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help needed-operational fitness

#1
even as i type this i can only imagine the abuse i'll receive but here goes...my unit is going to begin pre deployment training in the new year. i am keen as **** to deploy with my (infantry) battalion abd do my bit but unfortunatly since recovering from injury my fitness has slipped to a sub standard and im struggling.

Even if i dont get the chance to deploy i still want to get back into the required bracket. with the TA being the beast that it is the pt sessions on tuesday nights are far from enough and seeing as i can never get a hold of our units PTI can anyone on here offer me a training plan or any good tips to get my run time back down.

I know theres a search function but im sure there is a wealth of knowledge out here that could help me get fit to deploy
 
#2
Simple training plan to improve run times = run, a lot.

Start with doing 1.5 miles three times a week, build up speed and once yiou can comfortably do that , add in 2 more runs so you are doing 1.5 miles every day. Then start adding distance so you do 3 x 1.5 miles and 2 x longer runs each week.

You will be run fit in no time.

For the press ups and sits, just work on then 3 times a week and you should see improvements pretty fast.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#3
1st, get yourself checked to make sure you are fully recovered from your injury and fit to train.

2nd. get your running kit on and go running. Mix up longer steady state runs to improve endurance and speed work. Do a bit of bodyweight work (press ups, heaves, sit ups etc) for strength work.

3rd. Easy on the mince pies and ale over Christmas.

No rocket science, snake oil, supplements or specialist equipment required.
 
#4
... and use the search function, as you know it exists. There are plenty of threads regarding improving fitness and getting fit for the army. Save us from having to re-iterate evrything.
 
#6
Cheers guys. So running without kit is the ideal way? I can tab fine just running fast can be a problem.
I did use the search function but thought I'd explain my personal circumstances to get the right answers. Much appreciated
 
#7
If you are really serious, invest in a heart rate monitor. People will tell you that this isn't necessary, and perhaps it isn't essential, but it will make a difference.

On the whole, people run too fast. This is counter-intuitive as surely runs should be done as quickly as possible? However, before you start doing faster stuff, a decent base of fitness should be built. Several long, slow runs a week is the key. This is where the HRM comes in. Programme it properly (prob around 150 bpm but everyone is different) and it will stop you from running too fast to work aerobically.

It will be frustrating at first as you will be going really slowly but you will see benefits quickly.
 
#8
When you get to the stage where you're doing longer runs, add in some speed work by after the first mile or so, put on a sprint between say 3 lampposts, ease back down for a couple of minutes, then repeat until you're a mile from home, then cool down for the last mile.

If there's any hills near you you could incorporate those, sprint up - really drive yourself hard, jog back down. Try to do 5 reps.

You could also try negative splits, if you're running a there-and-back route, aim to to the return run faster than the outward.

Also if you get used to knocking out two mins of press ups and sit ups at the start and end of each run, you'll soon be on the right track.

Best tip of all, get a training partner even if it's your missus on a bicycle, and write down a weekly plan and tick off the runs as you do them.
 
#11
When you get to the stage where you're doing longer runs, add in some speed work by after the first mile or so, put on a sprint between say 3 lampposts, ease back down for a couple of minutes, then repeat until you're a mile from home, then cool down for the last mile.

If there's any hills near you you could incorporate those, sprint up - really drive yourself hard, jog back down. Try to do 5 reps.

You could also try negative splits, if you're running a there-and-back route, aim to to the return run faster than the outward.

Also if you get used to knocking out two mins of press ups and sit ups at the start and end of each run, you'll soon be on the right track.

Best tip of all, get a training partner even if it's your missus on a bicycle, and write down a weekly plan and tick off the runs as you do them.
Fartlek training. Lamposts, hills, parked cars anything can be used as a marker.

Knackering but builds fitness pretty quick.
 
#15
Injury was nothing major had a torn hamstring and sprained ankle. Both healed now been doing some
Phys 3 times a week but seem to be getting nowhere.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#16
Step it up to 5 days a week then, and reduce your calorie intake.

Leave the weighted daysack suggestion well alone until you are lighter, fitter and absolutely sure you are fully healed. It will be the quickest route back to inury for you if you try to start your phys rehab with bergan runs.
 
#17
There's much duff, w@nk gen on threads like these.

Soldiers are NOT experts or athletes. Asking soldiers for tips on how to get fit, is like asking them how to cook a 3-course meal because they frequently use rat-packs.

So you need two things:

1. Specific goals. Arbitrary statements like 'I want to get my runtime down' do not help you. You need specific, achievable goals which you work back from. You need a 4-6 month training programme which details what you will do each day. It should be progressive and varied.

2.Expert advice. Read 'SERIOUS Training for Endurance Athletes' - aimed at Ironman Triathletes but is relevant to all training. It's assertions are based on scientific studies and facts not 'run 1.5 miles 4 times a week because that's what I did'.

As The Duke says, you don't need to go crazy with bergen runs, as injury prevention is another key part of any training programme (read the book!).

Where do you live? What was your injury? What was are your goals e.g. 1.5 mile run time/ CFT etc.? What was your 1.5 mile run time before your injury? What is your 1.5 mile run time now you are injured?

Best of luck.

P.S I Do appreciate the irony of me telling you that soldiers are not the bastion of advice on all things fitness at the same time as giving you advice. Which is why I will reiterate - read the book. Those guys are the experts, not me or anyone else on this thread.
 

Schaden

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
Most of the time in the infantry you spend walking carrying silly amounts of stuff on your back - so go and do some agressive camping on the weekends and a few 6 hour hikes with a bfo ruck - and...run a lot.
 

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