Hellenic Armed Forces

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Robbo_72, Feb 28, 2012.

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  1. Yes, but they worry more about a quite large near-east nation.....
     
    • Like Like x 2

  2. Not just worry,paranoid!
     
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  3. I understand that the Swiss had contacted the greeks to see if they were ready to sell some of their fixed wing aircrafts (in place of buying the Grippen), the Greeks apparently got ticked off by the suggestion to sell out their best aircraft with Turkey looming next door waiting to attack (if only)... While no details were released, the only aircrafts of interest to the Swiss would have been the F16, but have you seen the amount of aircraft, UNBELIEVABLE:


    156 x F16 Falcons
    39 x Mirage 2000
    57 x F4's
    51 x LTV A-7 Corsair II

    Total of 308 combat aircraft! Never mind the passing brown envelopes during the procurement process, imagine just the fuel- and repair bill for that feet!
     



  4. [​IMG]

    Greece's finest


    [​IMG]

    Turkey's finest
     
  5. It does sound impressive until you realise what the Turks have or are about to have

    240 odd F-16s
    50 F-4s upgraded by Israel (the arms trade to irony too!)
    Soon 100 F-35s

    Add to the above they conduct the most extensive mock air combat training with NATO outside of Red Flag twice a year called Anatolian Eagle and they will have 4 of the latest AWACS and a host of KC-135 tankers to keep all of the above constantly in the air, then the Greeks suddenly do not look so well armed....
     
  6. Wordsmith

    Wordsmith LE Book Reviewer

    Murphy's laws of war: the side with the fanciest uniforms loses.

    Will this go with the form book?

    Wordsmith
     
  7. Turkish graffiti written, rather large, in stones on a Cypriot hillside. "Last time you ran. Next time you swim".
     
  8. Andy_S

    Andy_S LE Book Reviewer

    SNIP
    Under austerity you would think the inventory numbers would be lower and conscription would be unaffordable?
    SNIP

    Conscription is a lot cheaper than professionalism. Last time I looked, the UK had the world's third largest defense budget. We have an army of - what? 100,000 chaps?

    I live in South Korea. I don't think they are even top 10 in defense spending, but they have an army of - what? 650,000 chaps?

    The secret? Pay your inducted grunts 10 quid a month.

    Speaking of Korea: Glad to see the Turks shouldering Garands and wearing greatcoats...this is the kit they wore in 1950.

    When the Chinese stormed into North Korea and shattered the UN Command, 27th Commonwealth Brigade was the only formation holding the line; the Middlesex Regt deployed to hold open the lower pass at Kunu-ri while the Chinese were massacring the US 2nd Infantry Division six miles up the valley: That was the worst disaster to befall US Army in modern times. Meanwhile, grim little bands of Turks - whose brigade had been decimated to the northeast - came through the British lines.

    The Middlesex Regiment blokes - who were the only UN troops advancing toward the enemy and who were, themselves, soon being overrun - still remember those Turks. They had lost a quarter of their strength in their first, traumatic action in Korea, but as men, they were undefeated: All had bayonets fixed to their rifles, and many of them were carrying their dead strapped across their backs.

    Tough fellow, Mehmet.
     
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  9. Have you mentioned who pays the conscripts? Their true cost surely is a hell lot more than 10 quid while serving, assuming they remain employed. Conscripts usually remain on their employer's payroll during service (though this may differ from country to country) and are usually reimbursed to a degree by the government. IF that were the case, the money simply comes out of a different coffer, the overall cost (-all inclusive) cost is probably about the same. Don't forget that conscripts are not a substitute for professional soldiers (especially if the banter of TA vs regular on this site is to be taken as a yardstick).

    Bottom line is Greece is broke and it has one of the biggest military arsenals of any western european (and NATO member) country. We all know if it came down to it the Greeks wouldn't be able to stand up to the Turks, but then as NATO members, they wouldn't have to. So why don't they stop pretending and start selling?
     
  10. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    What he said...
     
  11. Andy_S

    Andy_S LE Book Reviewer

    SNIP
    Have you mentioned who pays the conscripts? Their true cost surely is a hell lot more than 10 quid while serving, assuming they remain employed. Conscripts usually remain on their employer's payroll during service (though this may differ from country to country) and are usually reimbursed to a degree by the government.
    SNIP

    As you say..."may differ from country to country."

    It does. Out here, conscription falls on those who have just finished school or uni and so are not in full time employment. No reimbursement required, the government gets cheap squaddies and loads of them.

    As for the Greeks selling hardware:
    Would this actually make any dent in their deficit? Moreover, given that Greece is (as noted) part of NATO, do you not think that their units (and so weaponry) are not slotted into the alliance's orbat?
     
  12. They never seem to contribute much to outside area ops (happy to be corrected on this one)