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Harrier 809

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Harrier 809 by Rowland White

This superb book describes how 809 Squadron (Sea Harrier) was reformed as an emergency measure in April 1982 at the start of the Falklands War. One RN senior pilot was tasked with finding enough serviceable aircraft and sufficiently qualified pilots (some on exchange in far-flung places) to cover attrition in 800 and 801 Squadrons during the war. In the event, 809 was formed, trained and transported south on the MV Atlantic Conveyor ready to start carrier-based front-line combat by mid May.

This is a large volume; packed with information both technical, human and political and is complete with plenty of colour photographs - a few unseen until now - and some decent maps. Personal and official accounts of air combat, bombing and missile attacks and tactics are plentiful, as are fine details of the operations of all three UK Forces.

Despite the vast amount of information as described, there are bonuses in the form of intelligence and diplomatic events of the time - which reveal quite a few surprises particularly about our allies and enemies during the war!

This book is beautifully researched and written - a long and drawn-out review simply could not do it justice. A fitting tribute to the men, aircraft and ships involved and, in my opinion, is a 'must-read'. Rating: 5/5
 

syrup

LE
Harrier 809 by Rowland White

This superb book describes how 809 Squadron (Sea Harrier) was reformed as an emergency measure in April 1982 at the start of the Falklands War. One RN senior pilot was tasked with finding enough serviceable aircraft and sufficiently qualified pilots (some on exchange in far-flung places) to cover attrition in 800 and 801 Squadrons during the war. In the event, 809 was formed, trained and transported south on the MV Atlantic Conveyor ready to start carrier-based front-line combat by mid May.

This is a large volume; packed with information both technical, human and political and is complete with plenty of colour photographs - a few unseen until now - and some decent maps. Personal and official accounts of air combat, bombing and missile attacks and tactics are plentiful, as are fine details of the operations of all three UK Forces.

Despite the vast amount of information as described, there are bonuses in the form of intelligence and diplomatic events of the time - which reveal quite a few surprises particularly about our allies and enemies during the war!

This book is beautifully researched and written - a long and drawn-out review simply could not do it justice. A fitting tribute to the men, aircraft and ships involved and, in my opinion, is a 'must-read'. Rating: 5/5

Great review thanks it's already sitting in the basket at Amazon.

I worked with a few guys at RAF Wittering who had been on the Conveyor when she got hit.
One of the Chiefs had a fancy warm weather suit he wore on the line.
He'd been given it after all his stuff went down with the ship.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Great review thanks it's already sitting in the basket at Amazon.

I worked with a few guys at RAF Wittering who had bene on the Conveyor when she got hit.
One of the Chiefs had a fancy warm weather suit he wore on the line.
He'd been given it after all his stuff went down with the ship.
Many thanks, a book that was a pleasure to read and which I'm sure you will enjoy! Cheers...
 
A huge amount of work to get 809 NAS ready for war was done by the late Lt Cdr Taylor Scott. As John Farley of BAe said:

If there was one person that deserves a medal for the way the Sea Harrier was operated in the Falklands .. it's Taylor, because he made sure that what was in that cockpit was what the naval pilots needed to do their job

— John Farley
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
A huge amount of work to get 809 NAS ready for war was done by the late Lt Cdr Taylor Scott. As John Farley of BAe said:

If there was one person that deserves a medal for the way the Sea Harrier was operated in the Falklands .. it's Taylor, because he made sure that what was in that cockpit was what the naval pilots needed to do their job

— John Farley
Yes, indeed and a worthy comment. That's always a problem with books as good as this, in that you can't include everyone and everything. Cheers...
 
Yes, indeed and a worthy comment. That's always a problem with books as good as this, in that you can't include everyone and everything. Cheers...
Rowland White, along with Mike Rossiter, is one of my favorite authors on stuff like this. They seem to make real effort to get it right and to include as much as possible.

Looks like Harrier 809 is next on my list.
 
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