Help with WWII 48 Royal Marine Commando book

I wonder if someone can help me. I'm publishing my Grandad's book. He was in the 48 Royal Marine Commandos in Egypt during the 2nd world war. There's one sentence I can't make sense of...

We had daily parades when the Colonel rode on, mounted on a beautiful white horse, much to everyone's amusement except the Colonel's.

... I think there's probably been a typo somewhere. Any suggestions as to what it should say would be greatly appreciated.
 
I wonder if someone can help me. I'm publishing my Grandad's book. He was in the 48 Royal Marine Commandos in Egypt during the 2nd world war. There's one sentence I can't make sense of...

We had daily parades when the Colonel rode on, mounted on a beautiful white horse, much to everyone's amusement except the Colonel's.

... I think there's probably been a typo somewhere. Any suggestions as to what it should say would be greatly appreciated.
Pang, I don't see a problem with that. Is it "the Colonel rode on"? That is actually OK. "Rode on" as in "marched on".
 
Thanks for the speedy response hackle.

To me, 'ride on' would be used when someone rode, then stopped, and then 'rode on'. The 'on' seems to indicate a continuation which kind of implies a previous cessation. Likewise with 'march on' - the 'on' would indicate that he was marching, then he stopped, then he marched on. This doesn't seem to fit in this scenario.

Is it a specific military usage? Could you give me an example of another sentence where 'ride on' is used in a similar sense.

I think the fact that I don't quite understand why a beautiful white horse would be amusing is also making me think something's been missed out. He does mention a couple of paragraphs later though, that 'we did not hide our amusement when he rode it on parade, in the middle of a desert of all places'.
 
An alternative to 'March on' as alluded-to by Hackle would be my interpretation too.

The troops would find the Colonel's mount to be amusing - something the Colonel might not share.
 
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ACAB

LE
I don't get it. The Colonel attended the daily Parade riding a Horse. It still happens nowadays in some regiments. There was bullshit in WWII as well, it didn't cease just for Hostilities.
 
I don't get it. The Colonel attended the daily Parade riding a Horse. It still happens nowadays in some regiments. There was bullshit in WWII as well, it didn't cease just for Hostilities.


True, but not so often in RM units


Posted in a break from being manipulated by three very devious cats
 
Thanks all - so what does it mean to 'march on'? Could you give me another sentence where it would be used in the same way.
 
Thanks all - so what does it mean to 'march on'? Could you give me another sentence where it would be used in the same way.

Troops would 'March on' to the parade ground, rather than amble, when forming-up for parade, drill instruction or inspection, and to 'ride on' would serve in this context.
 

ACAB

LE
Thanks all - so what does it mean to 'march on'? Could you give me another sentence where it would be used in the same way.
OK, imagine a Passing Out Parade at a Depot. The troops would all be fell in outside their accommodation in their best uniform and be nice and shiny. They would then called to attention, turned in the appropriate direction and begin to march under their NCOs. As they reached the Drill Square they would march on as an organised and disciplined body of men towards their Parade Ground position where they would halt.
 
I can't give you another example of "rode on" used in this way, but there is a parade command "March on the officers".
 
The Colonel would not have been waiting on the parade ground for the lads to march on - the lads would have been fell in and the Colonel would have rode on. To the parade ground.

It would appear that said colonel was unfond of the experience, which caused some merriment amongst the troops.

The troops thought his riding on was amusing, the Colonel didn't.

Here endeth the lesson.
 

jinxy

LE
I would suggest it means exactly what is written. You go on parade. So the Colonel, would naturally, if on a horse, ride on parade. I imagine it would be a congruous sight given the circumstances, hence the amusement.
 
I read it as the Colonel was fond of the experience and took it seriously, perhaps too seriously hence the piss taking
 
Are/were the RM established for horses or would it have been maintained at private expense?
Adjutant at my Passing Out, '80, rode a horse. We were all praying he'd fall off.
Stables still maintained at Lympstone with enlisted grooms, AFAIK.
 
Thanks again for all the help yesterday. I've got another issue for you. Does anyone know what a Strewan is? Here is the paragraph...

Goodbye to the beachhead and to my friends who remained there; to mention just three, Dick Simpson who was killed on the landing craft, poor Freddie Fox who had his head blown off when he stepped out of his jeep onto a mine, and a cheerful Strewan whose jeep had a direct hit from a mortar.
 

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