Heart Attacks and Ex-Forces

#1
Earlier this week my pal was a funeral for a bloke who had only just left the army (although luckily for his widow technically he hadn't). He's driving a truck in his new civvy job, felt a bit unwell, pulled over and died. Heart attack at 42.

Last year a soldier the same age or a smidgen younger has a heart attack in the bogs when they were adventure training in Fort William - fit bloke, massive heart attack and died. His slightly older OC, early 50's, took a big breath while watching the telly and died.

So, in short, stress, electric soup, smoking and a cooked breakfast every morning really don't do you any good. The worrying thing is that phys probably disguises the underlying problem and also may dislodge the plaque on the artery walls.

There was a good prog earlier this week on Radio 4 on statins and control of cholesterol. If you fit into the fit forty year old long-service smoker and drinker you might want to get your cholesterol and blood pressure checked, and if necessary take statins. Blokes in their forties should not be dying of bloody heart attacks.
 
#2
this is why you should always fully commute your pension! - otherwise the government wins!!

I've always wondered why we don't get more medical check ups - I had one on joining up and one when I was thirty, apparently thats regarded as being enough to see me through to my pre-lease medical at 40.
 
#3
Can only echo the setiments above. Have just got out of hospital after having 3 stents fitted after a very mild heart attack of my very own. :(

I am still in my 40s (just) and have visted the doc all of once since I left, for a twisted ankle, never felt ill so never visted the doc. Didn't even think about the fact that at 40+ I am in a highish risk group.

Take the morning off on Monday and get your self MOT'd by the doc, it don't hurt (much) and it might just save your life.

If you don't bother then don't come crying to me when you snuff it. :twisted:
 
#4
Invest in a blood pressure tester….a good one from boots costs about 50 quid……test yourself every week……you can be walking around with high blood pressure and won`t know it till it`s to late ……
 
#5
1 guy had heart surgery at 42, another had a heart attack at 35 whilst still serving, the third was dead at 43. Its more common than you think.
 
#6
At least the fella had the descency to pull over before he died. I hate waiting ages on the motorway due to fatal crashes.

Right, time to finish my lard sandwich, and pop out for a smoke :)
 
#9
The military pension is computed on the reckoning that many recipients do not survive very long after retirement to collect it. That is why it is only index linked after 55 - those that reach that age are, basically, on borrowed time. An ex-matelot pal had been out about 2 years and was amazed how many funerals of ex-comrades he had been to.

Certainly, guys who have done long periods in BAOR with cheap booze and ciggies are very much at risk. Apparently, the average life expectancy for Guards SNCOs is about 2-3 years after leaving.
 
#10
I don't know how useful check ups are. I went to a "Well Man Clinic" for a check up at 53 and was given a clean bill of health, 4 weeks later I had my first heart attack and a week later my second. I hadn't smoked for 18 years and hardly drunk at all except tea for 20. 17 years later ,with medication, and I'm still plodding on.Heart attacks, like shit, happen.
 
#11
craftsmanx said:
I don't know how useful check ups are. I went to a "Well Man Clinic" for a check up at 53 and was given a clean bill of health, 4 weeks later I had my first heart attack and a week later my second. I hadn't smoked for 18 years and hardly drunk at all except tea for 20. 17 years later ,with medication, and I'm still plodding on.Heart attacks, like s***, happen.
Glad you're still around mucker. Despite the usual booze/fags track during service, I was healthy with only the odd minor op on wings & limbs due to the uncompromising physical aspect of our chosen profession. Cut back on the drink to practically zero and within four years succumbed to colon cancer.
 
#12
I suppose it just proves that you dont have to be healthy to be fit and vice versa. I second the idea of buying a blood pressure monitor. I am only 21 and dont suffer from any probs but I like to keep track of my BP. Gives me peace of mind and alerts me if I am doing something wrong.

J.
 
#13
I got out at my 12 year point, and monitor the Tank Transporter forums quite a lot. Its been a shocking couple of years for guys leaving at their 22 and keeling over dead shortly after. I've just had a check up at 37 (Heart, bloods etc) and it all came back fine. I'm putting it down to quitting smoking after leaving and not drinking a fraction of what I used to.
Oh, and a wife that can cook healthy food!
 
#14
I think its the stress of civvy street thats the problem after the time spent in the forces. It is hard to adapt.
 
#15
gobbyidiot said:
Earlier this week my pal was a funeral for a bloke who had only just left the army (although luckily for his widow technically he hadn't). He's driving a truck in his new civvy job, felt a bit unwell, pulled over and died. Heart attack at 42.

Last year a soldier the same age or a smidgen younger has a heart attack in the bogs when they were adventure training in Fort William - fit bloke, massive heart attack and died. His slightly older OC, early 50's, took a big breath while watching the telly and died.

So, in short, stress, electric soup, smoking and a cooked breakfast every morning really don't do you any good. The worrying thing is that phys probably disguises the underlying problem and also may dislodge the plaque on the artery walls.

There was a good prog earlier this week on Radio 4 on statins and control of cholesterol. If you fit into the fit forty year old long-service smoker and drinker you might want to get your cholesterol and blood pressure checked, and if necessary take statins. Blokes in their forties should not be dying of bloody heart attacks.
Its hard to say what caused it without knowing if there were underlying causes i.e. Blood pressure, cholesterol, heart defect, obesity?

How many civvies in the same age group etc also suffer the same consequence?
 
#16
Don't know if this is true, heard it years ago when I was in, that 40% of pers(All services) who serve 22 years or more then retire, do not live long enough to collect thier full pension. Thats one hell of a statistic.

But the saying goes: There's lies, damn lies, and statistics.!!

Hang in there guys.

CTC
 
#17
I started a thread about this a couple of weeks ago . . . This is the bulk of it:

When I was on my WOs course, way back in 1986 we had a lecture from a guy from the pensions office. He told us, in answer to a question about not getting the full pension until age 55, that 72% of servicemen that do the full 22 years don't get to age 55.

Now I don't know what the stats are these days (I'd be interested if anyone does) but it was a frightening statistic back then. Well, I got to 55 early in 2006 (on my birthday as it happens) so was quite happy to get the pension. However, in June last year I had a heart attack; May this year I had an angiogram and 6 weeks ago I had a double by-pass.

The surgeons were quick to say that if you are pre-disposed to coronary artery disease then you'll get it. They were also adamant that smoking, drinking to excess and eating unhealthily were bad things that will exascerbate the condition, if you're going to get it. The fact that I had kept myself fit and had never smoked was a distinct positive in getting over the heart attack and recovering from the op.

So why am I telling you this. Well it's not for sympathy, it's as a warning. My surgeon was very interested when I told him about the pension stats and how rich army food is, and how much soldiers can put away! There are lots of reasons to die but there are plenty of people who will tell you that heart disease is one of the biggest killers. It may well be that during your army career you are sowing the seeds for problems later in life.

You can though mitigate the condition. Stay fit and healthy, keep the weight under control, stop smoking and see your doctor about seemingly insignificant but frequent twinges - I was getting a small sensation in my left pectoral muscle and tingling in my left fingers during exercise for about 5 months before the heart attack.
 
#18
Naaaaa the top brass have a Ninja Squad that goes round poisoning all ex squadies so it saves on paying them pensions.

They use KCI in large doses from blow pipes B Liar told me so.


/GR
 
#19
Tell you the thing I always thought about cookhouse food - it's the chips that do the damage. If you heat oil repeatedly it acquires the same characteristics as hydrogenated vegetable fat, and some places use hydrogenated oil right from the start as an economy measure - it basically never goes off. That shit is poison - it's been known for a long time that it kills you, I heard a researcher say recently that the safe limit for this stuff is zero. So I'd ditch the chips, and anything else deep fried. Double beans and tomatoes, cereal and toast at brekkie might be an idea as well; sod the mystery sausages, streaky bacon and fried bread.

Remember the bloke on Supersize Me who ate two Big Macs a day and was thin with no apparent problems? His secret - he never touched the fries or the drinks.
 
#20
Funny the number of people seem to die at 42...maybe it really is the answer to life, the universe and everything.

I mention it purely because Dad was another one of those who dropped dead about 18 months after his 22 finished. He was a phys maniac while he was in, but he didn't keep it up afterwards. And of course he was a 20-a-day man for about 25 years.
 

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