Have the armed forces guards ever opened fire on UK soil?

Freddie Foreman was involved in that raid. By Foreman's account, Dighton said he thought he'd fired five shots, the first two of which were meant as a warning. Foreman says that the second 'warning shot' in fact hit one of his 'firm' in the head, unseen by Mr Dighton, and the fourth round struck another one in the arm.

The man with the head wound died at some point, possibly in one of the getaway vehicles, and other sources suggest that the dead man was buried in a field somewhere (Foreman doesn't comment); the story was then put about that the dead man had absconded to Australia with a mistress, hence his disappearance from the scene.

Foreman claims that it was rare for 'firms' to go out armed with firearms at that point, and the revelation that the banks had been allowed to arm some of those accompanying security vans was the point at which the 'armed blagger' so beloved of Regan and Carter came on the scene with a vengeance.
 
Regarding the incident at Tern Hill. Wasn't this the reason why we moved from 'Duty weapons' to personal weapons on guard? Had the sentry had a zeroed weapon he wouldn't have missed from 30 metres.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
1st July 1916, 57,000 British casualties on the first day of the Somme. 20,000 killed in the first hour, and another 37,000 wounded. Thirty-seven sets of British brothers lost their lives on the battle’s first day, and one man was killed every 4.4 seconds,
That's a bit harsh! ;)
 

Rooper

War Hero
It’s unimaginable to think about those amount of casualties, all from one unit, all mates, 2 days after starting just a handful of men left, I don’t know how they coped with odds like that! It pains me to think of the 454 killed in Afghanistan or the 179 in Iraq, over a greater period of time (years) and from all regiments and corps. Civvies were getting nervous of the coffins coming back through Lynham and Brize. Imagine having to live through the amount of casualties from WW1 & WW2
On a battlefield study a couple of years ago I had the audience staring at me incredulously when I explained that Lijssenthoek CWGC in which we were stood held more bodies than had been killed in conflict since the end of WW2! A very sobering fact.
 
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Gib Bks 1991, early hours of the morning, (shortly after the roving patrols had been bumbling around in a ridiculous 4 man squad for some reason) a suspicious noise comes from the rear of the cookhouse followed by the sound of someone running.

Young SBS drops to his knee and goes firm against the wall.
Figure in dark clothing runs out of the compound - clearly up to no go good.
Rifle in shoulder, challenge issued.
Target still running away from me with something in his hands.
Weapon cocked and challenged again.
Enemy now slows and holds his arms out to the side armed with...…........



2 bottles of milk which the Provo Cpl had sent him over for.

Would have been the most exciting thing happen to me on guard if it wasn't for a TA Reforger type Ex which resulted in many, many Q wagons being stored 'safely' at Minley.
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? ;)

You were lucky it wasn't an angry McDonald Mess monster 5.56 would just annoy her
 
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Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Has anyone mentioned that ****** who shot up the officer on his Submarine?

Definitely qualifies as an “armed forces guard who opened fire on British soil.”

Just for all the wrong reasons.

 
Has anyone mentioned that ****** who shot up the officer on his Submarine?

Definitely qualifies as an “armed forces guard who opened fire on British soil.”

Just for all the wrong reasons.

Yep.
Bin dun.
 
Josef Jacobs

German spy shot by firing squad in the rifle range at the Tower of London. Someone may have mentioned him, I haven't read all of this.
 
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Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Josef Jacobs

German spy shot by firing squad in the rifle range at the Tower of London. Someone may have mentioned him, I haven;t read all of this.
Slight thread drift, but I found out recently that there is a mortuary in the bottom of one of the towers of Tower Bridge.

Due to the tidal structure of the Thames most of the bodies that end up in it, wash up on the south bank, near the bridge.

There were so many (often one a day in Victorian times) that a morgue was necessary. Up until fairly recently it was someone’s job to go down and check the area on a daily basis.

Because it was the closest mortuary to the Tower of London, Jacobs was taken there after the execution and that’s where the autopsy was performed.

 
Slight thread drift, but I found out recently that there is a mortuary in the bottom of one of the towers of Tower Bridge.

Due to the tidal structure of the Thames most of the bodies that end up in it, wash up on the south bank, near the bridge.

There were so many (often one a day in Victorian times) that a morgue was necessary. Up until fairly recently it was someone’s job to go down and check the area on a daily basis.

Because it was the closest mortuary to the Tower of London, Jacobs was taken there after the execution and that’s where the autopsy was performed.

An autopsy after a firing squad? Seems pretty pointless. Death by gunshot I'd have thought.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Slight thread drift, but I found out recently that there is a mortuary in the bottom of one of the towers of Tower Bridge.

Due to the tidal structure of the Thames most of the bodies that end up in it, wash up on the south bank, near the bridge.

There were so many (often one a day in Victorian times) that a morgue was necessary. Up until fairly recently it was someone’s job to go down and check the area on a daily basis.

Because it was the closest mortuary to the Tower of London, Jacobs was taken there after the execution and that’s where the autopsy was performed.


You got the top security job yet or you still in the gift shop?
Giz a job as the armed security....


I mean what's the worst that can happen
 

ches

LE
I was voluntold for an tri-service orienteering lark around RAF Waddington circa mid 84. After the ex, we were chatting to the blokes on the gate & were told their brownings were unloaded & the mags were in the guardroom with the rounds taped over. One of the older RAF sgts said they used to carry unloaded webleys, the rounds wrapped in that brown greasey paper stuff & kept separately. They would have to be individually cleaned up before being able to be loaded in the gatt.
 

Riga

War Hero
Off topic a bit but some POW were shot while attempting escape. This is the one that springs to mind:

(Re. the capture of U570)

'Apart from Rahmlow, U-570's officers were taken to an officers' prisoner-of-war camp at Grizedale Hall in Cumbria.[45] This was nicknamed U-boat Hotel by the British as, during the early part of the war, the majority of prisoners were naval officers rescued from sunken U-boats.[46] There, a "Court of Honour" convened by other German prisoners, including captured U-boat ace Otto Kretschmer, tried Rahmlow, in absentia, and U-570's other officers. Rahmlow and his second-in-command, Bernhard Berndt, were found "guilty of cowardice"; the other two officers were "acquitted". On the night of 18/19 October, Berndt escaped from the camp. A detachment of the Home Guard apprehended him, shooting him when he tried to escape'


.
They may have been taken to Grizedale Hall, but, it was never in Cumbria at that time!
 
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