Have the armed forces guards ever opened fire on UK soil?

Great uncle arrived in France with the Northumberland Fusiliers, April 1915
Dead six days after arriving in France at St Julien outside Ypres
Casualties for the Northumberland Fusiliers that day, 42 officers (including Brigadier General Riddell killed) and 1912 other ranks. 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th Battalions

I think that after 2 days the 7th Btn had 300 men remaining.

No known grave.
My sympathy, I can't "like" that, but that's exactly what I was talking of. A terrible thing.
 
My sympathy, I can't "like" that, but that's exactly what I was talking of. A terrible thing.

He was dead half a century before I was a gleam in my fathers eye so its only historical interest to me really.
I think after a lot of research I may have narrowed down his probable burial place

In all, the Northumberland Brigade lost two thirds of its men in a single afternoon. Almost beyond modern comprehension really
 

Awol

LE
He was dead half a century before I was a gleam in my fathers eye so its only historical interest to me really.
I think after a lot of research I may have narrowed down his probable burial place

In all, the Northumberland Brigade lost two thirds of its men in a single afternoon. Almost beyond modern comprehension really
The gas attack?
 
He was dead half a century before I was a gleam in my fathers eye so its only historical interest to me really.
I think after a lot of research I may have narrowed down his probable burial place

In all, the Northumberland Brigade lost two thirds of its men in a single afternoon. Almost beyond modern comprehension really
It’s unimaginable to think about those amount of casualties, all from one unit, all mates, 2 days after starting just a handful of men left, I don’t know how they coped with odds like that! It pains me to think of the 454 killed in Afghanistan or the 179 in Iraq, over a greater period of time (years) and from all regiments and corps. Civvies were getting nervous of the coffins coming back through Lynham and Brize. Imagine having to live through the amount of casualties from WW1 & WW2
 
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The gas attack?
Not in the gas attack itself, in the aftermath they were part of the effort to fill the hole in the line.

If I remember rightly the gas attack left a gap nearly a mile wide in the front line and all available troops were thrown in to plug it.
The Northumberland Brigade effectively marched straight through Ypres on arrival and up the line at St Julien.
 
Look, GB, please let me explain, it's been mentioned a couple of times. Wiki is a bit out, yet again.

Right, there's over 1,000 British Islands, they form the British Isles, but the biggest one is called Great Britain because it's big. Easy. So far, over? Yes Yes? Good. Wait.

All the others are part of Britain, still the British Isles, but since Roman occupation the big one has been called Great Britain an' they done maps to prove it.

It's nothing to do with our 'Greatness', no heraldry or aspirations to lead the world again: it's to do with geography, the biggest lump above the water a bit north of that France, is all. The little ones, like that Ireland, them Manx or the Isle of Wighters, are still included in Britain, the British Isles, just not that Great Britain. Politics comes after geography.
 
It’s unimaginable to think about those amount of casualties, all from one unit, all mates, 2 days after starting just a handful of men left, I don’t know how they coped with odds like that! It pains me to think of the 454 killed in Afghanistan or the 179 in Iraq, over a great period of time (years) and from all regiments and corps. Civvies were getting nervous of the coffins coming back through Lynham and Brize. Imagine having to live through the amount of casualties from WW1 & WW2
1st July 1916, 57,000 British casualties on the first day of the Somme. 20,000 killed in the first hour, and another 37,000 wounded. Thirty-seven sets of British brothers lost their lives on the battle’s first day, and one man was killed every 4.4 seconds,
 
1st July 1916, 57,000 British casualties on the first day of the Somme. 20,000 killed in the first hour, and another 37,000 wounded. Thirty-seven sets of British brothers lost their lives on the battle’s first day, and one man was killed every 4.4 seconds,
Those statistics hurt just reading them!
 

Robme

LE
Sorry to be pedantic but N.I. is not "technically" British. It f*cking well IS British.
Yep it is, it’s part of the British Isles (a geographical term as indeed is Eire), it’s not part of the United Kingdom (political entity).
So i’m British and English, whereas citizens of the North of Eire what ever Religious persuasion are British and Irish.
 
1st July 1916, 57,000 British casualties on the first day of the Somme. 20,000 killed in the first hour, and another 37,000 wounded. Thirty-seven sets of British brothers lost their lives on the battle’s first day, and one man was killed every 4.4 seconds,
Yeah, I know, my Grandfather was on the Somme on the first day, he could never talk about without tearing up
 

Awol

LE
Yeah, I know, my Grandfather was on the Somme on the first day, he could never talk about without tearing up
At the 3rd battle of Ypres 35 men died for every metre the front line advanced for 5 km. In other words, a man died for every inch of advance for three miles. And it was all lost again four months later

Modern hipster metrosexuals have nothing to moan about.
 
Yep it is, it’s part of the British Isles (a geographical term as indeed is Eire), it’s not part of the United Kingdom (political entity).
So i’m British and English, whereas citizens of the North of Eire what ever Religious persuasion are British and Irish.
You're saying part of "The United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Northern Ireland" isn't part of the United Kingdom?

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