Harrier Crashed North of Oxford

#3
Estimated ejected at 100ft @ 45degree angle and landed 2 fields away (aircraft engineer & airfield fireman reporting)

Confirmed by him as a single seater

Quote from our good friends over at PPRUNE
 
#4
Harrier is fitted with a zero/zero seat, so the pilot can eject at any altitude or speed. Nonetheless, there are many variables, especially in an emergency, and I hope the pilot is safe and well.
 
#5
0/0 not a lot of good when you're inverted or at high angle of roll though.

Hope he's alright.

BTW does one still get to be a "Caterpillar" these days?
 
#7
Have heard pilot "safe".
And aircraft was en route Fairford to take part in RIAT.

And again... Do you still get to be a "Caterpillar"?
 
#8
According to goggle you can still get a caterpilliar badge and martin baker also has a club as well .Though walking away from the crash must be the best reward .I wonder if they sign for those things :D
 
#9
Harriers - one of the bloody things auger in every few weeks. Pegasus might be a cool idea in principle, but the damned things seem to sh*t themselves with regularity...
 
#10
I treated a crew once that had ejected. For two guys having gone through the kind of stresses their bodies (and spines in particular) had just been through they were in remarkably good shape.
 
#11
nodandawink said:
Harriers - one of the bloody things auger in every few weeks. Pegasus might be a cool idea in principle, but the damned things seem to sh*t themselves with regularity...
Actually I reckon you'd be better off keeping clear of RN Sea Kings rather than RAF Harriers.

Clicky
 
#14
RAMC_Medic said:
I treated a crew once that had ejected. For two guys having gone through the kind of stresses their bodies (and spines in particular) had just been through they were in remarkably good shape.
Depends on the age of the seat. The early ones from the 50's could mess you up (still better than perishing in a ball of flame though) but modern seats shouldn't produce any damage at all. The HArrier has a Mk 12 which is late 70s/early 80s vintage.
 
#15
Off topic, but as the pilot was uninjured:

"Graham Billinge, 58, from Langley in the New Forest, said he had been attending a training course at the pub when the crash happened."

What course is that, and can how do I get on it?
 
#16
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/5177868.stm
The aeroplane, which was flying to RAF Fairford, was due to go on display at the Royal International Air Tattoo at the Gloucestershire airfield over the weekend.
As much as I loathe the weight the press put onto 'eyewitness' remarks,
Eyewitness Matt Gray told the BBC News Website: "It seems the aircraft did a fly-by of Oxford Airport first before circling around - possibly to join the traffic pattern for landing.

Seems to me someone might have been doing something they now wish they hadn't!

Transit flight, yet hadn't enough height to make a large airfield or in fact any open field, with still 20 odd miles to run to Fairford!!!! :roll:

Lets take a look at the area around Kidlington...




Green, isn't it!!!
 
#17
How about leaving it to the BOI rather than speculate eh? A screen shot of Google Earth and a 'witness' statement in a paper aren't quite conclusive proof.

Remember, the press like to use this site for their 'anonymous MoD source' type quotes.

:roll:
 
#18
I read in The Scum today that the Harrier hit a Police car on its way down and the copper only just got out.
 
#19
SilsoeSid said:
Seems to me someone might have been doing something they now wish they hadn't!
What, like flying a single engined aircraft with the gliding characteristics of a block of concrete?
As The Helpful Stacker says, leave it to the BOI.
 
#20
I'd echo the comments re: awaiting the board of inquiry.

But - if you want an aircraft with even worse gliding characteristics - look no further than the Lightning! Key difference being that the operating altitude of our double Avon equipped piece of 1950's technology (still classified max ceiling (?), multiple time to altitude records, alleged shoot down ability of all sorts of high altitude USAAF exotica) is rather different from the Harriers, who are the guys scaring the sheep down at @200m and below. How much time does that give the pilot when things go wrong?
 

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