Help identifying a multi tool in a BCB kit.

Aha, Toolclip - originally made by SOG in Seki, Japan. No longer made, I had a copy and it was ok.
Believe it's actually a copy of an earlier tool dating back to maybe WW2.
I 've never used one but the standard Army Jacknife always looked really practical.
Good blade, can opener, marlin spike (actually for horses hooves maintenance of), lanyard loop.
 

Slime

LE
I 've never used one but the standard Army Jacknife always looked really practical.
Good blade, can opener, marlin spike (actually for horses hooves maintenance of), lanyard loop.
Ive never really bought the idea of using a sailing tool for knots on horses hooves.

The marlin spike is too long and too pointed for horses hooves. Having grown up owning horses, and using tools to clean out their hooves the tools bear no relation whatsoever to a marlin spike.
 
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Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I got a Stainless unbranded one FOC many years back, when I assisted the police by incapacitating a house burglar
it was removed from his person, and given to me afterwards
I keep it in my motorcycle tank bag
 

Slime

LE
Here is a cheap and cheerful pick, note that it doesn’t have a pointed tip.
Points are rubbish for scraping, and could cause injury.

10BCFACF-298D-4DE7-B103-D2914FEF824D.jpeg
 

Slime

LE
As an add on, it’s worth noting that sailing knives have marlin spikes, and I‘m sure that ‘heave ho me hearties and splice the mainbrace’ is more apt than ‘heave ho me hearties, and shoe the sea horses’ :)
 
Ive never really bought the idea of using a sailing tool for knots on horses hooves.

The marlin spike is too long and too pointed for horses hooves. Having grown up owning horses, and using tools to clean out their hooves to tools bear no relation whatsoever to a marlin spike.
Hmmm, it was an ex booty in my Sqn who had one but sure it was an issue British Army one.
See any WW1 era British mounted unit and the white (string) lanyard around right shoulder is for said knife.

Q probably is - can you marl with a hoofy doofer?
 

Slime

LE
Hmmm, it was an ex booty in my Sqn who had one but sure it was an issue British Army one.
See any WW1 era British mounted unit and the white (string) lanyard around right shoulder is for said knife.

Q probably is - can you marl with a hoofy doofer?
No, as it wouldn’t have a point so wouldn’t fit into a rope‘s strands, it also wouldn’t be long enough for many ropes.
 
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Slime

LE
This is a Belgian army jack knife. It’s a 1950 vintage, these were identical to the British army issue except the letters ABL on the main blade, which denotes Belgian army.

Just imagine how ‘happy’ your average horse would be to have that sharp point stuck into the relatively soft frog in the centre of its hoof!

610558CE-E9C3-43B4-9570-66E100377EBF.jpeg
 
I 've never used one but the standard Army Jacknife always looked really practical.
Good blade, can opener, marlin spike (actually for horses hooves maintenance of), lanyard loop.
I still carry one - a Singaporean made copy of the later all stainless job. Cuts, opens beer bottles and tin cans. All yer need.
 
This is a Belgian army jack knife. It’s a 1950 vintage, these were identical to the British army issue except the letters ABL on the main blade, which denotes Belgian army.

Just imagine how ‘happy’ your average horse would be to have that sharp point stuck into the relatively soft frog in the centre of its hoof!

View attachment 463580
The original clasp knife of ww1 was huge with a big eff off spearpoint blade and a can opener that caused people to cut themselves. This led to a US patented safety version as seen on the modern clasp knife. We of course wouldn't pay for the patent so used the fork based deign seen until the patent expired.
The marlinspike was used splicing ropes and forcing apart knots in the days when we taught such things to the common soldiery.
 

Slime

LE
The original clasp knife of ww1 was huge with a big eff off spearpoint blade and a can opener that caused people to cut themselves. This led to a US patented safety version as seen on the modern clasp knife. We of course wouldn't pay for the patent so used the fork based deign seen until the patent expired.
The marlinspike was used splicing ropes together, in the days when we taught such things to the common soldiery.
Oddly enough I’m sure I said exactly that about ropes already :)
 
Oddly enough I’m sure I said exactly that about ropes already :)
You did. However the missus will interrupt me every five minutes and things move on by the time I get back
 

Slime

LE
You did. However the missus will interrupt me every five minutes and things move on by the time I get back
You did however raise an interesting point about tin openers. With so many only knowing newer designs it can really take some time for people to figure out the older styles.

I’ve just taken this pic to show differences.

AB29684A-A81C-4FBF-9974-7664D541CA06.jpeg
 
This is a Belgian army jack knife. It’s a 1950 vintage, these were identical to the British army issue except the letters ABL on the main blade, which denotes Belgian army.

Just imagine how ‘happy’ your average horse would be to have that sharp point stuck into the relatively soft frog in the centre of its hoof!

View attachment 463580
Mine virtually as issued .... manufactured in 1952 ... " Oil All Joints " ...

Clasp Knife WL.JPG
 
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Slime

LE
Mine as issued .... manufactured in 1952 ... " Oil All Joints " ...

View attachment 463591
The metal used on these is very durable.
Your ‘52 model and my ‘68 model look as good as new.

The older style knives tarnish very quickly. The one in my pic was ‘new old stock’ but had tarnished massively despite never having been issued.
 
You did however raise an interesting point about tin openers. With so many only knowing newer designs it can really take some time for people to figure out the older styles.

I’ve just taken this pic to show differences.

View attachment 463589
Both types still being made - not sure about the crocodile can opener, they might both have the newer version.
 
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