Hardly any birds?

tiv

War Hero
I’ve noticed more woodpeckers in the last week or so than I’ve heard before. Not sure if it’s just less background noise.
Since we moved here we have had regular visits from Green Woodpeckers and the odd Greater Spotted. There is a Greater Spotted that uses a BT joint box to drum on making a lot of noise in the process!
Last year a pair of Greens mated on our lawn.

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Woodies-Mating.jpg


Woodie-Pole.jpg
 
I'm not sure what it's like where you live, but I've noticed that there's hardly any birds flying about compared to normal at this time of year. I'm not one for conspiracy theories or mumbo jumbo - but usually at this time of year I sea and hear lot more than I'm seeing, especially smaller birds.

Maybe it's just me - but what's it like where you live, have you noticed the same?
You can blame (S)Packham as he managed to stop corvid (not covid) control last year , consequently the countryside is overrun with crows and magpies both of which prey on small/song birds and their eggs/young.
 
You can blame (S)Packham as he managed to stop corvid (not covid) control last year , consequently the countryside is overrun with crows and magpies both of which prey on small/song birds and their eggs/young.
OK, this maybe why I’m not seeing any difference here in Perthshire. That stupidity didn’t affect Scotland. Mind you, there is no shortage of crows, jackdaws or magpies round here.
 
Dozens and Dozens of small song birds in my garden. It's like a horror film when I go out to feed them on a morning!

We even have a Robin Red Breast that frequents our garden. Admittedly I see very few crows or magpies, maybe that is why.
 
I'm not sure what it's like where you live, but I've noticed that there's hardly any birds flying about compared to normal at this time of year. I'm not one for conspiracy theories or mumbo jumbo - but usually at this time of year I sea and hear lot more than I'm seeing, especially smaller birds.

Maybe it's just me - but what's it like where you live, have you noticed the same?
they've been grounded by CORVID virus

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Found a small one deed in the garden..................picked it up on a shove.................l and gave it a final flight as I hoisted it over the wall into the neigbour's place................. (currently empty). Thoughtful
 

Issi

War Hero
Here's hoping that the virus will keep those European hunters indoors, while the migrants (feathered) return.

I can kind of see the appeal of shooting geese, ducks, grouse etc for the pot. But I'm slightly baffled why people would shoot warblers, thrushes etc.
 

Union Jack

Old-Salt
Plenty of songbirds today, especially blackbirds, singing away as I write, both green and greater spotted woodpeckers, mallard on the river, buzzards soaring overhead earlier, plus jackdaws, magpies, jays, and a pair of ravens, so does that constitute a plethora of corvids....?:eek:

Jack
 

Niamac

GCM
When we were out hill walking we saw a peregrine taking on a buzzard; obviously some sort of dispute over territory. It was like watching a Messerschmidt and a Flying Fortress and it lasted for about 10 minutes until the peregrine got fed up (or tired) and left.
 
We've got our usual pheasant who crosses (what used to be pre-COVID19) a main road to get to our front garden - we are surrounded by farms and the local gamekeeper breeds pheasants for shoots and some venture up to our area. We have a number of blackbirds both front and back along with spadgers, blue tits, great tits, dunnocks, a few cheeky robins and an occasional song thrush, again front and back.

In the back garden we are regularly visited by a pair of pink legged partridge (which introduce us to their offspring every year) and an occasional woodpecker. For the last few days we've been feeding a Mallard pair who also come every year to mate. We were introduced to their offspring a couple of years ago, hopefully with the reduced road traffic that will happen again.

We also have a couple of magpies (I thought we could shoot them as they are vermin?), pigeons and any number of ring necked doves. We also have a barn owl or two which hunt locally, together with a brown owl and a little owl. The raptors consist of a family of sparrowhawks and last year we clocked a buzzard.

The spadgers really raise their voices when I go out to fill the feeders and this in turn tells all the other birds that "Dave's here with the food, everyone". I think I'm a little bit of a celebrity in the local bird world (some hope!!).
 
I'm not sure cats are the worst culprits... ours much prefer mice, and I often look out of our kitchen, and there's loads of birds, happily rooting about 4 ft away from sun- bathing cats.
 

Union Jack

Old-Salt
The spadgers really raise their voices when I go out to fill the feeders and this in turn tells all the other birds that "Dave's here with the food, everyone". I think I'm a little bit of a celebrity in the local bird world (some hope!!).
Spadgers? Spadgers? Do you mean speugs? :rolleyes:
 
This usually happens at this time of year. Most native overwintering species will have paired off and be nest building or sat on eggs around now, so you will see a lot less around. Once the chicks have hatched there will be a lot more frantic activity to get the food in and even more once they have fledged.
Given the mild winter there may be a lot more made it through than usual. Not sure just how the multiple February storms would have affected numbers in some areas though.
No shortage of birds around me (I live next to a huge park) and went for a walk around it last night in the twilight bird song. It was very nice and not a soul around.
Went for a bike ride along the Ribble Link (links the Lancaster canal to the river Ribble) and Lancaster canal at lunch and it was full of bird life. Plenty of woodpeckers hammering away on tree trunks as well, which is always nice to hear.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I dunno what the gestation period is for a blackbird, but this evening I was sat eating dinner and couple I mentioned upthread started getting it on on the garden wall. There'll be more when the eggs hatch. 64 years old and before today I can't remember ever seeing birds at it.

That's two blackbirds getting jiggy, not two black birds getting jiggy. Okay?
 
I'm not sure cats are the worst culprits... ours much prefer mice, and I often look out of our kitchen, and there's loads of birds, happily rooting about 4 ft away from sun- bathing cats.
Seagulls are relentless predators of smaller birds and their nests/eggs.
since I started home working last year, I’ve waged a bit of a war on the shitehawks using a high powered laser pointer. They’ve got the hint and stopped hanging about - noticeably more birds now to be seen. The Magpies are a good tripwire alarm, any gulls, they raise hell.
 
Plenty fecking magpies and wood pigeons here who like causing a ruckus. Agree about the smaller birds who seem to be in isolation also.
Got loads here , strange as the last yeas we had loads of bloody magpies, wish I had an air rifle , loads of pigeons but for the last 2 weeks more than normal smaller birds. Some I have not ever seen before, green finch, never seen in the garden before.
 
Seagulls are relentless predators of smaller birds and their nests/eggs.
since I started home working last year, I’ve waged a bit of a war on the shitehawks using a high powered laser pointer. They’ve got the hint and stopped hanging about - noticeably more birds now to be seen. The Magpies are a good tripwire alarm, any gulls, they raise hell.
‘Never thought of that for the magpies. What type of laser?
 

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