Happy Birthday NHS!

#1
71 years ago on the 5th July 1948 people in the UK woke up to a National Health Service.

Mark Thomas did a brilliant show last year celebrating the NHS. It is well worth seeking out or reading the script.

I love the NHS and can not see a UK every not having a universal healthcare system.
Expensive? Yes and no, depending on perspective.
Can it be better run? Undoubtedly.
Will any future governments create another life changing policy in our life time?


70 Years of the NHS: The Story of Our Lives

A brief history of the NHS

In celebration I will make my wife (nurse) a cup of tea. :0)
 
#2
Both the Mrs and me work for the NHS, and at the moment it's at breaking point. A career in the NHS needs to be seen as worthwhile by school leavers, sadly it's not.

It needs a huge overhaul, layers of bureaucracy need to be peeled away, bring back ward matrons, people who CARE about the patients , not some faceless bureaucrat sat in an office making potentially life and death decisions.

Open the Community hospitals back up for post OP Rehabilitation, that would stop ambulances being stacked outside A&E for hours on end due to a shortage of beds.


And breathe, rant over.
 
#3
So far every government since Thatcher has dodge the elephant in the room. The NHS is something to be very proud of, a national treasure, but it needs restructuring and bureaucracy greatly reduced and wages increased. Working conditions need to be improved as well, this might reduce the amount of staff leaving the NHS.
 
#4
I worked for the NHS in the Microbiology and Clinical Chemistry departments for 42 years. In the beginning it was an interesting, fulfilling job, but leading up to my retirement the only time I enjoyed work was working by myself in a room full of machines doing on-call. through the night. The job had descended into colleagues who had only self-aggrandisement in their sights, and were prepared to sell their colleagues down the river to climb the greasy pole. The amount of paperwork (and its computer equivalent) had become oppressive. I grew sick of signing something to say that I had read something else. I used to think "this is not the job I signed up for" constantly. Always workload increasing and fewer workers. The proliferation of managers was another problem, too many chiefs and not enough Indians. Once I realised I couldn't stand 90% of my colleagues (who very likely hated me as well) retirement beckoned. Good luck to any young folk entering the NHS laboratory service now, you have my sympathy.
 
#6
Anyone who has tried restructuring or changing even small things seems to have been met with massive resistance. It's too big to fail but has gathered too much momentum to change. Centralising services may work on a power point presentation but it doesn't factor in reality. The German system seems better. Why? What are they doing differently?

Multinational Comparisons of Health Systems Data, 2018 | Commonwealth Fund
 

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#7
I worked for the NHS in the Microbiology and Clinical Chemistry departments for 42 years. In the beginning it was an interesting, fulfilling job, but leading up to my retirement the only time I enjoyed work was working by myself in a room full of machines doing on-call. through the night. The job had descended into colleagues who had only self-aggrandisement in their sights, and were prepared to sell their colleagues down the river to climb the greasy pole. The amount of paperwork (and its computer equivalent) had become oppressive. I grew sick of signing something to say that I had read something else. I used to think "this is not the job I signed up for" constantly. Always workload increasing and fewer workers. The proliferation of managers was another problem, too many chiefs and not enough Indians. Once I realised I couldn't stand 90% of my colleagues (who very likely hated me as well) retirement beckoned. Good luck to any young folk entering the NHS laboratory service now, you have my sympathy.
Have a bucket full of likes. My sentiments exactly. I'm 31 years this week in the NHS - sadly due to the changes in pension rules I've another ten years or so go yet before retirement. UKAS is a monster that will never be satisfied. Best wishes from a Haematologist.

Pv
 
#8
Mrs is a senior nurse/ head of department in her field type bod.

She can't wait to retire and stick two fingers up to the lot off them.
 
#9
So far every government since Thatcher has dodge the elephant in the room. The NHS is something to be very proud of, a national treasure, but it needs restructuring and bureaucracy greatly reduced and wages increased. Working conditions need to be improved as well, this might reduce the amount of staff leaving the NHS.
Agreed, it needs a massive overhaul, but where we going to get the cash from? Restructuring in any business isn't cheap, let alone a £114.6bn national organisation.

Happy bday though.
 
#10
Well my younger sister works for the NHS after working in the health private sector for over 15 years. She's not looked back even if it is NHS Scotland trust.

I've friends in the NHS whom obviously have mixed views on how it operates however personally I've nothing but admiration for one to one dealing over the years & I wish the NHS happy birthday.


Sent from my SM-T555 using Tapatalk
 
#12
I worked for the NHS in the Microbiology and Clinical Chemistry departments for 42 years. In the beginning it was an interesting, fulfilling job, but leading up to my retirement the only time I enjoyed work was working by myself in a room full of machines doing on-call. through the night. The job had descended into colleagues who had only self-aggrandisement in their sights, and were prepared to sell their colleagues down the river to climb the greasy pole. The amount of paperwork (and its computer equivalent) had become oppressive. I grew sick of signing something to say that I had read something else. I used to think "this is not the job I signed up for" constantly. Always workload increasing and fewer workers. The proliferation of managers was another problem, too many chiefs and not enough Indians. Once I realised I couldn't stand 90% of my colleagues (who very likely hated me as well) retirement beckoned. Good luck to any young folk entering the NHS laboratory service now, you have my sympathy.
That has become SOP in many places.
I was constantly picked up signing the slip without reading the paper.
I don't do that, i'll probably never do that and if I ever do that I will then read the SOP wasn't good enough for them.
It was for me so I continued.
 
#13
That has become SOP in many places.
I was constantly picked up signing the slip without reading the paper.
I don't do that, i'll probably never do that and if I ever do that I will then read the SOP wasn't good enough for them.
It was for me so I continued.
On the lab intranet there was a folder containing every sop for every department. Anything I was unsure about, I could find in seconds
 
#16
I’d say ‘happy birthday NHS’, but while it’s a birthday, it’s far from happy for many of the staff.

Working for the NHS these days is an exercise in managing frustration, fatigue and demoralisation.

I work in acute medicine and the staff shortages are grim indeed, where on any given day you're managing too many patients to be able to provide the level of care that’s required, because there aren’t enough staff.

Whenever we’re fully staffed for a shift it’s bliss and I can provide the service I should, but it’s rare, with staff constantly being moved to fill gaps elsewhere in the hospital, which in itself doesn’t have enough beds because no one can be moved to a community hospital for recuperation, because the community hospitals aren’t there anymore.

IMO the worst thing and biggest impediment on the NHS are not those that work for it, who for the most part are dedicated, caring and trying really hard to provide the level of service that we should have, (at least the clinical staff are).

However, the politicians that control the purse-strings are almost without exception tin-eared ideologues who provide little but interference, which wouldn’t be bad if that interference was evidence based, but so far as I’m aware, never is.

Ever since the instigation of the NHS, or at least certainly in my lifetime, the NHS has been a toy for successive governments and ministers to **** around with, based on their ideology and dogma, but never on evidence.

For example, the Health and Social Care Act 2014 was a complete top-to-toe restructuring of the NHS, but while it cost a fortune to implement (that’s your tax money folks) and was incredibly disruptive, outside of the soundbites had nothing to do with improving patient care and unsurprisingly has provided zero content.

There are a lot of things that need to be addressed if the NHS is to survive, but for Gods sake keep the politicians away from it.

IMO if the ideological interference remains unchecked, the NHS will be gone within another couple of decades, possibly sooner if we get another **** like Jeremy Hunt, who had an agenda that had nothing to do with patient care or improving the service.



Edited for that grammer thingy.
 
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#17
I worked for the NHS in the Microbiology and Clinical Chemistry departments for 42 years. In the beginning it was an interesting, fulfilling job, but leading up to my retirement the only time I enjoyed work was working by myself in a room full of machines doing on-call. through the night. The job had descended into colleagues who had only self-aggrandisement in their sights, and were prepared to sell their colleagues down the river to climb the greasy pole. The amount of paperwork (and its computer equivalent) had become oppressive. I grew sick of signing something to say that I had read something else. I used to think "this is not the job I signed up for" constantly. Always workload increasing and fewer workers. The proliferation of managers was another problem, too many chiefs and not enough Indians. Once I realised I couldn't stand 90% of my colleagues (who very likely hated me as well) retirement beckoned. Good luck to any young folk entering the NHS laboratory service now, you have my sympathy.
That’s working for the government for you. Enjoy your retirement.
 
#19
Working for the NHS these days is an exercise in managing frustration, fatigue and demoralisation.
I think you sum it up very nicely.
 
#20
Both the Mrs and me work for the NHS, and at the moment it's at breaking point. A career in the NHS needs to be seen as worthwhile by school leavers, sadly it's not.

It needs a huge overhaul, layers of bureaucracy need to be peeled away, bring back ward matrons, people who CARE about the patients , not some faceless bureaucrat sat in an office making potentially life and death decisions.

Open the Community hospitals back up for post OP Rehabilitation, that would stop ambulances being stacked outside A&E for hours on end due to a shortage of beds.


And breathe, rant over.
Accountability?
Doing things at the lowest possible level?

It will never catch on.

The Community Hospitals not only provided beds for recovery post operation, but were places GPs could send vulnerable patients too when needed without using acute beds.

I worked for the NHS in the Microbiology and Clinical Chemistry departments for 42 years. In the beginning it was an interesting, fulfilling job, but leading up to my retirement the only time I enjoyed work was working by myself in a room full of machines doing on-call. through the night. The job had descended into colleagues who had only self-aggrandisement in their sights, and were prepared to sell their colleagues down the river to climb the greasy pole. The amount of paperwork (and its computer equivalent) had become oppressive. I grew sick of signing something to say that I had read something else. I used to think "this is not the job I signed up for" constantly. Always workload increasing and fewer workers. The proliferation of managers was another problem, too many chiefs and not enough Indians. Once I realised I couldn't stand 90% of my colleagues (who very likely hated me as well) retirement beckoned. Good luck to any young folk entering the NHS laboratory service now, you have my sympathy.
Not unique to the NHS though - back stabbing and kissing the boss' arse seems to be the way to the top anywhere.

I saw a NHS careers brochure yesterday - and it made the appalling suggestion that someone could be a Clinical Manager without being a Clinician of any sort.
 
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