Hand Signals

Discussion in 'Infantry' started by Rifle-Green-Sex-Machine, Jun 14, 2005.

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  1. I was watching the Peacemaker with George Clooney and noticed that he gave the raised clenched fist signal when he wanted everyone to stop. In my day it meant snap ambush. What is the correct signal?
     
  2. I might be wrong but isn't the sign for snap ambush, as if you were snapping something? In my defence I am a nurse!

    S-D
     
  3. To stop? Right hand up in the air, palm forwards, roughly shoulder height.

    Raised clenched fist= FSG come forward
     
  4. Yanks have different hand signals. We use open hand for stop.
     
  5. FSG was out of style during the 90's, we had handed back our Jimpies. So what is snap ambush then?
     
  6. Either a 'snapping' motion followed by a brecon point, or a spread hand over the face followed by brecon point.

    I've seen both used.
     
  7. so is the clenched fist still used for FSG then?
     
  8. The snapping motion as far as I'm concerned is a bit arrse seeing as the only type of ambush you're going to perform ad hoc is a snap ambush.

    Therefore surely the spread hand over the face followed by Warminster chop suffices without the requirement to take ones hand off the rifle to preform a "twig snapping motion".

    Seems logical to me....
     
  9. Big fish, little fish cardboard box!
     
  10. Cutaway

    Cutaway LE Reviewer

    Yes.








    (I love the easy questions !)
     
  11. In my day it meant Gun/FS group - unless you where a hippy, then it means 'power to the people' or somesuch bobbins. :wink:
     
  12. Snapping motion, hand over face then the ubiquitous point meant break track, snap ambush from the location of said point IIRC. But PCD was a while ago....
     
  13. Snap Ambush hand signal used to be hand over the face followed by a quick thumbs down and point to the intended fire position.