Help to ID this uniform.

#2
Looks like tropical service dress with a stable belt from service somewhere hot full of fuzzy wuzzies, possibly India?

Back when we stuck to the quite wise policy that on no account should the enemy ever have guns.
 
#3
1908 web belt, tropical service dress, what on the back of the photo ?
 
#4
Back when we stuck to the quite wise policy that on no account should the enemy ever have guns.
That has to be the best quote this year..........
 
#6
No regimental or rank badges; maybe a cadet or school?

I know they didn't have MacDonalds in those days, but he looks very small - about 4' something, judging by the width of the web belt...


The belt looks like Pattern 1908, so the photo might be pre-WW1 by a few years.
 
#8
There was quite a scandal at the time over malnutrition and the size of people joining the forces, especially for the Boer War.


Background

In 1900 there was a great deal of anxiety about the health of the people of Britain.
The government and the armed forces had been shocked by the physical health of the young men of Britain when they were trying to recruit for the Boer War (1899-1902). They had found that many of the young men were too small or under-nourished to join up. As a result of this, a 'Committee on Physical Deterioration' was set up.
The government had worked hard to deal with conditions such as cholera and passed laws to ensure everyone had access to a clean water supply, better houses and education. These efforts however did not do anything to help with people's nutrition. Approximately a quarter of the people in London did not have enough money to live on, even if they had a permanent job and spent their wages wisely.
Seebohm Rowntree carried out a survey of working class families in the city of York in 1901. He found that even if they had jobs, wages were often too low to ensure a decent standard of living. Children did not get the good diet they needed - partly because their parents were too poor and partly because parents generally did not understand what was needed for a healthy diet. Medical care cost money and parents did not call a doctor for their children unless they were desperate.
Some organisations and charities, like the Salvation Army, intervened where it was most needed by offering cheap meals for children (see Source 4). Some School Boards, notably the London School Board, began to offer cheap, or free, school dinners. Their motive was practical: hungry children cannot learn.
The Liberal government, which was elected with a huge majority in 1906, was committed to reform. The Labour Party, newly formed in 1900 had its first M.P.s and the Liberals wanted to show that they could look after working people just as well as the Labour Party.
In 1907 they ordered that medical officials had to be told of all babies born, so that midwives could check on their physical condition and give advice to mothers. In 1907 they ordered School Medical examinations to be carried out, so as to catch ill children early. The Education (Provision of Meals) Act of 1906 was part of the government's plan to ensure that British children grew up healthy.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/lesson29.htm

http://www.jstor.org/stable/25105422
 
#9
There was quite a scandal at the time over malnutrition and the size of people joining the forces, especially for the Boer War.
That was repeated in WW1 and WWII, especialy WWII as we were gearing up for total war and half the young men that got looked at were unfit to fight due to TB, Rickets, dental problems, veneral disease, polio, rheumatic fever etc etc or simply too short for service in the infantry and some corps.

Poverty diseases in short, the welfare state partly came about to provide fit young men for national service.
 
#10
Interesting background. The tunic looks odd as well I.e. the seam stitching. Carrying a stick for drill?
 
#11
Looking at that tight waist, the riding crop and bumps in the chest area I have come to the conclusion that this person was in the Womens Auxiliary Relief Service.
Did I tell you of how many times I have been through the WARS? :)
 
#12
That was repeated in WW1 and WWII, especialy WWII as we were gearing up for total war and half the young men that got looked at were unfit to fight due to TB, Rickets, dental problems, veneral disease, polio, rheumatic fever etc etc or simply too short for service in the infantry and some corps.

Poverty diseases in short, the welfare state partly came about to provide fit young men for national service.
Indeed and still crops up today, especially dental health. Do JS still get a 4th meal a day?
 
#14
WW2 sidecap.
Bizarre tunic, tropical fabric otherwise shit knows.
1908 webbing belt.
Trollies like tunic.
Swagger stick.
Vacant smirk.
I'd guess at India, 1940-ish.
 
#15
Indeed and still crops up today, especially dental health. Do JS still get a 4th meal a day?


I didn't know we had any!

Junior Para was disbanded in the early 90's. Some of the very best soldiers to serve in the Parachute Regiment & SAS went through there.

I believe the Junior Leaders Regiment suffered the same fate!
 
#16
I didn't know we had any!

Junior Para was disbanded in the early 90's. Some of the very best soldiers to serve in the Parachute Regiment & SAS went through there.

I believe the Junior Leaders Regiment suffered the same fate!
Do the soldiers at the Army Foundation College at Harrogate not fall under this category?
 
#19
The belt is part of the 1908 Pattern,webbing which replaced the Slade-Wallace webbing introduced in 1888. 1908 Pattern remained in service until the introduction of 1937 Pattern webbing. 1908 Pattern was the first webbing which could be fitted together in one piece. The tunic was worn from before WW1 until replaced in the mid to late 1930s by Battle Dress. From the Victorian era regimental "swagger sticks" were de rigueur for all ranks for walking out. I seem to recall that in Berlin in the 1980s, 1 PWO sergeants were required to carry them around barracks.
 
#20
The belt is part of the 1908 Pattern,webbing which replaced the Slade-Wallace webbing introduced in 1888. 1908 Pattern remained in service until the introduction of 1937 Pattern webbing. 1908 Pattern was the first webbing which could be fitted together in one piece. The tunic was worn from before WW1 until replaced in the mid to late 1930s by Battle Dress. From the Victorian era regimental "swagger sticks" were de rigueur for all ranks for walking out. I seem to recall that in Berlin in the 1980s, 1 PWO sergeants were required to carry them around barracks.
Not 1 PWO or not swagger sticks anyway, just the fatter ones (the word 'cane' springs to mind), like the Provo Sgt here in Brooke Bks in late 1983 or Jan '84:

CIMG1294.jpg
 

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