniforms of the LDV/Home Guard
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
The guys in 'denim' are obviously wearing their tank coveralls. And that ain't bocage. I'm no expert on the capbadges, but the terrain is reminiscent of the ground over which Op GOODWOOD was executed. I'm wondering if they might not be the crew of a turretless M4 Sherman troop carrier, with their passengers for the day awaiting their H Hour.

Thing is, the WW2 denims are very similar in design to the BD, and B+W photography doesn't immediately point up the differences in colour and texture - you have to look to the finer details, like the buttons, and the way the fabric 'hangs'.

As an aside, the cast of Dad's Army spent a lot of their time in denims, as well as BD, and I'm pretty sure the writers were conscientious about that kind of detail, accepting that budgetary reasons may have driven the uniforms of the LDV/Home Guard
I recently read Seelöwe Nord.


It's a what-if account of Op Sealion launched against the coast of Yorkshire. Regulars and Home Guard get muddled and find themselves fighting in mixed units, Regulars providing a stiffening backbone to the Home Guard.

SS -Totenkopf eventually get off what's left of their invasion badges and start a Blitzkrieg, pushing our boys back, iirc into Northants. On the way, a number of the heroic mixed unit are taken prisoner. The nasty piece of work Totenkopf subunit commander points out the Home Guard dressed in denins. "Zees men are not soldiers. Zey are guerillas. Take zem round ze back und shoot zem." This, a bunch of 60-70 year olds.

The heroes are appalled, and subsequently as the tide turns, escape in the confusion. Totenkopf man is in turn captured. He is handed over to other members of the Home Guard unit. The Home Guard promise to take care of him.

With a Webley after a long, painful kicking out of sight.
 
The guys in 'denim' are obviously wearing their tank coveralls.
Could be. Some looked completely different but others did look like denims. Difficult to say for sure without seeing the waistband.

As an aside, the cast of Dad's Army spent a lot of their time in denims, as well as BD, and I'm pretty sure the writers were conscientious about that kind of detail, accepting that budgetary reasons may have driven the uniforms of the LDV/Home Guard
Now here, I agree with you. The writers were very good with the details. The series follow the development of the LDV and Home Guard very faithfully, starting off with only armbands, leading onto denims, and later BD. The denims were mainly featured in the earlier episodes as it was the first uniform issued for cost/supply reasons.

I'd like to throw in another aside, if I may; the Germans captured so much denim after Dunkirk that they supplied the U-boat fleets with it.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
The Royal Green Jackets have an impressive history. Do they still exist?
Nope. They were absorbed into The Rifles, along with a couple of other regiments. By that time they had been whittled down to just 2 battalions and the youngest bn - 3rd RGJ which was The Rifle Brigade - had been cast into history. However, a surprisingly large number of former members of those battalions are still around and ever hopeful
 
The Royal Green Jackets have an impressive history. Do they still exist?
Nope. They were absorbed into The Rifles, along with a couple of other regiments. By that time they had been whittled down to just 2 battalions and the youngest bn - 3rd RGJ which was The Rifle Brigade - had been cast into history. However, a surprisingly large number of former members of those battalions are still around and ever hopeful
From memory, that amalgamation/renaming happened in 2004, or thereabouts.
 

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