Heinz Wolff 29 April 1928 - 15 Dec 2017

snapper

War Hero
Anyone remember the 'Great Egg Race' and the 'Young Scientist of the Year' on the telly back in the day?

Sadly Heinz Wolff, the Mad Professor that presented them has gone to the lab in the sky. His programmes were always something to look forward to and without doubt led to more than one kid nearly destroying the garden shed doing experiments!

RIP Heinz and thanks for inspiring generations of kids to look at things with an inquisitive mind and improve/invent rather than just accept things as they were.
 
Anyone remember the 'Great Egg Race' and the 'Young Scientist of the Year' on the telly back in the day?

Sadly Heinz Wolff, the Mad Professor that presented them has gone to the lab in the sky. His programmes were always something to look forward to and without doubt led to more than one kid nearly destroying the garden shed doing experiments!

RIP Heinz and thanks for inspiring generations of kids to look at things with an inquisitive mind and improve/invent rather than just accept things as they were.
Have to be honest, I thought he’d pegged it years ago.
Shame, he is one of the abiding memories of my formative years. That quirky foreign accent and the sheer lunacy of some of his ‘experiments’ on the Great Egg Race.
He was a German Jewish refugee who moved to this country at the outbreak of WW2 and went on to earn a first class degree with honours at Oxford.
His eccentricity still brings a smile to my face. RIP
 
I loved the great egg race when I was a kid, it'd be great to see a new version of the show brought back
 
It's his total enthusiasm I remember 100 percent attack on any project.
With that level of determination and enthusiasm he would have made a great commander I think. His briefings would have been a lot more fun than many that I had to suffer anyway.

RIP Heinz.
 
I subbed some groundwork from a contractor at Brunel University some years ago. We were always on site and working before the staff and the students started turning up.

I was sat in an excavator waiting for some aggregate to be tipped when he drove by on his way into work. I recognised him from the tv program. He saw me looking over and smiled and waved like we knew each other.

I did used to enjoy his programs. Rest in Peace to him.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I subbed some groundwork from a contractor at Brunel University some years ago. We were always on site and working before the staff and the students started turning up.

I was sat in an excavator waiting for some aggregate to be tipped when he drove by on his way into work. I recognised him from the tv program. He saw me looking over and smiled and waved like we knew each other.

I did used to enjoy his programs. Rest in Peace to him.
Time Team Walt.
 
My first recollection of him was when they were doing the Great Egg Race in the old Battersea Power Station. Marvellous communicator for an academic, seemed like a nice bloke.

RIP.
 

NSP

LE
I remember TGER. Some of the solutions the team came up with were pure genius.

I loved the quirky theme and the egg machine in the opening credits, too.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
So no more bratwurst in the field then?
 
My school took us to the Christmas Lectures one year and he presented; really entertaining. It’s a sad loss to the world of science.
 
Heard about his passing away and caught the BBC 4 programme yesterday about his past with his son’s input.

Never knew he invented the gel pad electrodes for ECGs and also a type of self dosing pain relief system ( for his wife) .

True gent and even this morning , having a few friends over for a British breakfast we had a wee Nip to his memory.

Loved the Egg programme.
 

UORMan

War Hero
Anyone else remember when they did TGER from Germany, and it opened with a Stally going into a swimming pool of similar.
They had a team from REME Tech Services, one from the RAF and another from the Navy. Never been so embarrassed to be REME, I think they came third.
Greta guy.
 

Bollox

War Hero
I remember him from my youth, he had the knack of presenting science in a way that would grab a kids attention. Probably was the initiator for many choosing science as a career
 
Heinz Wolff and Magnus Pyke were truly great scientific eccentrics.
 
Heinz Wolff and Magnus Pyke were truly great scientific eccentrics.
David Bellamy, another joy to watch and listen to. He was/is a very physically demonstrative presenter (in a good way) my bruv was a Durham with him and said that he clambered up onto the bench at the front of the lecture hall, laid on it, then demonstrated the actions and movements of a seal that he was trying to convey. Much applause from the gathered unwashed.
 
Met him briefly when he came to present prizes on Speech Day at a school I worked in: Seemed a very warm and genuine guy in person, and his address, on the theme of "bought-in risk" colours my attitude to this day. (The idea can be summarised as follows: If you build cars with crumple zones, airbags and safety cages, many people will drive more recklessly to achieve a set level of tolerable risk. The best way to reduce pedestrian deaths on the roads is to make new drivers drive cars with steel spikes in place of airbags, to correct their perception of risk. If you risk assess daily life to tedium, people will go cave diving or freeclimbing to achieve a suitable level of risk.)
 

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