Has anyone left and joined the fire brigade?

Discussion in 'Jobs (Discussion)' started by Mag_to_grid, Aug 1, 2007.

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  1. Just looking to see what experiences people have on here of having got out and joined the fire brigade/service. A mate of mine recently applied and got nowhere and having already been knocked back by the Police myself without even getting past the initial paper sift despite having help from two serving police officers and my OC, I am wondering if it is worth even applying to work in the emergency services seeing that I am a single ex squaddie late 20's white male.
  2. A friend of mine has had similar experences,despite being really fit,I.e black belt in 3 martial arts and quite intelligent has had no luck at all in both the Fire Brigade and Police,he joined the Prison service but left after a month after becoming hacked off at all the PC b0llocks,I should imagine the Fire Brigade and Police are also awash with simiar PC crap so it might be a blessing
  3. A friend of mine, ex-59 put forward his application, 9 months later the process started. Takes a while it would seem. 7 years later he's still with them.
  4. Fire Service is a good job, I applied and was selected for further tests from a rather large initial crowd. They tested fitness, observation skills, and grip test. They eventually sent the "unsuccessfuls" home, and sent us "maybe's" into the Gym. Work on your upper body strength, take that one on board mate. Also make sure you can manage a good bleep test result.

    You'll do acrophobia tests and other things you might or might not like before though some Officers reckon the applications are a lottery. It was a lovely job with great people, just like a big family that looks after each other. You'll soon have a nickname, just like the mob really.

    They twigged my deafness before I got very far, but I loved it. You'll probably need perfect eyesight and perfect hearing. Good luck mate.

    If you're still interested, don't go hanging round Fire Stations, they get upset. Check with job centres, online, and by phone for upcoming intakes.
    And don't canvass anyone after you've been for the Open Day, they don't like that either. if you're not asked back, accept it and try again next intake.
  5. Contrary to old popular belief, fire brigade and police forces do not look necessarily look favourably on ex services. As said, we live in a pc society and both services are looking for females and ethnic minorites in particular.

    The police is bigger than the fire brigade, so you would have more chance with them..but depends what you want as they are totally different kettles of fishes. I found even getting an application form off london fire brigade was like getting blood from a stone.

    With the police, im led to believe that even the paper sift is a big challenge as a young white male.
  6. My ears and eyesight arent exactly perfect but I think I will give it a bash anyhow and see what the outcome is. The reason I ask is that Greater Manchester are recruiting at the minute and im bored being stuck in an office all day. It would be good to feel like part of a team again.
  7. Nice one Mag...Good luck
  8. Years ago the craze was for Blaze Jumpers in places like Canada & USA for those that like a challenge. Does anyone know if this option still exists?

    First developed as a profession in the 1940s, smoke jumpers are responsible for suppressing forest fires by parachuting to remote locations.
    Once on the ground, they carry heavy supplies on their backs and hike over rough terrain to fight fires.
    Smoke jumpers pride themselves on being the first on the wildfire scene, battling harsh environments that would impede others.
    Deployed anytime anywhere, this is an extremely dangerous profession. A small shift in the wind can trap a crew in the middle of a blaze.
    Competition is high as the number of qualified applicants is greater than the number of available positions.
    This profession is seasonal, following the rise and fall of the wildfire season. Most work can be expected from mid-June to mid-September

    ....There you go....