Harry's of to sandbags ?

#2
I think once upon a time it was 5 O Levels, back when O levels actually meant something. I think the rest of the phrase was, "But if you have A-levels or a degree, so much the better"

What is the Regular Army educational requirement for Pips training?
 
#3
All candidates should hold at least 5 GCSEs, or equivalent, (grades A-C, including English and Maths, plus a science subject or foreign language) and 140 UCAS Tariff Points at A/AS Level.
This is from the Army careers website. The ucas a-level points for A-levels are as follows, AS are in brackets

A=120 (60)
B=100 (50)
C=80 (40)
D=60 (30)
E=40 (20)

So if you did 3 A-Levels and got DEE (err um like I did) you scrape through with 140. 8)
 
#4
errrr, Oh dear so what you are saying is my DEN would not have been much good.

Thank god in the old days it was more to do with your shoes, trousers and who your father was.

Besides it wasn't my fault, I was let down by my teachers/discriminated against based on my ethnicity/the cat ate my coursework.
 
#5
It doesn't really matter as long as you con a university into taking you on for a BA in needlework and basket weaving. When you get a degree that's counted as being good enough.
 
#7
Come on, give the lad a chance - at least he's got a bit of oomph about him. Mind you, I think his brother is lovely and I'm a huge fan of his dad, so I'm biased................(and he's got GREAT colour hair......!!! :wink: :lol: )
 
#9
Although the rules stated 5 GCSEs A-C and 2 A levels A-E (when I applied), around 90% of Officer Cadets at Sandhurst are graduates these days. Apparently the non-grads find it quite hard to operate in an environment where everybody is a lot older and wiser than them. I think in the olden days one needed GCSEs for a Short Service Commission, A levels for Reg C, but I may be wrong.
 
#11
Dutch_Bird said:
All candidates should hold at least 5 GCSEs, or equivalent, (grades A-C, including English and Maths, plus a science subject or foreign language) and 140 UCAS Tariff Points at A/AS Level.
This is from the Army careers website. The ucas a-level points for A-levels are as follows, AS are in brackets

A=120 (60)
B=100 (50)
C=80 (40)
D=60 (30)
E=40 (20)

So if you did 3 A-Levels and got DEE (err um like I did) you scrape through with 140. 8)
How about Highers (The Jock equivalent ?)
 
#13
hmm...one of the 'compulsory' questions at the RCB briefing is along the lines of 'have you ever had any association with illegal drugs' - wonder what he said to that! :roll:
 
V

vespa

Guest
#14
Sugar_Junkie said:
hmm...one of the 'compulsory' questions at the RCB briefing is along the lines of 'have you ever had any association with illegal drugs' - wonder what he said to that! :roll:
he he he he :lol: wish i was a fly on the wall for that one
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#15
around 90% of Officer Cadets at Sandhurst are graduates these days. Apparently the non-grads find it quite hard to operate in an environment where everybody is a lot older and wiser than them
MPUP you stroker,
In the 'old days', I attended Sandbags as a non-grad in a grad company. I was in the middle third at endex, ahead of plenty of 'older and wiser' peers. I got a staff pass at IPSE (you won't remember that), and I'm off to ACSC. No, I'm not blowing my own trumpet, but if you seriously think that a 3rd class degree in basketweaving from Spunkbridge Polyversity makes you somehow better than someone who has seen a bit of real life (like earning a living rather than talking ill-informed sh1te and supping subsidised lager at the Nelson Mandela Bar) then you can kiss my shiny white butt.
Regards,
Napier :mrgreen:
 
#17
What matters most a The Sausage Factory is a bit of military experience, Graduates have usually been to OTC which puts them ahead, whereas non-grads have to have been in the Cadets, not quite the same thing. I am a non-grad that went through the factory a couple of years ago, you aren't left behind by the tablets at Faraway Hall, but by the old OTC cadets who have done that stuff loads of times before. It is also interesting socially when your peer group is 4 years older than you. Harry has done something in the cadets (I saw the surface laid mines Eton Cadet Force left in Belize) and this will give him valuable experience later in the job. Plus he is a member of the Royal Family, if he wants to do something then let him, think of the floppies, he won't be as bad as them, and they have all graduated from the "finest military academy in the world!"
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#18
Chuzu,
Lets not forget that the Royal Family have a bit more tradition in wearing uniform than most in this country (even Edward had a go). I would imagine that most Royals are brought up on a diet of 'service to one's country', are exposed to plenty of military types, and get more than the average amount of career advice: and whilst Harry may not have much outside experience, when has that ever been a handicap to life in the Household Div?

Wee-Face (interesting nick-name that - hobby?),
What matters most at the Factory (and afterwards) is having the characteristics that your DS will have spent many hours explaining to you (moral courage, sense of duty, integrity, etc.). Military experience is, I admit, quite handy during the first 5 weeks when you are putting your webbing together and doing the first basic bits of fieldcraft. Your DS will, however, had a complete record of 'previous' and will make allowances accordingly. In some ways it can be a handicap in itself as you are no longer a blank canvas for instruction and will have (horrors!) your own ideas about things.
It could also be argued that having older peers during training is good preparation for arrival at one's Bn/Regt. I have known many officers, some good, some bad, and I can assure you that age, life experience and qualifications all come behind the individual's character in terms of importance.
 
#19
Napier,
When I referred to "non-grads" I meant those who were joining straight from school. Speaking to a crop of 2Lts who commissioned two weeks ago, they do find it hard for the reasons I outlined. Actually I do think that three years at university makes one better qualified to be an officer, for no other reason than they're three years older then if they had joined at eighteen.

Some people leave school as immature youths needing to be taught the facts of life, whilst others leave as mature adults with a great deal of awareness. Whereabouts on this scale do you think Harry lies? Besides, if you were old enough to attend IPSE (You're right, I don't have a clue what it is :D ) then as the proportion of grads has increased year on year, there would have been a much higher level of non-grads "in the olden days" and the average age would have been lower.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#20
MPUP,
A non-grad is a non-grad, regardless of age. If you meant that younger officer cadets found it hard to match their older peers, then you should have said that rather than making it an education issue. Thus the point about grads being better simply because they are older (i.e. a 22 year old having more about him/her than an 18 year old) has some merit, although is far from being universally true. Some graduate subalterns that I have known have been far less impressive than far younger 'direct entrants'. The point that I attempted to make to Wee-face is that although education or age can put some polish on one's confidence and appearance, the central pillar to being a good officer is the individual's character, and this is unlikely to change significantly in the fairly undemanding environment of the average university.
Yes there were fewer grads in the late 80s and early 90s, in fact Victory College (as it was then) hosted the SGC (Standard Graduate Course) and Old & New Colleges the SMC (Standard Military (or Simple Minds) Course. The reason that I was among my 'elders and betters' on the SGC was an early experiment to see if a cross section of non grads of varying ages and backgrounds (from 19 year-old me to ex-cpls in their late 20s) could handle the pace and match the standards of the grads. There was no significant difference between 'us' and 'them', and the existence of the current Commissioning Course shows this.
Napier
p.s. IPSE - Individual Promotion and Staff Examination. Three exams taken on JCSC: 6 points (e.g. 3 x Ds) for a promotion pass, 9 points (e.g. 3 x Cs) for a staff pass (eligible to go to Staff College).
p.p.s If Harry is like Charles he will be a good bloke, if he's like his real dad, who knows?
 

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