Hawker Hurricane

#2
Unfairly knocked for not being a Spitfire. However, we'd have been screwed without the Hurries.
 
#5
But there was always "notional"......

Well there was plenty of "notional" things in the army of the 70's, can't see the Woar being any different.
 
#6
I've always liked the Hurricane. It seemed like it was the hard grafting older brother, saving for his own house. While the Spitfire was the flashier younger sibling shagging all the birds, whilst living at home.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#7
They fly Hurricanes, isn't it?, them's shit planes for remtards on free dinners
 
#8
Also had a much higher availability rate during the BoB than the Spitfire. It was built in the same way as the biplane fighters it replaced and so the RAF was full of ground staff who could maintain it. The Spitfire on the other hand introduced some very advanced construction methods and required significant retraining to look after.

That said, the Hurricane was nearly at the end of its development potential as a result and faded away quite quickly as technology developed durung the war; the Spitfire was at the start and ended up at the end of the war with double the horsepower and was still a credible player.
 
#9
I'm really getting fed up with the DM' increasing misuse of "the" in military articles. Warships are referred o as "the HMS Troutbridge", aircraft are referred to by their serial numbers as "the AB910", it's even spreading to government departments, I regularly see reference to "the HMRC".
Don't even start me on how badly they write nphoto captions...
And breathe...
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
Also had a much higher availability rate during the BoB than the Spitfire. It was built in the same way as the biplane fighters it replaced and so the RAF was full of ground staff who could maintain it. The Spitfire on the other hand introduced some very advanced construction methods and required significant retraining to look after.

That said, the Hurricane was nearly at the end of its development potential as a result and faded away quite quickly as technology developed durung the war; the Spitfire was at the start and ended up at the end of the war with double the horsepower and was still a credible player.
also with the advantage that depending where it was hit, a cannon shell would on occasion go through the fabric and not go off, something that was more likely to happen with the metal-skinned Spitfire.
'faded' might be a bit strong though - they were pretty handy for ground attack in the far east and Africa.
 
#11
Always loved the old girl. Typical British halfway house between old and familiar Vs new and cutting edge. Thankfully we had her in numbers in the BoB and by gum she did well.
Like a lot of aircraft of that time she was rapidly overtaken by technology, but that's the way it was. We went from props to jets in 10 years ?
Not the prettiest or the fastest, but dependable. Bit like the missus actually.
 
#13
Unfairly knocked for not being a Spitfire. However, we'd have been screwed without the Hurries.
When I was a wee lad I remember it being said that the Hurricane had shot-down more Luftwaffe aircraft than all other Allied aircraft combined.

I've never found confirmation of that but I choose to believe it!

14,232 of them built, in service all the way to 1947 with the RAF. I think the last operational flights were either with the Yugoslavs or Portuguese in 1952.
 
#14
Blimey!

The Soviets looked to aero-gun designer B.G. Shpital’nyj from the Yakovlev design bureau in Moscow to design alternative weapon configurations for the Hurricane. With the impending replacement of the type in the fighter role Shpital’nyj was instructed to include ground attack weapons in his redesign. After considering several configurations he eventually settled on;


  • 4x 20 mm ShVAK cannons
  • 2x 7.7 mm ShKAS machine-guns
  • 6x RS-82 ground attack rockets

Soviet Hawker Hurricane Specials
 
#16
Alright own up who started this when people are trying to work ? :-D On Tank busting, I think I'm right in saying the 40 mm mounted on some of the Hurricanes in North Africa saw off a few Panzers. Variants carried rockets and shells.

 
#17
The Belgians had fitted the .5-inch Browning in a four gun fit into their Hurricane Mk 1s in 1940 and a captain called D'Ertsenrijk shjot down at least one He 111 using them. He survived the invasion of Belgium to escape and serve in the RAF later.
 

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