ARRSE is supported by the advertisements on it, so if you use an adblocker please consider helping us by starting an Ad-Free subscription.

Head of French armed forces resigns over budget cuts row

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by QRK2, Jul 19, 2017.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. I am suggesting that a VSO retiring on a point of principle is not sedition, treason or attempting to undermine the Government of the day.
     
  2. No need to get stroppy; however if it takes you "hours" to do a search, you should probably step away from the internet.
     
    • Show again braincell Show again braincell x 1
  3. Put simply, that's beside the point.

    Principled, honourable behaviour is this: faced with the prospect of implementing policies with which you are fundamentally at odds; having repeatedly advised agin 'em and been slapped down, the only thing one can do, is to resign. As publicly as possible, where matters of National importance are concerned.

    The notion that one can compromise on that, and still be able to look oneself in the eye whilst shaving is evidence of a very contingent understanding of what constitutes principle, as does the mealy-mouthed patter about having more beneficial impact by remaining inside the tent. That's mere compromise.

    Principle says "I believe it is wrong, and I see no prospect of getting you, as my gaffer, to take a similar view, so I will have no part of it, under any circumstance. Here's my papers"

    Look up the late Robin Cook MP for an example.

    I now sit back and await others, strangers to integrity, posting cynical comments about directorships and other nonsense to suggest that somehow they see through a sham.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2017
    • Like Like x 5
    • Informative Informative x 2
  4. Ta, but I was wondering about your 'Defence of the Ream' point!!

    Sent from my SM-N910F using Tapatalk
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  5. Perhaps you should step away from this thread :roll:
     
  6. Seeing as how General de Villiers is 60 I suspect his pension is already in the bag
     
  7. seaweed

    seaweed LE Book Reviewer

    You have no idea of what was said behind closed doors, have you? It is as much an offence against discipline for general to talk to the media without permission as it is for a private.
     
  8. seaweed

    seaweed LE Book Reviewer

    Robin Cook was a politician, not a serving officer.

    Ultimately it is the Government that decides funding and that's that.

    This sort of thread always seems to bring forth people parading their chippy ignorance.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. That a mere politician - a left winger, at that - should behave honourably, when no serving General could see a need to, puts the military to shame, is how I see it.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Show again braincell Show again braincell x 1
  10. Nah. If we're going strictly by historical precedent here, old Boney would have first promoted the general for bringing these matters to his attention, and then he would have shot him for dereliction of duty by making these matters public.
     
    • Funny Funny x 3
  11. Ah :)
     
  12. Caecilius

    Caecilius LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    I disagree.

    The Robin Cook example is apt. Resignation is honourable when asked to carry out an order with which you disagree, so resignations (like yours) over the army going into Iraq are legitimate if you disagree with that.

    That situation, however, is a far cry from disagreeing with budget cuts. We sign up and swear an oath to serve the queen, who exercises her power through her democratically elected government. If you disagree with government policy then it remains your job to carry out that policy unless you believe it to be immoral (see Iraq example). It's hard to argue that budget cuts are immoral, so I'm afraid I think a petulant resignation in that situation is less an example of principle and more of self gratification.
     
  13. rampant

    rampant LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    Talking of social media/media

     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  14. Predictably.

    Given that I've long understood you as a stranger to integrity, it comes as no surprise that you would seek to cheapen the decision made by a French officer for what to my eyes appear - as I am confident that I have explained to anyone with a grasp of English - to be the most admirable of reasons.

    Here endeth this conversation.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
    • Show again braincell Show again braincell x 1
  15. Caecilius

    Caecilius LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    Why can you never just disagree politely and without personal attacks?

    I didn't seek to cheapen the move by a French officer who's hand was forced by leaks that made his comments public. I think he had no choice but to resign. I sought to explain that I don't think it's generally appropriate for officers to resign because the defence budget is being cut by democratically elected politicians. It's certainly not honourable if done so in a public manner; that's just petulance.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1