Head of French armed forces resigns over budget cuts row

#62
Talking of social media/media
So the French military show support for a general who protested against cuts that would affect the French military. Quelle surprise.

In other news priests show support for the pope's choice of hat
 
#63
I didn't seek to cheapen the move by a French officer who's hand was forced by leaks that made his comments public. I think he had no choice but to resign. I sought to explain that I don't think it's generally appropriate for officers to resign because the defence budget is being cut by democratically elected politicians. It's certainly not honourable if done so in a public manner; that's just petulance.
Thereby confirming the difference in both our respective cultures and sentiments. As you once again confirm your perfectly logical assumption that he would be sacked, why belittle him for making a ‘grand gesture’ for what he undoubtedly feels strongly about, and ‘cheapen' it by describing it as mere petulance.

The men serving under him would very probably not see it quite the same way as you.
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#64
Thereby confirming the difference in both our respective cultures and sentiments. As you once again confirm your perfectly logical assumption that he would be sacked, why belittle him for making a ‘grand gesture’ for what he undoubtedly feels strongly about, and ‘cheapen' it by describing it as mere petulance.

The men serving under him would very probably not see it quite the same way as you.
Again, where did I say his move was petulance? As I've now said three times, once his comments were made public he had little choice but to resign. What I said was that, in general (as in, not talking about this instance) I think there is no honour in resigning because you disagree with cuts.
 

Sixty

ADC
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#66
Predictably.


Given that I've long understood you as a stranger to integrity, it comes as no surprise that you would seek to cheapen the decision made by a French officer for what to my eyes appear - as I am confident that I have explained to anyone with a grasp of English - to be the most admirable of reasons.

Here endeth this conversation.
The axes that you're attempting, again, to grind against another member are becoming dull. Stop it.
 

Caecilius

LE
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Book Reviewer
#67
...'in that situation'...I believe was reference to what the thread is about, though of course I may be mistaken.
I'm afraid you are. It's a reference to a hypothetical in the discussion between myself and Stonker.

I made it clear on the first page of the thread that I don't think this is a petulant resignation:

In fairness, he was somewhat forced into it.
 

Guns

ADC
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#69
Can't you two throbbers arrange a BBQ at which you can fill each other in or something?
I believe car parks are the Arrse'ers venue of choice if I remember rightly.
 
#71
Put simply, that's beside the point.

Principled, honourable behaviour is this: faced with the prospect of implementing policies with which you are fundamentally at odds; having repeatedly advised agin 'em and been slapped down, the only thing one can do, is to resign. As publicly as possible, where matters of National importance are concerned.

The notion that one can compromise on that, and still be able to look oneself in the eye whilst shaving is evidence of a very contingent understanding of what constitutes principle, as does the mealy-mouthed patter about having more beneficial impact by remaining inside the tent. That's mere compromise.

Principle says "I believe it is wrong, and I see no prospect of getting you, as my gaffer, to take a similar view, so I will have no part of it, under any circumstance. Here's my papers"

Look up the late Robin Cook MP for an example.

I now sit back and await others, strangers to integrity, posting cynical comments about directorships and other nonsense to suggest that somehow they see through a sham.
In realtion to Macron, the inexperience of youth.
 
#77
This urgently requires a 3* Working Group NOT just a couple of 1*s. Once the project is finished and pensions secured, then and only then can a couple of 1*s can do the job.
You overlooked the need to recruit several thousand FTRS commissioned staff posts required to make the brews............
 
#79

Sarastro

LE
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#80
Well, according to the BBC this morning some 85,000 troops are due to leave the army over the next few years.

I assume that this represents those leaving at the end of their careers as well as those signing off early.

Our leaders won't need to resign - with the general lack of new recruits they won't have much of an army left to lead in a few years. A couple of 1* should be able to cope with the main role of defending London...
Current strength (optimistic figures) = 79,000
Reserves (if counted, optimistic figures) = 26,000
Total = 105,000

So...in "a few years", only 19% of the Army will have been in today. 4 in 5 will be sprogs. No SNCOs or officers above Captain. Figures not much better if you assume "army" means "military", in which case the top line figure is 196,000 meaning only 50% of the military will be sprogs. I mean, that kind of pogrom might be a fantastic way to get rid of all the tired old animals that just glue up the system rather than usefully contributing to glue factory output, but somehow I think recruitment and retention is bad, but not quite that bad.

More likely that the BBC might have got something wrong, as, with the honourable exception of Mark Urban, their Defence-related news these days consists of a Twitter account following Michael Fallon, a Google alert for "army OR iraq OR afghanistan OR SAS" and a post-it with Richard Kemp's mobile number.
 

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