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Hard Drive died ?????

#1
Greetings oh computer ninjas, my external hard drive has seemingly given up the ghost, it is not recognizable by any PC I plug it into, I have let a colleague look at it and his technical description was "its F**ked" (cheers for that). Now I'm resigned to the fact I will have to buy a new one, however, can I get the info from the old one in any way ?????? Merci buckets :)
 

FrosteeMARIA

LE
Gallery Guru
#3
Pandora data recovery worked for me - same prob. (It's also freeware!)
You might also want to check the power supply to ext HDD- is it usb powered or mains?
 
#4
You could try a recovery utility to analyse the drive, it may not be the drive have you tried putting it in to another casing?
 
#5
As above, check it's getting power.

After that I'd be tempted to carefully extract the drive from it's enclosure and mount it in a PC before attempting data recovery.

On the other hand... If there's anything really valuable on there that you need to recover, valuable as in "will send to data recovery specialist, prices start at a bag of sand and rise rapidly" then do bugger all with it. The less you ballix about with it the easier (and cheaper) the professional recovery will be.
 

FrosteeMARIA

LE
Gallery Guru
#14
If PC still recognises there is a USB device there, then software recovery should do the trick. Only downside is that recovered files will sometimes be renamed as file000001, and so on.
 
#16
Take it to a shop and they may be able to get the stuff off it. Not always though, my hard drive buggered up last year without warning and because I was a moron and hadn't backed anything up I lost around 10 years worth of irreplaceable photos which I was absolutely gutted about, as well as ridiculous amounts of music.
 
#18
Ive got it backed up on another drive (but it's in UK and I'm in Morocco till end of Dec) however I wanted to use this one boo hoo
Break the case open, mount the drive in a desktop PC. If you can see the files, you can transfer them off. If you can't see the files or drive, then it's £799 from Kroll Ontrack plus a spare blank drive for them to put the stuff on.

I'd wager the drive was in permanent use as an external drive; they aren't designed to cope with the heat of being connected for long periods. Had a customer who had ten years' worth of (nicked) downloaded music on it, and had only the one drive, which he used in a very hot nightclub, attached to his laptop. I told him to smash it up and get out his backup drive. No backup drive, Sir? Oh dear.....
 
#19
Break the case open, mount the drive in a desktop PC. If you can see the files, you can transfer them off. If you can't see the files or drive, then it's £799 from Kroll Ontrack plus a spare blank drive for them to put the stuff on.

I'd wager the drive was in permanent use as an external drive; they aren't designed to cope with the heat of being connected for long periods. Had a customer who had ten years' worth of (nicked) downloaded music on it, and had only the one drive, which he used in a very hot nightclub, attached to his laptop. I told him to smash it up and get out his backup drive. No backup drive, Sir? Oh dear.....
Mine has been used for DJ purposes for the last 5 years or so
 
#20
On the other hand... If there's anything really valuable on there that you need to recover, valuable as in "will send to data recovery specialist, prices start at a bag of sand and rise rapidly" then do bugger all with it. The less you ballix about with it the easier (and cheaper) the professional recovery will be.
Seems like a good point to talk about the world of data recovery. My experience of this is entirely limited to one incident but one that could have worked out very badly indeed.

I had two identical multi-Gb drives. Both went 'phut' at different times. First one, no dramas as it was properly backed up and only being used as a scratch disk it was relegated to the 'spare parts' bench and forgotten. The backup routine for the second one, however, somehow got corrupted.

Having tried several DIY software solutions, I eventually accepted defeat, searched for a recovery specialist and found Rapid Data Recovery. Seemed okay.

I boxed the drive up together with a new one (onto which the data was to be recovered) and dropped them off at the London address but was struck by the fact that the building seemed to contain nothing but a collection of small companies and was clearly no more than a 'box drop' location for Rapid Data. Hmm. Was that the whiff of the Emperor's favourite aftershave?

Back at the office, the niggling doubt continued. A further search revealed that Rapid were in fact part of Fields Data Recovery. Well, okay, but why the two identities?

After a bit more googling I discovered this, this and then this. Unfortunately, the last site seems to have had its wings clipped pending legal action by Fields.

After some time, I received a text file containing the directory listing of the fritzed hard drive. And a mysteriously higher recovery estimate than the one first advertised. Alarm bells were now clanging good & proper, but the Emperor's sniggers were quickly silenced when I spotted that I had in fact sent them the wrong fritzed drive. All I had to do was get the new drive back off them and I was in the clear. One cock & bull story about needing it back for a video job (plus a non-negotiable £35 courier fee) and the situation was retrieved.

Ha! Considering how expensive that little error could have become, it was time for Emperor Mong to eat facepalm.

You are, of course, free to make up your own minds about them, but the events described in the scam alerts were exactly the same as those that happened to me until I pulled the plug.

I then did some much more careful searching and discovered these fellas who do lots of work for the MoD and get five out of five 'stickybombs' for both value and customer service.

Here endeth the lesson.

Caveat emptor, Amen.
 

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