"he today that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother"

#1
[align=center]St. Crispians' Day, 25 October, 1415, near Agincourt[/align]

[align=center]”This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'

Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember with advantages
What feats he did that day: then shall our names.
Familiar in his mouth as household words
Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.

This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remember'd;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.”
[/align]

[align=right]from Henry V - Shakespear[/align]
 
#2
Good one - did you write it yourself, or did a friend assist you? Aah, just noticed the acknowledgement of authorship. Did you type it yourself, or did a friend type it for you? :D

A dissertation on "Who was Crispin/Crispian [or both] anyway, and why couldn't he spell his own name [or names]?" would add substance, methinks. :D

Raising a glass anyway (aaargh, that's 5 today already, and only a forthinghtishing-ish [couple of weeks] to Remembrance Sunday) to those very early bold soldier boys who were rather well led, quite motivated, seriously under-paid, occasionally rotovated, etc. etc.

Still, it taught Johnny Foreigner to mess with the Brits, as usual.
 
#3
‘Cobblers’ blue, Crispin AND Crispian were cobblers, evangelists and brothers. Martyred together, canonised together, and shared the same Saints day till the Church re-allocated it. :D

No.9
ps, good to see an IO posting
 
#4
Missed Agincourt Day, must getting old and slipping.
We had a debate on it some moons ago after I had watched the 'Battlefield Dectectives' program.
A tribute to the original small 'Band of Brothers'.
john
Always enjoy a good frog stuffing watched Ceaser doing the Gauls at Alesia, on BD.
 
#5
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.
Ahh.What more can anyone say?Especially they who never wore the uniform of their country?
 
#9
Letterwritingman said:
Perhaps an ARRse calender? I personally remember key points of British history however we ought to draw more attention to Battkes and Battle Honours
Now that's a good idea... in a corner, on line... so we can see which victories fell on this day (and the merest smattering of defeats to keep us in check)... and then Arrsers in the know can gob off about them and the rest of us can learn. (Put me down to start a thread on Crécy day (26 Aug)... more than :D to share what little I know about that one.)
 
#10
Ref Balaclava, ironic that on the day that we'd have been celebrating a badly-organised charge by the Frogs, they should step in and help us after ours?

"C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas la guerre"
 
#11
whiffler said:
Ref Balaclava, ironic that on the day that we'd have been celebrating a badly-organised charge by the Frogs, they should step in and help us after ours?

"C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas la guerre"
Ah, but the 93rd had a good scrap, as did Scarlett's Heavy Brigade!

Incidentally, it was Capt J J Brandling, OC of C Troop RHA, accompanied by one of his Bombardiers, who went and recovered Nolan's body.

The BC of C Bty used to have a superb presentation sword on his office wall, given to Brandling in appreciation of his efforts on the day.
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#13
Nice idea, in a previous Unit of mine, we used to publish the Corps VC's on their anniversaries with a citation. Well the RAMC had so many.
 
#14
”an ARRse calendar”

Agree a great idea, but perhaps not as hard as setting the criteria for inclusion? For example, how small a battle gets included, does anyone arbitrate on which qualify, and, if it’s quite a lesser known battle should the contributor provided a footnote, and if so, does it go with the listing or get linked to elsewhere on the site?

john, interesting you mention Alesia as just like prior to Agincourt, both forces went though a phase of shadowing each other along a river, and both winners were the numerically inferior side.

No.9
 
#15
No.9 said:
”an ARRse calendar”

Agree a great idea, but perhaps not as hard as setting the criteria for inclusion? For example, how small a battle gets included, does anyone arbitrate on which qualify, and, if it’s quite a lesser known battle should the contributor provided a footnote, and if so, does it go with the listing or get linked to elsewhere on the site?

No.9
Listing initially based on Battle Honours (at least for the more recent centuries)? Is AARSE Admin willing to take on the mission, including abitration? Could be a rather large job, unless there's an extant listing somewhere else just begging to be plagiarised! :D
 
#16
That sounds a practical criteria blue :thumright:, a British Army Battle Honours timeline.

Thinking on, (yes, it sometimes happens), there is the ARRSEPedia section where something like this can just be ‘done’, would look like a timeline and can be edited and contributed to by anyone – and therein could be problem?

Say the interested posters in the History section decide upon a nice tidy format, and stick to it. Someone with a different idea changes it and sparks off a revert war and bun fight. Or someone includes a battle not on a Battle Honour but it’s one their relative died in, another revert war etc. :?

Perhaps our REME could engineer a Wiki section that can only be accessed through the History section? Or, we can divide the year up among those who want to be scribes, and then have them maintain their allotted dates by editing ‘their’ post??? :scratch:

No.9
 
#17
Getting back to Henry V…………………rather Henry V 1415, and Normandy 529 years later.

The words of Henry V, still quoted today, come from Shakespeares' play of around 180 years later, not Henry. Henry was not the first (or last) to thump the French or land an army in Normandy, but he remained a popular hero surrounded by attributes a story-teller can readily exploit. A boy soldier joining his father in battle from age 14, a successful commander by 16, one of the boys in the pub when away from princely duties yet fiercely religious, King at 26, victor of the French though outnumbered around 5 to 1, married a French princess, had a French kingdom lined-up and died young at 35 just before it was supposed to fall into place – and all during the turmoil of the War of the Roses power struggle in Britain.

During WWII, stage and film actor Laurence Olivier was given consent by HM Government, (for whom he worked in a PR/fund raising capacity), to produce a morale boosting film adaptation of Henry V. Choice of actors and crew was awkward to say the least, but, with a considerable budget of over £470’000 and the ‘old boy’/’lovie’ network, quite a lot was achieved. The all important battle was filmed in Ireland with most extras coming from the Irish Home Guard though a number of other servicemen, particularly Americans, appeared to ‘find’ time to take part. Several sections of the play were omitted in the film and Agincourt was filmed in glorious sunshine with mounted knights sweeping over spacious grassy fields. Not accurate but, the film is praiseworthy in itself and succeeded as an important flag-waver for 1944 before the advent of D-Day.

The film went out with the following dedication:
’To the Commandos and Airborne troops of Great Britain, the spirit of whose ancestors it has been humbly attempted to recapture in some ensuing scenes, this film is dedicated.’

Veterans of 1 SS Brigade who were present at the time, have told me Lord Lovat borrowed heavily from Henry V when addressing the Brigade before D-Day embarkation. There’s no mention of this in Lovats’ memoir, and as none of the Veterans can remember what was actually said, I would say the speech was in the style of Oliviers’ delivery rather than a crib of text? They all said they saw the film, and apparently a special showing was arranged for them. Have to wonder if the French Troops of No.4 Commando went along?

A more recent adaptation is that of Kenneth Branagh in 1989, which, without the wartime constrains, IMHO has a pure gold cast. However, whether you prefer Olivier or Branagh I doubt if either version will become first choice moral booster over Zulu?


____Henry 1413_____________Olivier 1944________________________Branagh 1989

No.9
 

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