Hangers?

#1
Inspired by AlienFTM's post here http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums/viewtopic/t=121326.html and without trying to sound incredibly dull and boring........yeah, yeah I know :roll: and before any smart alec asks why is the Tank Park called the Tank Park?.......................Why are hangers called hangers?

If you know what I mean :?
 
#2
I should think it's because earlier "lighter than air" craft had to be hung up for maintenance and storage. Balloons, airships and so on.

Might be wrong though.
 
#5
#6
They used to be called TANKDROMES
 
#7
The_Snail said:
TheBigUn said:
Inspired by AlienFTM's post here http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums/viewtopic/t=121326.html and without trying to sound incredibly dull and boring........yeah, yeah I know :roll: and before any smart alec asks why is the Tank Park called the Tank Park?.......................Why are hangers called hangers?

If you know what I mean :?
Did you mean Hangars or Hangers?

Took me ages to google that...... :?
Yeah, yeah, I know that aircraft park in hangars but why do people in the RAC fraternity call the place were tanks etc are parked hangers/hangars?

Slug, have another glass of wine and don't worry about PT tomorrow! :wink:
 
#8
tropper66 said:
They used to be called TANKDROMES

soz Tropp slight correction mate
TANKODROMES - came about - the same time as the RFC Aerodromes? Some bright spark will have thought "WTF do we call a collection area for yet another war winning wonder weapon where there's been nothing before?"
Then - later even though the aircraft connection was still tenuous...........
I would suggest that Hangar does emanate from the fact that the nearest comparable large building is an Aircraft Hangar..................couldn't really call them Tank houses, Tank warehouses or Tank Garages.........just wouldn't work methinks.
Tank Park? The area between the Hangars where you park Tanks, as in Car Park..............simply a vehicle collecting/parking area!!

WTF am I going on about? It's just obvious isn't it?
 
#9
Not to be confused with hanger.
A hangar is an enclosed structure to hold aircraft in protective storage. Most hangars are built of metal, but wood and concrete are other materials used. The word hangar comes from a northern French dialect, and means "cattle pen."

Well,we know origin of 'Hangar' now
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#10
brownhat said:
Not to be confused with hanger.
A hangar is an enclosed structure to hold aircraft in protective storage. Most hangars are built of metal, but wood and concrete are other materials used. The word hangar comes from a northern French dialect, and means "cattle pen."

Well,we know origin of 'Hangar' now
I too googled this - a few seconds before I found you had already copied the Wiki entry. To say I am surprised to find the word is French is understating it. I naturally assumed that its origin was similar to that of Sangar.

(Ibid:)
Sangar is a small temporary fortified position with a breastwork originally of stone now built of sandbags and similar materials. The term was originally used by the British Indian Army to describe a small temporary fortified positions on the North West Frontier and in Afghanistan, and is still frequently used by the British Army. Sangar means "barricade" in Persian.
 
#11
brownhat said:
Not to be confused with hanger.
A hangar is an enclosed structure to hold aircraft in protective storage. Most hangars are built of metal, but wood and concrete are other materials used. The word hangar comes from a northern French dialect, and means "cattle pen."

Well,we know origin of 'Hangar' now
:eek: :(
If this is indeed true then especially today of all days I feel I must wash my mouth out with bleach as a pennance for every time I uttered the words "Reverse it back in the Hang*r" and I feel soiled that I ever entered a stinking Fr*nch Hang*r-- I am trully devastated and may sue for the trauma 8O
 
#12
three3alpha said:
brownhat said:
Not to be confused with hanger.
A hangar is an enclosed structure to hold aircraft in protective storage. Most hangars are built of metal, but wood and concrete are other materials used. The word hangar comes from a northern French dialect, and means "cattle pen."

Well,we know origin of 'Hangar' now
:eek: :(
If this is indeed true then especially today of all days I feel I must wash my mouth out with bleach as a pennance for every time I uttered the words "Reverse it back in the Hang*r" and I feel soiled that I ever entered a stinking Fr*nch Hang*r-- I am trully devastated and may sue for the trauma 8O
But in the highly unlikely occurence of reversing through back of hangar,not that it ever happened of course,well,this info might help dull the pain.
 
#14
From midnight@wiki.tw@ts

Tankpark-where young soldiers play on great big bits of moveable metel and practice the `tankpark shuffle´ie beret on back of head,hands in pockets with both toe and heel of the boot connecting with the ground,(not to be confused with marching).Perfection comes with having two sets of keys which suddenly appear when the RSM tells you gently to ´Get yer `F***** Hands out of yer F****** Pockets!!´

CNUT!!
 
#15
midnight said:
From midnight@wiki.tw@ts

Tankpark-where young soldiers play on great big bits of moveable metel and practice the `tankpark shuffle´ie beret on back of head,hands in pockets with both toe and heel of the boot connecting with the ground,(not to be confused with marching).Perfection comes with having two sets of keys which suddenly appear when the RSM tells you gently to ´Get yer `F***** Hands out of yer F****** Pockets!!´

CNUT!!
So why did we call exercise's Scheme's :?
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#16
Are they not normally referred-to as 'sheds'?

Or is that word used to refer to those vehicles held within?
 
#18
Always assumed it was taken from the phrase Scheme of Maneuver?

:?
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
swatrfc Weapons, Equipment & Rations 8
E The Intelligence Cell 15

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads