Help for some Ex-Pats in the U.S.

LD17

Old-Salt
#1
I checked with the Mod (Bad CO)ahead of time and it was either here or the U.S. thread, please feel free to move it there if need be. I opted for here because of the traffic......

I normally don't do this but I have known Nicky and her husband Sean for over 20 years........after my first trip to England I couldn't bring myself to drink American tea anymore (Sean refers to it as "Lipton swill " ?) The other cops in my Precinct told me to go see Nicky. They have been true friends, not only to the NYPD (and any & all visiting British Coppers) but also to both U.S. and U.K. service members. Again, as friends of mine and the only place to get a decent cuppa this side of the Pond, if anyone would like to help I know that they would appreciate it.

their webpage:
https://www.teaandsympathy.com/

Tea & Sympathy creates GoFundMe campaign so it's not 'the next one' to close
Afraid her businesses will be priced out of West Village, the owner is seeking assistance.

Tea & Sympathy on Greenwich Avenue, which is facing financial straits, has a GoFundMe campaign to help with real estate tax, rent and loan repayments. Photo Credit: Corey Sipkin
By Shaye Weavershaye.weaver@amny.comNovember 14, 2018 5:52 PM

Beloved West Village tea shop Tea & Sympathy, its British grocery store, and fish and chips shop, A Salt and Battery, are in trouble.
Nicky Perry, the shops' English-born owner, created a GoFundMe page on Wednesday morning in a desperate plea to keep her businesses open. With a goal set at $100,000, Perry would use the money to lower loan repayments, as well as pay vendors, real estate taxes and rents for all three of her businesses at 108, 110 and 112 Greenwich Ave.
As of early evening Wednesday, the fundraiser had collected nearly $2,300.
Tea & Sympathy, which serves tea, scones and other British favorites, has been a West Village staple since 1990. Photo Credit: Corey Sipkin
Perry, who opened Tea & Sympathy in 1990 and A Salt and Battery in 1999, said she's afraid her shops will be the next in her neighborhood to be shuttered."There's an empty store on every single damn block," she told amNewYork. "It's mad. Since I opened the shop, I'm paying 10 times the rent and 1,000 times the real estate taxes. It's killing all of us. Tortilla Flats is gone. If I don't do something, I'm going to be the next one. Will we become a high-end clothing store no one is going to buy anything from?"
The monthly fees the three businesses need for loans, vendors, real estate taxes and rent total $28,000 – and don't include other important costs of running the businesses, such as payroll, she said. The landlord for the tea shop at 108 Greenwich Ave., Sky Management, declined a request for comment and the landlord for the fish and chips and retail shop at 110-112 Greenwich Ave., Gatsby Realty, did not return a call for comment.

Tea & Sympathy, with a menu featuring favorites such as sticky toffee pudding and treacle pudding, and traditional English fare (baked beans on toast, Welsh rarebit with fresh tomato) hasn't done any less business compared with 10 years ago, but operating costs are so high, Perry said, that she can't catch up. And if things keep going the way they are, Tea & Sympathy would be forced to raise its prices and eventually close.
"People are not going to pay $45 for a pot of tea and scones," she said. "Selling $10 fish and chips and $7 scones — there's no way."
Not only that, but other businesses seem to be chipping away at her earnings. Every time someone uses a credit card, the card companies take 4 percent; Seamless and Postmates take about 12.5 percent from the profit of a single sale, she said. "People are not going to pay $45 for a pot of tea and scones," Nicky Perry said. NerdWallet says it's common for credit card companies to charge about 1 to 3 percent of the transaction. A 2014 Quartz dive into GrubHub/Seamless business filings found that the average commission charged to restaurants was 13.5 percent.
"Here, all the restaurants have to pay payroll, their bills, real estate taxes and rent, but everybody else is making the money," Perry said. "I'm not a wealthy person and I don't care about being wealthy and I'm not interested in jewelry and Chanel suits. I just want to pay my bills and give my fantastic workers a little bit extra for Christmas this year."She couldn't give her staff a bonus last year for the first time, she said. She turned to GoFundMe because she is afraid her landlords won't renew her lease at the end of the year because of all she owes.
"This morning, I was thinking, 'How am I going to do this? I'm never, ever going to make enough money,' " she said. "It made me cry."

So I thought let me try to enlist ARRSE to save the day !!!

LD17
 
#2
I checked with the Mod (Bad CO)ahead of time and it was either here or the U.S. thread, please feel free to move it there if need be. I opted for here because of the traffic......

I normally don't do this but I have known Nicky and her husband Sean for over 20 years........after my first trip to England I couldn't bring myself to drink American tea anymore (Sean refers to it as "Lipton swill " ?) The other cops in my Precinct told me to go see Nicky. They have been true friends, not only to the NYPD (and any & all visiting British Coppers) but also to both U.S. and U.K. service members. Again, as friends of mine and the only place to get a decent cuppa this side of the Pond, if anyone would like to help I know that they would appreciate it.

their webpage:
https://www.teaandsympathy.com/

Tea & Sympathy creates GoFundMe campaign so it's not 'the next one' to close
Afraid her businesses will be priced out of West Village, the owner is seeking assistance.

Tea & Sympathy on Greenwich Avenue, which is facing financial straits, has a GoFundMe campaign to help with real estate tax, rent and loan repayments. Photo Credit: Corey Sipkin
By Shaye Weavershaye.weaver@amny.comNovember 14, 2018 5:52 PM

Beloved West Village tea shop Tea & Sympathy, its British grocery store, and fish and chips shop, A Salt and Battery, are in trouble.
Nicky Perry, the shops' English-born owner, created a GoFundMe page on Wednesday morning in a desperate plea to keep her businesses open. With a goal set at $100,000, Perry would use the money to lower loan repayments, as well as pay vendors, real estate taxes and rents for all three of her businesses at 108, 110 and 112 Greenwich Ave.
As of early evening Wednesday, the fundraiser had collected nearly $2,300.
Tea & Sympathy, which serves tea, scones and other British favorites, has been a West Village staple since 1990. Photo Credit: Corey Sipkin
Perry, who opened Tea & Sympathy in 1990 and A Salt and Battery in 1999, said she's afraid her shops will be the next in her neighborhood to be shuttered."There's an empty store on every single damn block," she told amNewYork. "It's mad. Since I opened the shop, I'm paying 10 times the rent and 1,000 times the real estate taxes. It's killing all of us. Tortilla Flats is gone. If I don't do something, I'm going to be the next one. Will we become a high-end clothing store no one is going to buy anything from?"
The monthly fees the three businesses need for loans, vendors, real estate taxes and rent total $28,000 – and don't include other important costs of running the businesses, such as payroll, she said. The landlord for the tea shop at 108 Greenwich Ave., Sky Management, declined a request for comment and the landlord for the fish and chips and retail shop at 110-112 Greenwich Ave., Gatsby Realty, did not return a call for comment.

Tea & Sympathy, with a menu featuring favorites such as sticky toffee pudding and treacle pudding, and traditional English fare (baked beans on toast, Welsh rarebit with fresh tomato) hasn't done any less business compared with 10 years ago, but operating costs are so high, Perry said, that she can't catch up. And if things keep going the way they are, Tea & Sympathy would be forced to raise its prices and eventually close.
"People are not going to pay $45 for a pot of tea and scones," she said. "Selling $10 fish and chips and $7 scones — there's no way."
Not only that, but other businesses seem to be chipping away at her earnings. Every time someone uses a credit card, the card companies take 4 percent; Seamless and Postmates take about 12.5 percent from the profit of a single sale, she said. "People are not going to pay $45 for a pot of tea and scones," Nicky Perry said. NerdWallet says it's common for credit card companies to charge about 1 to 3 percent of the transaction. A 2014 Quartz dive into GrubHub/Seamless business filings found that the average commission charged to restaurants was 13.5 percent.
"Here, all the restaurants have to pay payroll, their bills, real estate taxes and rent, but everybody else is making the money," Perry said. "I'm not a wealthy person and I don't care about being wealthy and I'm not interested in jewelry and Chanel suits. I just want to pay my bills and give my fantastic workers a little bit extra for Christmas this year."She couldn't give her staff a bonus last year for the first time, she said. She turned to GoFundMe because she is afraid her landlords won't renew her lease at the end of the year because of all she owes.
"This morning, I was thinking, 'How am I going to do this? I'm never, ever going to make enough money,' " she said. "It made me cry."

So I thought let me try to enlist ARRSE to save the day !!!

LD17
Tough, that is business squire.
 
#7
Can you tell me how the $100000 is going to save the business?
They are not making enough money to sustain the business as it's run now, so if they get the $100000, when
that's gone they still won't be making enough money.
It will be just kicking the can down the road might as well shut shop now or at least downsize the
business
 
#9
Can you tell me how the $100000 is going to save the business?
They are not making enough money to sustain the business as it's run now, so if they get the $100000, when
that's gone they still won't be making enough money.
It will be just kicking the can down the road might as well shut shop now or at least downsize the
business
Exactly, I have no doubt that the OPs motives are good, but to expect the public to donate money to a business to enable it to stay in business is a bit rich, even if he enjoyed their cups of tea and they donated money to a copper charity.
 
#11
Can you tell me how the $100000 is going to save the business?
They are not making enough money to sustain the business as it's run now, so if they get the $100000, when
that's gone they still won't be making enough money.
It will be just kicking the can down the road might as well shut shop now or at least downsize the
business
It’s been on several news outlets in NY...... I suspect that the negative publicity may persuade the landlords to work something out......but from the GFM page
“These funds will be used to help lower our loan repayments, pay our vendors, pay our real estate taxes, assist in our rent which for our three businesses is a whopping $28,000 per month plus real estate taxes which as landlords refinance the building increase yearly.”

As an aside NYC, especially now, is a horrible place for leasees...........landlords charge exorbitant rents (well above profit making) and before I moved a lot of the high end clothing stores were paying way over top dollar to just open store fronts in the Village........they would put up with losing money on the store, they just wanted to say they had a storefront there.

Part of former Mayor Bloomberg’s “master plan” (someone I knew worked in his office) was to turn lower Manhattan into a sort of Las Vegas strip.......no one to really live there just a place for tourists to come.
 
#12
You can't run a business on charity, as @anglo observed it is only putting off the inevitable.

They should look at which business is the most successful and offers the opportunity of making a living after all outgoings are covered - then close the other two down.

My thinking is that if after 28 years in business they still have loans there is something not right in their business model, or approach. I remember Gordon Ramsey saying that something like 92% of food /beverage businesses close in the first year so they have done well up to now. A dozen people popping in for a cuppa everyday does not a business make. If I was on shark tank I'd have to pass - 28 years and loans don't do it for me.

Do they fly over to use the NHS?
You can't, realistically, not for general up keep. You'd have to fly over to visit a GP to get a referral, then fly over again for the referred consultants visit, then fly back again for any treatment

Going private in Costa Rica for medical and dental, or doing what I did getting my diagnosis in the US and then going to Germany and paying for treatment are both still around a tenth the cost of the US.
 
#13
I appreciate all the questions and pitfalls and I posted out of friendship to them, I don’t expect anyone to be laying down money but if I can get a couple of people who may have stopped in who are on ARRSE I feel like I helped out a bit. (I know they hosted a couple of Booties in the past and the band of the Scots Guards when they were in NYC)
 
#14
It’s been on several news outlets in NY...... I suspect that the negative publicity may persuade the landlords to work something out......but from the GFM page
“These funds will be used to help lower our loan repayments, pay our vendors, pay our real estate taxes, assist in our rent which for our three businesses is a whopping $28,000 per month plus real estate taxes which as landlords refinance the building increase yearly.”

As an aside NYC, especially now, is a horrible place for leasees...........landlords charge exorbitant rents (well above profit making) and before I moved a lot of the high end clothing stores were paying way over top dollar to just open store fronts in the Village........they would put up with losing money on the store, they just wanted to say they had a storefront there.

Part of former Mayor Bloomberg’s “master plan” (someone I knew worked in his office) was to turn lower Manhattan into a sort of Las Vegas strip.......no one to really live there just a place for tourists to come.
"“These funds will be used to help lower our loan repayments, pay our vendors, pay our real estate taxes, assist in our rent which for our three businesses is a whopping $28,000 per month plus real estate taxes which as landlords refinance the building increase yearly.”

Apart from the loan, you will still have to fund the rest of that lot when the $100000 has gone
If you are not making enough now to “ pay our vendors, pay our real estate taxes, our rent which for our three businesses is a whopping $28,000 per month plus real estate taxes.”
you will go under
 
#15
If I "Go fund me" to take the kids to Disneylandworld will this also be supported as i am poorish?
 
#17
I spent several weeks in NYC a decade or two ago, and really liked the "vibe" of SoHo. (Spending some of that time in a [genuine] french model's underwear-strewn apartment may have influenced my opinion, though...).

But... I don't think that throwing money at the problem is the answer.

</serious hat> Do we have an ARRSE equivalent of the A Team that could be deployed?
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
This self same problem is occurring here in the UK, landlords sell up when made fantastic offers by larger companies, who then raise the rent to cover the buyouts ( they never use their own money)
business close down to be replaced by shitty high end high price tat sellers
Some old family friends ran a small Italian Cafe, always busy, always had the Italian expat community in, and popular with the locals ( my mother seemed to live there), the landlady passed away, eldest son took over and simply views it as a cash cow, also expects the tenants to pay for all repairs and updating ??
the rent went up by 4 times
they had to close a long running business
a few months later another small cafe takes over
they close in a few weeks !
Local to me a family has raised the rents on their small commercial properties, after doing sod all maintenance or proper repairs ( everything done by a bloke like O reilly in fawlty towers)
the family have many large houses, a fleet of high end German motor cars properties overseas and a moody yacht, plus a nice art collection. kid sin private schools and 8 holidays a year
and they complain about how hard it is to run a business and maintain their properties ????
 

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