Help identifying a multi tool in a BCB kit.

HE117

LE
My Leatherman.. of many years use and abuse..

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Original and best and still going strong!

You were not supposed to use the det crimps on L1 dets, but they were OK as long as you were careful!
 
Try cutting hard dry biltong with a non lockable thin bladed folder. The antics can be hair raising.
 

Slime

LE
Try cutting hard dry biltong with a non lockable thin bladed folder. The antics can be hair raising.
I use knives, or other bladed tools every day :)
Something as easy to cut as biltong wouldn't enter my mind as being difficult.
 
So do I. I doubt Joe Average is up to speed on using sharp blades to the extent he's safe with non locking folders.

I'm quite capable using them, but still don't trust them. They feel flimsy and unhandy. The lock is a safety feature, not a weaponising add on.
 
So do I. I doubt Joe Average is up to speed on using sharp blades to the extent he's safe with non locking folders.

I'm quite capable using them, but still don't trust them. They feel flimsy and unhandy. The lock is a safety feature, not a weaponising add on.
I've never understood why having a locking capability on sub 3 inch bladed knife, instantly turns it into a death machine. It seems a very sensible safety feature.
 
For those who know what they're doing, a sub 3" blade is enough to puncture the aorta if you know how to approach things, locking or not.

Fortunately, your average street thug prefers fixed blade 10" kitchen knives, albeit having little idea how to use them.
 

Slime

LE
So do I. I doubt Joe Average is up to speed on using sharp blades to the extent he's safe with non locking folders.

I'm quite capable using them, but still don't trust them. They feel flimsy and unhandy. The lock is a safety feature, not a weaponising add on.
I get where you are coming from :)

Its just that ‘normal’ for me would be:
Using chainsaws.
angle grinders, and where the material cut would be more dangerous than a folding knife blade.
hand chisels, again, something like black walnut makes biltong look as soft as cheese.
Hand planes and planers.
table saws and skilsaws.
jigsaws
craft knives for cutting carpets or roof coverings.
carving wood with knives and gauges.

etc etc. With the above in mind, using a penknife doesn’t enter as dangerous :)
 

Slime

LE
For those who know what they're doing, a sub 3" blade is enough to puncture the aorta if you know how to approach things, locking or not.

Fortunately, your average street thug prefers fixed blade 10" kitchen knives, albeit having little idea how to use them.
if the U.K. media are to be believed our thugs must be very strong indeed.
I regularly hear that a victim has been ‘stabbed‘ with a machete :)

Ill be buggered if I could manage to sink my issue tree beater into anyone!
Slash yes, but stab...........I’ll give that a miss :)
 

Slime

LE
I've never understood why having a locking capability on sub 3 inch bladed knife, instantly turns it into a death machine. It seems a very sensible safety feature.
It is all a bit weird really :)
I used to have a lovely little lock knife with a 35mm blade. There is no logic in thinking that a tiny lock blade more dangerous than say a 70mm fixed blade.

What I do agree with is the clamp down on double edged knives. There really can’t be any lawful reason to carry a double edged knife in the UK.
 
I get where you are coming from :)

Its just that ‘normal’ for me would be:
Using chainsaws.
angle grinders, and where the material cut would be more dangerous than a folding knife blade.
hand chisels, again, something like black walnut makes biltong look as soft as cheese.
Hand planes and planers.
table saws and skilsaws.
jigsaws
craft knives for cutting carpets or roof coverings.
carving wood with knives and gauges.

etc etc. With the above in mind, using a penknife doesn’t enter as dangerous :)
Except that you're not trying to use a non locking blade to cut black walnut, with the accompanying twisting and other antics. That would put a slightly different perspective on things.
 

Slime

LE
Except that you're not trying to use a non locking blade to cut black walnut, with the accompanying twisting and other antics. That would put a slightly different perspective on things.
Yes, using the chisel is far more dangerous*. :)
Like I said, I get the point you are making, some people aren’t to be trusted with knives.

* I can only comment from five decades of using non locking blade knives or sharp tools as a comparison of exactly what you mention. Your experience may differ.
 
Talking about dangers of cutting youreself,
There is a Scandinavian knife type which has no guard between the blade and handle. It is always used to cut on the pull stroke, and the handle is shaped to help this.
 
Those nice RAFP like to confiscate blades…for some reason if it looks shiny, its too dangerous to own utilise possess when attached to webbing secure inside a bergen….
 
Yes, using the chisel is far more dangerous*. :)
Like I said, I get the point you are making, some people aren’t to be trusted with knives.

* I can only comment from five decades of using non locking blade knives or sharp tools as a comparison of exactly what you mention. Your experience may differ.
Not much chance of a chisel closing on your fingers though.
 

Slime

LE
Not much chance of a chisel closing on your fingers though.
How often do you use chisels?

You obviously want to labour the point.
I’m sure you are familiar with that awkward occasion when you have no choice but to be using a mallet to hammer a chisel towards yourself, and there might only be a small section of wood between your heart/lungs and that razor sharp chisel you are hammering towards yourself..............and you think ‘thank god I’m not using a knife that I have unfolded, with a blade that I know the ONLY direction it can fold in’ ;)

As per an earlier comment, your experiences might be different to mine.
With Western armies having issued folding non locking knives by the multi million to troops for at least 80 years I’m willing to accept they can’t be too dangerous :)
 
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And with pressure on it, even though it can only fold in one direction, it may still twist. This is not a comparison between non locking knives and chisels. A ten inch kitchen knife and a three inch folder are not the same, but I find the ten inch kitchen knife safer than the folder in a working environment. You wouldn't use a knife to chisel anything.

The point is, non locking folders are a hazard to the user, probably less so than a chisel as you're belabouring the point, but still more hazardous than a fixed blade or lockable folder.

Once again - It's a fucking safety feature, not an add on to make it easier for cunts to stab each other.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Yes it does. If I can’t source one it’s no great shakes, but the person who wants it asked for it to complete a period survival kit.
He may find one of these useful - great for fire lighting
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HE117

LE
Guys,

The locking knife thing has nothing to do with common sense or logic.. It is an example of Judical/Police d1ck swinging and nothing more...

The sequence of events in simple terms is:

1. The Police wanted an act that would make it easy for them to nick folk with knives. They have always been able to charge people for being aggressive with stuff, including knives, but this requires that they have to make a case, produce evidence etc, which is a bit of a PITA. They would much rather have laws which define illegal possession. This is easy to convict.. possess nasty object.. nicked! The problem is however that there are a load of inconvenient, but perfectly legitimate reasons for possessing bladed objects! ...so we end up with a bodged set of laws..

2. In the passage of these laws through Parliament, the initial aim from the instigators (HO/Police) was to make simple possession of a knife illegal. This is impossible.. so it was changed to make possession of a knife without a "good reason", however it was pointed out that it is "common practice" to carry a small folding knife, and parliament agreed that this was to continue to be allowed, provided the blade was less than 3". There has never been anything in UK law about locking blades..!

3. In 1990 the Police charged an individual who has an under 3" locking blade knife in his glove compartment.. he claimed it fell under the pocket knife exemption as it was "a folding knife with a blade under 3", however the Judge decided otherwise, a decision which was upheld in both crown (Harris v DPP 1992) subsequently confirmed by the Court of Appeal (R v Deegan 1998).

If you care to read the cases cited above, you will see that it was IMHO a stitch up.. the decision was made on a particularly illogical interpretation of the law, however that is where we are.. and unless parliament can be persuaded to open the whole can of worms again and change the law, this is where it will stay..

I am sure your confidence in the Police and Judicial system will have been boosted by these facts....



...or not?
 

Slime

LE
And with pressure on it, even though it can only fold in one direction, it may still twist. This is not a comparison between non locking knives and chisels. A ten inch kitchen knife and a three inch folder are not the same, but I find the ten inch kitchen knife safer than the folder in a working environment. You wouldn't use a knife to chisel anything.

The point is, non locking folders are a hazard to the user, probably less so than a chisel as you're belabouring the point, but still more hazardous than a fixed blade or lockable folder.

Once again - It's a fucking safety feature, not an add on to make it easier for cunts to stab each other.
Let’s cut to the chase.
If anyone is too thick to use a non locking folder safely ........don’t use one.
I’m certainly not exceptional in any way and have managed to use them very safely for half a century.
 

Slime

LE
He may find one of these useful - great for fire lighting
View attachment 463839
I’m sorry, you can’t have a funny for that (in a period survival kit), or an informative as there is already a tampon in the kit as standard issue.........

What is a bit random is that the printed labels on the kits point out that the tampon is not for personal use, or that the included condoms are not for personal use, but rarely state it for both :)
 

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