hearing test

I also wouldn't worry too much - as long as you pay attention to the instructions for the test, you will either pass it or not (if you know you have H1, H2 hearing, confirmed by audiometry, then you will be fine). Spend enough time in the infantry and I can guarantee you you will not have H1,H2 Hearing for long........
that's great so I will get in with at least H2H2 to the infantry as long as my medical is spot on. sound mate thanks for all your help.
 
Bloody hard when you can't hear the questions!
My leaving medical was a jolly sight different to my joining one. The whisper behind your back worked well in 1976 as I could lip read in his mirror. The sound chamber was horrific when I left, they gave me £1500 for the privilege of part deafening me.
I got about the same... :razz:

...by which time I was already in the TA for another 13 years of loud bangs... :-D
 
Last time (3 years ago) my hearing was tested the bloke asked whether I had any hearing destroying hobbies like firing guns or riding loud motorcycles.
He didn't like my answer.
However my hearing in excellent though the H1 etc definition means nothing to me.
 

Bobby_Bert

Clanker
@Mr Tweedy has hit the nail firmly on the head for you.

The eligibility standards are stringent for a reason. Hearing is a critical sense required to communicate, keep situational awareness, hear commands and so on.

Incidentally, the attitude and approach to Noise Induced Hearing Loss has really improved in recent years. The effect of noise in our profession is permanent and disabling. The Army has a moral and legal duty to protect our soldiers from this sort of damage. And it costs us - we are wasting both talent and money.

Hearing conservation is a matter of good leadership. Did you know that commanders at all levels are encouraged to take this issue very seriously, particularly us Inf sorts!

Did you know A passenger travelling in the back of a Warrior will be exposed to a continuous noise of around 104dB. Without any hearing protection that passenger would exceed their daily exposure limit within just 6 minutes.

Any NCO’s or nerdy Subalterns reading this should have a gander and the below via MODNET- it might just help keep you out of the shit.
13BEA6C7-381B-47B6-ACC4-28CF2DC6D056.jpeg
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Certainly moved on since “don’t wear ear defenders during live firing - you won’t be able to hear the commander’s orders”!

and 81mm is another level of damaging.
 
@Mr Tweedy has hit the nail firmly on the head for you.

The eligibility standards are stringent for a reason. Hearing is a critical sense required to communicate, keep situational awareness, hear commands and so on.

Incidentally, the attitude and approach to Noise Induced Hearing Loss has really improved in recent years. The effect of noise in our profession is permanent and disabling. The Army has a moral and legal duty to protect our soldiers from this sort of damage. And it costs us - we are wasting both talent and money.

Hearing conservation is a matter of good leadership. Did you know that commanders at all levels are encouraged to take this issue very seriously, particularly us Inf sorts!

Did you know A passenger travelling in the back of a Warrior will be exposed to a continuous noise of around 104dB. Without any hearing protection that passenger would exceed their daily exposure limit within just 6 minutes.

Any NCO’s or nerdy Subalterns reading this should have a gander and the below via MODNET- it might just help keep you out of the shit.
View attachment 443833
Very impressive, tick in the box and another H&SE accolade.
Son and heir had his ears blasted to buggery on H17 (2013), as a warrior driver and then behind the GPMG in a BRF role he certainly lost a couple of hearing ranges and matches his grandfather whose hearing was screwed in Aden. However his grandfather got a war pension of £1800 pa, he blamed it on the .303!
 

Bobby_Bert

Clanker
Very impressive, tick in the box and another H&SE accolade.
Son and heir had his ears blasted to buggery on H17 (2013), as a warrior driver and then behind the GPMG in a BRF role he certainly lost a couple of hearing ranges and matches his grandfather whose hearing was screwed in Aden. However his grandfather got a war pension of £1800 pa, he blamed it on the .303!
Tell your boy to get the claim in. Plenty already have.

Civil court claims for NIHL has cost the MOD approximately £60M over 5 years (2010- 2015) with an average cost of about £7K per claim. This does not include the cost
to the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme or more significantly the cost of losing trained manpower due to medical downgrading/discharge as a result of NIHL.
(My Source: Report ‘Understanding the financial cost of NIHL’by MAS(A) dated 24 Nov 15- granted its out of date)

Armed Forces Compensation scheme have a mighty money tree. I was awarded 6k following an on duty injury.
 
@Mr Tweedy has hit the nail firmly on the head for you.


Did you know A passenger travelling in the back of a Warrior will be exposed to a continuous noise of around 104dB. Without any hearing protection that passenger would exceed their daily exposure limit within just 6 minutes.
awww mate very informative cheers for that. when I get to reg (if all goes well) ill make sure to take your advice on board about hearing protection.
 
Tell your boy to get the claim in. Plenty already have.

Civil court claims for NIHL has cost the MOD approximately £60M over 5 years (2010- 2015) with an average cost of about £7K per claim. This does not include the cost
to the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme or more significantly the cost of losing trained manpower due to medical downgrading/discharge as a result of NIHL.
(My Source: Report ‘Understanding the financial cost of NIHL’by MAS(A) dated 24 Nov 15- granted its out of date)

Armed Forces Compensation scheme have a mighty money tree. I was awarded 6k following an on duty injury.
Sadly we have been shaking that bloody tree for years. Hearing loss is part of a package including a gsw with residual problems. The veterans agency are dragging their feet (they have a very long list to sort out) and the legal teams for a number we know have had their claims bounced, at least three times as in our case. Rather hoping the new Veterans team 'Johny et al' will sort it out. The claims are reasonable easy to validate, but getting the cash is another issue.
As an aside he was a vallon op so ear defenders were discouraged!
 

Mr Tweedy

Old-Salt
@Mr Tweedy has hit the nail firmly on the head for you.

The eligibility standards are stringent for a reason. Hearing is a critical sense required to communicate, keep situational awareness, hear commands and so on.

Incidentally, the attitude and approach to Noise Induced Hearing Loss has really improved in recent years. The effect of noise in our profession is permanent and disabling. The Army has a moral and legal duty to protect our soldiers from this sort of damage. And it costs us - we are wasting both talent and money.

Hearing conservation is a matter of good leadership. Did you know that commanders at all levels are encouraged to take this issue very seriously, particularly us Inf sorts!

Did you know A passenger travelling in the back of a Warrior will be exposed to a continuous noise of around 104dB. Without any hearing protection that passenger would exceed their daily exposure limit within just 6 minutes.

Any NCO’s or nerdy Subalterns reading this should have a gander and the below via MODNET- it might just help keep you out of the shit.
View attachment 443833
It came too late for some of us - rolled up flanellette stuffed in lugholes whilst learning to shoot as a boy soldier was the start of the damage, by I time I got to Brecon as an instructor, I was given some electronic ear defenders and being encouraged to use them with a set of yellow foam plugs (as I had already some NIHL), but it was still some years until this became official. I Suspect, with my cynical head on, it was the rise of claims that made it such an issue, but it is really important that it is taken seriously - it doesn't take much exposure to lose it, and once gone it is gone.
 
Tell your boy to get the claim in. Plenty already have.

Civil court claims for NIHL has cost the MOD approximately £60M over 5 years (2010- 2015) with an average cost of about £7K per claim. This does not include the cost
to the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme or more significantly the cost of losing trained manpower due to medical downgrading/discharge as a result of NIHL.
(My Source: Report ‘Understanding the financial cost of NIHL’by MAS(A) dated 24 Nov 15- granted its out of date)

Armed Forces Compensation scheme have a mighty money tree. I was awarded 6k following an on duty injury.
Interesting - when I left in 2015 after 37 years I was told down in Gosport I wasn't entitled to anything despite having service-induced NIHL (H3) diagnosed after an NI tour in 1986.
 
Certainly moved on since “don’t wear ear defenders during live firing - you won’t be able to hear the commander’s orders”!

and 81mm is another level of damaging.
Yep, or the ever popular phrase thrown out by the DS when marching to the ranges "that's the Med Centre any of you poofs want to fall out for some cotton wool for your ears?". H3 both sides now, I kinda wish I had. Still they have given me some very fetching hearing aids and the batteries are free.
 
81mm is another level of damaging.
Ain't that the truth. I fired one round on Charge 3 without ear defs (it was a howling day and I'd pushed them aside so I could hear the CPO). I never made that mistake again! I'm H2, H3 now.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Ain't that the truth. I fired one round on Charge 3 without ear defs (it was a howling day and I'd pushed them aside so I could hear the CPO). I never made that mistake again! I'm H2, H3 now.
Yup. Even with best practice double ear defence you can’t bring it into safe levels. Most of my firing was with cheap as chips amplivox and did the same as you a couple of times.

Same damage!
 

Fake Sheikh

Old-Salt
@The_Duke
This will make you chuckle. *Sanitised for opsec*

View attachment 443838
Last QM used to issue that guide to all Range Safety Officers and the troops, all very PC.
Seems in his day as The Duke has mentioned it was not mandatory now it definatley is.
Too many cases of the Military being sued or Troops being downgraded due to hearing loss.
 
I do know you don't wear ear plugs when firing Charlie G.
I had to use snipe nosed pliers to pull the ear plug out of the left ear of an idiot who did.
It wasn't the lack of hearing protection when firing the 84 it was the poor position of the sights on the older models. The optical sight and the flip out iron battle sights were alligned much lower on the side of the barrel so that ears were very close to the barrel when firing. The sights seem to be much better designed these days.



I had to fire it with the basic iron sights in 1976. Both myself and the loader were handed a pair of amplivox ear defenders along with two rounds each of 84mm.

Loading was a doddle as the amplivox fitted snug over both ears. However, when firing the amplivox over the right ear prevented the firer from getting the right eye to line up with the sight properly (we were using the iron sights). In order to aim properly we had to push the amplivox on the right ear up and off the ear so that the side of the head and ear was resting against the plastic padding on the barrel. It damaged my right eardrum sufficiently that it has been ringing ever since. Over a year later I went for a Pulheems review and the doc noticed physical damage to the right eardrum.
 
Last edited:

Latest Threads

Top