Ham radio

Discussion in 'Hardware - PCs, Consoles, Gadgets' started by David Powell, Apr 2, 2013.

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  1. I have been given to play with and try to sell for someone a old ham radio, A yaesu 290 r, portable works well, ( at least I think it does,) the frequency range is 4.000 to 5.800.problems, what is the frequency for the calling for contacts within that bandwidth.?? seller has a lifelong licence so, im just planning on earwigging.But cannot find any bugger on?? Obviously I am a complete no nothing on these things so pointer would be good.
  2. Hi David, The FT290 operates in the 2m band 144 to 146 Mhz, FM and SSB. If you do not hold an amateur radio callsign (i.e. you've passed the radio amateurs exam and been issued a licence) do not under any circumstances transmit as you will be committing an offence under the Wireless Telegraphy Act.

    Your best option is to contact a local amateur radio club (check with the Radio Society of Great Britain) where a local ham will be happy to assist you.

    It's also worth posting on the Royal Signals part of the forum as many also hold ham licences.

    Good luck. G8***

    P.S. Simplex calling is 145.500 and repeater outputs are found between 145.600 and 145.775 with inputs at -600 KHz (both FM mode)

  3. Tanks ex ten, the display shows 4.000 to 5.800 what is simplex and no I do not intend pressing the send button over.
  4. seen 51.510.many thanks for that.
  5. Sorry for the delay, I'm on early shift so was asleep when you posted last night.

    Simplex is transmit and receive on the same frequency, duplex is transmit and receive on different frequencies and the LCD display omits the initial 14 so 145.500 will just read 5.500.

    That unit is multi mode so it's capable of FM (frequency modulation) SSB (single sideband) and CW (morse).

    PM me if I can help with anything else :biggrin:
  6. I have one of these rigs. Was my first TX/RX rig on gaining my G7 license. Ran it through a small amp (~30W) to a 5 element Yagi which I'd swing around via two ropes from my bedroom window. Got some pretty decent results on SSB from atop the Cliffs of Dover whilst operating from school reaching as far east as Minsk and into the Baltic states on occasion.

    0.5 or 2.5 Watts out (switch on the back). Apart from obviously commiting an offence, unless you have a properly tuned antenna plugged in you could damage it if you TX although it should have an in-built telescopic antenna which will work in the absence of anything better.

    The 2M band, being VHF, has very limited range unless the atmospheric conditions are particularly good. You aren't likely to hear much apart from static but you should be able to hear your local FM repeaters - the best time to listen to these is during rush hour and in the evenings but the topics of conversation can be a bit ho-hum and most stations will be mobile.

    You can try listening in on 144.300 for SSB (usually USB) - you might get lucky - Just listen out for the Freq they agree to move to as they won't sit and chat on that Freq.

    I don't think the Rig is worth a great deal owing to the hobby being on a bit of a wane and the fact that as Morse has dropped out of the license test most Amateurs jump straight onto HF these days. But if the rig is complete (i.e. with original case, mic, carrying strap and in-built antenna), is in good condition and working obviously, then you might get a few quid for it. Ebay probably your best bet.

    EDIT: If you fancy ear-wigging (it is how I got started and I actually enjoy being an SWL more than Operating tbh) then source yourself a general coverage receiver - there are usually a few on Ebay and some of the vintage ones are really impressive bits of kit and really fun to use. Just make sure you have some room outside for a decent length of wire although solutions are available for those with limited space - just do a little research. Building an antenna can be really enjoyable, pretty straight forward and satisfying if it yields some interesting results in the form of receiving signals from exotic far away places. Online DX Clusters can help you find these stations but this takes away some of the satisfaction for me - but each to their own.
  7. Grumblegrunt

    Grumblegrunt LE Book Reviewer