Help!!!!!!

#1
First off, if this is the wrong section to post this then I apologise now! I'm new to the boards and all that!

I would like some help answering a few issues I have

1- Is the upper age limit for the Army going up as it is in the Navy? ( something to do with a pension law ruling?)

2- Do I have to declare (if and when I apply for entry) under the Rehab of offenders act that I was fined for careless driving by a Magistrates Court? My understanding of this, is that Careless driving is NOT a criminal offence and only Criminal offences have to be declared. However, some careers staff seem to think otherwise whilst some simply don't know. I'm getting so much conflicting information.

Any help would be appreciated!

Many thanks, S.A.M.
 
#2
Upper age limit has increased to 29 recently and above 30 for some specialist trades.

As for the rehab thing I can't help with that one.
 
#3
Sam ,

Topic moved here, as we do have some duty experten that frequent this part of Arrse

Regards

PTP
 
#4
You have until 32yrs, 11months to commence nurse training in the QARANC (my corps) if that's you bag. Can't speak for the other Regiments/Corps.

As for offences, why don't you phone your Army Careers Information Office and I am sure they will be happy to help.

You may get some useful info on www.army.mod.uk/careers/

Good luck.
 
#5
Speed_Air_Man said:
...2- Do I have to declare (if and when I apply for entry) under the Rehab of offenders act that I was fined for careless driving by a Magistrates Court? My understanding of this, is that Careless driving is NOT a criminal offence and only Criminal offences have to be declared. However, some careers staff seem to think otherwise whilst some simply don't know. I'm getting so much conflicting information...
Careers staff really ought to know the answer. Careless driving IS a criminal offence, although normally regarded as relatively minor ie it could happen to anybody, and I would imagine is unlikely to cause a problem for a QARANC applicant.
 
#6
When you complete your background Security Clearance forms, there is a section that requires you to declare any criminal convictions spend or in force. This even includes speeding convictions so for Careless driving, which is an offence under Road Traffic Act 1988, will have to be declared.
 
#7
If your worried about a driving offence, dont be, although you might have to declare it to the forces, as part of the security clearances, just be honest with them.

I know many squaddies who have had driving offences when they joined or even when they have been in. So you should be ok
 
#8
A minor road offence will not in anyway hurt your chances of entry to the Armed Forces, but if asked, declare it. 8)
 
#9
Sam,

The short answer to your query regarding ROA is 'No - you don't have to declare it unless you meet one of the criteria detailed below'.

No self-respecting ARRSEr would leave a seeker of truth dangling like that, so I have wandered down the corridor to our resident legal chappy from APA, and he quoth:

The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 sets a scale of rehabilitation periods for people who have been convicted of criminal offences. After completing such a period without further conviction, the individual can regard any conviction as ‘spent’ (as if it had not occurred) when applying for jobs other than those which are exempted. The purpose of the Act is to ensure that a person convicted of a criminal offence is given the opportunity to be freed from the stigma of that conviction if they have ‘gone straight’. There is no need for such a person to disclose to his employer, or prospective employer, any information about his spent conviction even if he is asked whether he has ever been convicted of an offence (Section 4(2)). Certain convictions such as a term of imprisonment of more than 30 months can never be spent.
The issue of exceptions will raise it's head, so here's a little more from the legal eagle.

The ROA 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975 sets out a list of exempted occupations for which applicants are required to declare all criminal convictions. The ROA 1974 (Exceptions) (Amendment) Order 1986, states that this exemption is valid only when the person is informed at the time that spent convictions are to be disclosed. The most recent amendment to this Order was made by the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) (Amendment) Order 2002
To put your mind at rest, examples of 'exempt' professions are NCIS, HM Customs and Excise, RSPCA, SFO, taxi driver (!), loads of medical jobs and so on. Follow the link above if you are that concerned.

Finally, let's examine the nature of 'rehabilitation'.

The following rehabilitation periods are halved for persons under 17 years of age when they were convicted.

It is immaterial for calculating a rehabilitation period whether a sentence is suspended or not.



Sentence / Becomes spent after

Imprisonment of youth custody or detention in a young offenders’ institution or corrective training for a term exceeding 6 months but not exceeding 30 months.
10 years

Imprisonment or youth custody or detention in a young offenders’ institution or corrective training for a term not exceeding 6 months.
7 years

Imprisonment of 6 months or less.
7 years

Borstal training.
7 years

Fine or other sentence (e.g. a community service order) for which no other rehabilitation period is prescribed.
5 years

Absolute discharge.
6 months

Probation order, conditional discharge or bind over; and fit person orders, supervision orders or care orders under the Children and Young Persons Acts (and their equivalents in Scotland).
1 year or until the order expires (whichever is the longer)

* Cashiering, discharge with ignominy or dismissal with disgrace from the Armed Forces.
10 years

* Simple dismissal from the Armed Forces.
7 years

* Detention by the Armed Forces.
5 years

Detention by direction of the Home Secretary: - from 6 months to 2½ years -
5 years

Detention by direction of the Home Secretary: - from 6 months or less -
3 years

Detention centre order not exceeding 6 months.
3 years

Remand home order, an approved school order, or an attendance centre order.
Period of the order plus a further year after the order expires

Hospital order under the Mental Health Acts
Period of the order plus a further 2 years after the order expires 5 years from the date of conviction, whichever is the longer
*Offences committed whilst serving in the armed forces are treated as set out marked with an asterisk.These rehabilitation periods are for specific types of military punishment, with these rehabilitation periods being halved for offenders under the age of 17 at the time of conviction.

So basically Sam, unless you got clink for your offence, or the Home Secretary took a distinct disliking to you, you're in the clear!

PS I would be very interested to receive a PM from you detailing exactly which ACIO (and who) told you to declare it, in direct contravention of the ROA.
 
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