Happy Birthday Singapore

probably less than 20 yards from my front door, are there several times. There was a nice bar on the opposite corner of Lau Pa Sat, on the corner of Cross St and Shenton Way which was nice for Sunday early doors beers and watching the world go by
Loved the hawker centres. Fried mee for lunch, proper steamed buns with char siew, real spring rolls the size of a rolled table napkin , then there was nasi lemak, nasi goreng, umpteen curries .....arrrgghhh.
Made every takeaway and restaurant in the UK tasteless and overpriced.
 

KnockKnock

Old-Salt
Still lots of food halls around Singapore, Lau Pa Sat is probably the one you are thinking of. Photo taken in 2018 from my apartment window. The road at the side, Boon Tat Street, was cordoned off in the evenings and the hut structures used as BBQ's serving satay, lamb, prawn and chicken washed down with jugs of beer.

View attachment 496630
That's it, I went there in 1956 for nasi goreng and Anchor beer, took my wife there again in 2009 for a similar dish. !n 1955 the nasi was a plate full of rice and prawns etc without the salad stuff now days served alongside. Thanks very much for the photo and have a look for the old 15 storey Bank building, now 'Escott' luxury apartments tucked up against a modern tower.
 

merchantman

War Hero
A little further up the road I think, here's one pick from the net which says from 1970 showing the old post office, now Fullerton Hotel, Clifford pier, now Fullerton Bay Hotel and down Shenton Way and passed Lau Pa Sat with what was to be chateau merchantman opposite, then just a field

Collyer Quay 1970.jpg
 

KnockKnock

Old-Salt
A little further up the road I think, here's one pick from the net which says from 1970 showing the old post office, now Fullerton Hotel, Clifford pier, now Fullerton Bay Hotel and down Shenton Way and passed Lau Pa Sat with what was to be chateau merchantman opposite, then just a field

View attachment 496752
Great shot.....Now just on that 1st point in the river (centre of Pic) behind the Army and Navy store, I have included on post 15, a pic I took from the viewpoint standing on bridge, showing some ways of locals living in 1956.
Out of view is the Cathy Building, right side of pic, also Britannia Club, Raffles Hotel and cinema.
 
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In 1956 the only shop with air conditioning (other than an expensive hotel I guess) was as I remember, the Singapore Cold Store, where they had the best tasting orange juice in small bottles, a great place to cool off.
Was this 'Robinsons'? I was in Singapore as an RAF pads brat from February 1962 until August 1964. I remember that was the only place in Singapore with air conditioning. It was the only place in Singapore I ever saw with European women working in the shop although the majority were Chinese girls.
 
So do the Penangese, Chinese, Malay or Indian, love the way "hanky-panky" has become part of their languages.
Penang, Singapore and Malacca were the original Federal Straits Colonies run directly by a British Governor as opposed to a Malay King advised by a British Resident in the Unfederated States. The Chinese Perankan inhabitants of the Straits Colonies preceded the British by a few hundred years and had blended in with the Malay culture. They were very much the middle class of the time with their distinct culture. During Colonial times they were known as the 'Queens Chinese' due to their love of all things English especially Pears soap. This is what gives Singapore and Penang its unique heritage compared to somewhere like Hong Kong.
 

ROMFT

Old-Salt
And as i understand it, came close to also separating from Malaysia, the decision not to do so regretted by more than a few of the locals.
 
Was this 'Robinsons'? I was in Singapore as an RAF pads brat from February 1962 until August 1964. I remember that was the only place in Singapore with air conditioning. It was the only place in Singapore I ever saw with European women working in the shop although the majority were Chinese girls.
RAF Changi cinema was air conditioned.
 

KnockKnock

Old-Salt
Penang, Singapore and Malacca were the original Federal Straits Colonies run directly by a British Governor as opposed to a Malay King advised by a British Resident in the Unfederated States. The Chinese Perankan inhabitants of the Straits Colonies preceded the British by a few hundred years and had blended in with the Malay culture. They were very much the middle class of the time with their distinct culture. During Colonial times they were known as the 'Queens Chinese' due to their love of all things English especially Pears soap. This is what gives Singapore and Penang its unique heritage compared to somewhere like Hong Kong.
Strange,...17 months active service in Malaya 1955/6, with visits to Penang, and I never ever heard of 'Queens Chinese' and only became aware of Peranakan, when we later visited Singapore 2009, and found the small Peranakan Museum, close to the Masonic Hall. An enchanting display of Peranakan music and songs, in the museum, was the highlight of our visit.
 
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And as i understand it, came close to also separating from Malaysia, the decision not to do so regretted by more than a few of the locals.
Including a lot of the local Malays who don't see eye to eye with the mainland
 
Strange,...17 months active service in Malaya 1955/6, with visits to Penang, and I never ever heard of 'Queens Chinese' and only became aware of Peranakan, when we later visited Singapore 2009, and found the small Peranakan Museum, close to the Masonic Hall. An enchanting display of Peranakan music and songs, in the museum, was the highlight of our visit.
I think the term was more used in the Victorian and Edwardian era.
 

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